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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Hi, I'm writing a paper on Teti's coffin and I need some help. Could you tell me what some of the symbols mean?
There is so much to see on it--do you see those two big black dogs on the top? Those are representations of the god Anubis, Anubis was the guardian of mummies and he was responsible for escorting souls to the netherworld.
This looks like an eagle, what does it represent?
That is actually a falcon and falcons represent the god Horus. Horus symbolizes order over chaos.
Thanks! What is this eye for?
You will see that eye on many of the coffins--it's called a wedjat-eye or the eye of Horus. These eyes were painted on coffins because it was believed they would allow the deceased to see and participate in funerary rituals. They were painted so that when the person was buried they would always face east toward the rising sun.
Wow. What is this bird for?
That bird represents the goddess Nekhbet and she spreads her wings across the chest of the deceased to protect the mummy.
Is this Anubis too?
Anubis as the jackal on top of an image of a sarcophagus shows him protecting the body during its journey in the afterlife.
Are there any other coffins like this at Brooklyn that I could look at?
There is a whole mummy chamber in the back of the galleries and on your way there the Coffin of Nespanetjerenpere is a good one to check out.
Do we know who painted Teti's coffin and why it is painted so detailed?
Coffins were very important and they were all created with great care--there were many images and prayers you would want on your coffin to ensure you made it safely to the afterlife. In fact, Teti spent one year's salary on his coffin.
One year's salary? Wow.
Yes--that alone shows you how important it was! I can't think of anything I would spend one year's salary on.
Was anything buried with him?
I don't think we know exactly what Teti was buried with but Ancient Egyptians were usually buried with offerings for use by the deceased in the afterlife.
Can you please tell me more about Teti's coffin.
I can tell you that Teti was an artisan who painted tombs in the Valley of the Kings. He paid nearly a year's salary for this coffin, which is made of wood and has five different colors on it.
One particularly interesting fact is that over time, we see more and more people with elaborately decorated coffins. By the New Kingdom, middle ranks of society were able to afford coffins inscribed with parts of 'The Book of the Dead' inscribed on funerary objects. So here, Teti has on the side of his coffin one of the spells from the Book of the Dead. You'll also see four different figures on the side, let me know when you can see them. They're all to the left of the big Wedjat eye.
So let me tell you about them, you see the one all the way to the left, with the bird's head? That's the god Thoth, with the head of an Ibis bird, he's the god of hieroglyphs, writing, and generally wisdom. After him comes the human-headed god Kebehsenuef, who was one of Horus' sons. Then comes Anubis, the god of mummification. He's the one who would weigh the heart of the person traveling through the underworld. You'll see other jackals, who represent Anubis, at the top of the coffin as well. The last one all the way to the right, is Hapi, another son of Horus, who is associated with the Nile and fertility. All together they are depicted as reciting this spell from 'The Book of the Dead' in order to protect Teti's body.
I actually found the text that they are all saying in the hieroglyphs! Here is what Kebehsenuef is saying: 'I am your son, Osiris, I have come to be your protection I have united your bones for you, I have assembled your limbs for you I have brought you your heart, and placed it for you at its place in your body I have strengthened your house after you, as you live, eternally.' And next to Hapi is written: "I have come to be your protection I have bound your head and your limbs for you I have smitten you enemies beneath you for you, and given you your head, eternally.'
I can tell you that I got some of the information from our website, some from our publication 'To Live Forever' written by our curator Dr. Edward Bleiberg, and the translation of 'The Book of the Dead' from the University College of London website.
What is the waterfall supposed to represent?
This piece is called "Everlasting Waterfall" and was inspired by Steir's interest in both landscape as imagery and the liquid properties of paint. You may have already found the label, but it outlines how the artist applied a number of horizontal brushstrokes loaded with thinned paint along the top edge of the canvas, and the paint streamed down in lines, drips, and, rivulets, just like water would.
Her subject is partly the natural landscape. Her subject could also be paint itself: its physical properties and how what it does when it's allowed to follow the pull of gravity. She didn't manipulate the paint's "fall," because she was interested giving up control and letting chance take over.
Who is this?
That is William Penn, Quaker and founding father of the state of Pennsylvania. This window was probably shown to the leaders of the Plymouth Church of the Pilgrims, in Brooklyn Heights, for approval to proceed with the extant, large window titled "William Penn, Peace Movement, Pennsylvania" that the Stained Glass Studio executed for the church. Penn is depicted in this window because, like Plymouth Church's first pastor, Henry Ward Beecher, he too was an early opponent of slavery. This gives the subject social meaning for the congregation.
Where is this?
You may have read this already on the label for that painting, but if you look very, very closely, you can just make out two smokestacks from New Jersey in the sunrise haze in the distance.
George Inness lived near the town of Montclair, New Jersey, and those smokestacks were part of a printing factory near the artist's home.
What is this?
It is a mask created by people in the Mau culture in northern Africa. It was used in a secret society known as "koma." Only those initiated into the special society were even allowed to see this mask! Many materials were added to this mask to imbue it with spiritual power. There is even an area near the mouth where a bundle of medicinal ingredients would be added to add spiritual power to the mask.
What is this?
This is a ceremonial house figure and it has so many different animals and figures depicted on it. Organic materials help imbue this object with a special presence. After being carved in the woods, the figure would be coated in mud and painted.
What is that?
That is actually a type of piano/harpsicord called a "Spinet."
Can you tell me more about the sugar industry and its history?
Most sugar production was done on cane plantations in the Caribbean and Brazil, and the plantations were worked on by slaves. That's the general, broad-sweeping overview of the history of the sugar industry. Wealthy Europeans and American land-owners profited off of the slave-labor and the increasing global demand for sugar.
There is another tea set in this room which shows a teapot from 1876 in this room with a Chinese man's head and a sugar bowl with a Black man's head on the lid. The connection between sugar production and slavery was inherent and clear.
Okay, thank you! That helps a lot and totally makes sense. I felt like I didn't really understand the ways in which the industry functioned and for how long etc. but I think it makes more sense now that it was slave labor that made it so exploitative.
Kara Walker's work is incredible at addressing the cruelty of slavery. I wish we had her silhouette works on view, but they're currently not up. There's a really powerful painting in the American Art galleries (also on the 5th floor) that shows a family riding on a horse escaping slave conditions in the south. The artist Eastman Johnson saw the scene first-hand and was so emotionally moved he created the painting. It's called "A Ride for Liberty."
Wow. How did the vase get this rich blue color?
That is made of a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling).  The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Hi, I'm writing a paper on Teti's coffin and I need some help. Could you tell me what some of the symbols mean?
There is so much to see on it--do you see those two big black dogs on the top? Those are representations of the god Anubis, Anubis was the guardian of mummies and he was responsible for escorting souls to the netherworld.
This looks like an eagle, what does it represent?
That is actually a falcon and falcons represent the god Horus. Horus symbolizes order over chaos.
Thanks! What is this eye for?
You will see that eye on many of the coffins--it's called a wedjat-eye or the eye of Horus. These eyes were painted on coffins because it was believed they would allow the deceased to see and participate in funerary rituals. They were painted so that when the person was buried they would always face east toward the rising sun.
Wow. What is this bird for?
That bird represents the goddess Nekhbet and she spreads her wings across the chest of the deceased to protect the mummy.
Is this Anubis too?
Anubis as the jackal on top of an image of a sarcophagus shows him protecting the body during its journey in the afterlife.
Are there any other coffins like this at Brooklyn that I could look at?
There is a whole mummy chamber in the back of the galleries and on your way there the Coffin of Nespanetjerenpere is a good one to check out.
Do we know who painted Teti's coffin and why it is painted so detailed?
Coffins were very important and they were all created with great care--there were many images and prayers you would want on your coffin to ensure you made it safely to the afterlife. In fact, Teti spent one year's salary on his coffin.
One year's salary? Wow.
Yes--that alone shows you how important it was! I can't think of anything I would spend one year's salary on.
Was anything buried with him?
I don't think we know exactly what Teti was buried with but Ancient Egyptians were usually buried with offerings for use by the deceased in the afterlife.
Can you please tell me more about Teti's coffin.
I can tell you that Teti was an artisan who painted tombs in the Valley of the Kings. He paid nearly a year's salary for this coffin, which is made of wood and has five different colors on it.
One particularly interesting fact is that over time, we see more and more people with elaborately decorated coffins. By the New Kingdom, middle ranks of society were able to afford coffins inscribed with parts of 'The Book of the Dead' inscribed on funerary objects. So here, Teti has on the side of his coffin one of the spells from the Book of the Dead. You'll also see four different figures on the side, let me know when you can see them. They're all to the left of the big Wedjat eye.
So let me tell you about them, you see the one all the way to the left, with the bird's head? That's the god Thoth, with the head of an Ibis bird, he's the god of hieroglyphs, writing, and generally wisdom. After him comes the human-headed god Kebehsenuef, who was one of Horus' sons. Then comes Anubis, the god of mummification. He's the one who would weigh the heart of the person traveling through the underworld. You'll see other jackals, who represent Anubis, at the top of the coffin as well. The last one all the way to the right, is Hapi, another son of Horus, who is associated with the Nile and fertility. All together they are depicted as reciting this spell from 'The Book of the Dead' in order to protect Teti's body.
I actually found the text that they are all saying in the hieroglyphs! Here is what Kebehsenuef is saying: 'I am your son, Osiris, I have come to be your protection I have united your bones for you, I have assembled your limbs for you I have brought you your heart, and placed it for you at its place in your body I have strengthened your house after you, as you live, eternally.' And next to Hapi is written: "I have come to be your protection I have bound your head and your limbs for you I have smitten you enemies beneath you for you, and given you your head, eternally.'
I can tell you that I got some of the information from our website, some from our publication 'To Live Forever' written by our curator Dr. Edward Bleiberg, and the translation of 'The Book of the Dead' from the University College of London website.
What is the waterfall supposed to represent?
This piece is called "Everlasting Waterfall" and was inspired by Steir's interest in both landscape as imagery and the liquid properties of paint. You may have already found the label, but it outlines how the artist applied a number of horizontal brushstrokes loaded with thinned paint along the top edge of the canvas, and the paint streamed down in lines, drips, and, rivulets, just like water would.
Her subject is partly the natural landscape. Her subject could also be paint itself: its physical properties and how what it does when it's allowed to follow the pull of gravity. She didn't manipulate the paint's "fall," because she was interested giving up control and letting chance take over.
Who is this?
That is William Penn, Quaker and founding father of the state of Pennsylvania. This window was probably shown to the leaders of the Plymouth Church of the Pilgrims, in Brooklyn Heights, for approval to proceed with the extant, large window titled "William Penn, Peace Movement, Pennsylvania" that the Stained Glass Studio executed for the church. Penn is depicted in this window because, like Plymouth Church's first pastor, Henry Ward Beecher, he too was an early opponent of slavery. This gives the subject social meaning for the congregation.
Where is this?
You may have read this already on the label for that painting, but if you look very, very closely, you can just make out two smokestacks from New Jersey in the sunrise haze in the distance.
George Inness lived near the town of Montclair, New Jersey, and those smokestacks were part of a printing factory near the artist's home.
What is this?
It is a mask created by people in the Mau culture in northern Africa. It was used in a secret society known as "koma." Only those initiated into the special society were even allowed to see this mask! Many materials were added to this mask to imbue it with spiritual power. There is even an area near the mouth where a bundle of medicinal ingredients would be added to add spiritual power to the mask.
What is this?
This is a ceremonial house figure and it has so many different animals and figures depicted on it. Organic materials help imbue this object with a special presence. After being carved in the woods, the figure would be coated in mud and painted.
What is that?
That is actually a type of piano/harpsicord called a "Spinet."
Can you tell me more about the sugar industry and its history?
Most sugar production was done on cane plantations in the Caribbean and Brazil, and the plantations were worked on by slaves. That's the general, broad-sweeping overview of the history of the sugar industry. Wealthy Europeans and American land-owners profited off of the slave-labor and the increasing global demand for sugar.
There is another tea set in this room which shows a teapot from 1876 in this room with a Chinese man's head and a sugar bowl with a Black man's head on the lid. The connection between sugar production and slavery was inherent and clear.
Okay, thank you! That helps a lot and totally makes sense. I felt like I didn't really understand the ways in which the industry functioned and for how long etc. but I think it makes more sense now that it was slave labor that made it so exploitative.
Kara Walker's work is incredible at addressing the cruelty of slavery. I wish we had her silhouette works on view, but they're currently not up. There's a really powerful painting in the American Art galleries (also on the 5th floor) that shows a family riding on a horse escaping slave conditions in the south. The artist Eastman Johnson saw the scene first-hand and was so emotionally moved he created the painting. It's called "A Ride for Liberty."
Wow. How did the vase get this rich blue color?
That is made of a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling).  The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Hi, I'm writing a paper on Teti's coffin and I need some help. Could you tell me what some of the symbols mean?
There is so much to see on it--do you see those two big black dogs on the top? Those are representations of the god Anubis, Anubis was the guardian of mummies and he was responsible for escorting souls to the netherworld.
This looks like an eagle, what does it represent?
That is actually a falcon and falcons represent the god Horus. Horus symbolizes order over chaos.
Thanks! What is this eye for?
You will see that eye on many of the coffins--it's called a wedjat-eye or the eye of Horus. These eyes were painted on coffins because it was believed they would allow the deceased to see and participate in funerary rituals. They were painted so that when the person was buried they would always face east toward the rising sun.
Wow. What is this bird for?
That bird represents the goddess Nekhbet and she spreads her wings across the chest of the deceased to protect the mummy.
Is this Anubis too?
Anubis as the jackal on top of an image of a sarcophagus shows him protecting the body during its journey in the afterlife.
Are there any other coffins like this at Brooklyn that I could look at?
There is a whole mummy chamber in the back of the galleries and on your way there the Coffin of Nespanetjerenpere is a good one to check out.
Do we know who painted Teti's coffin and why it is painted so detailed?
Coffins were very important and they were all created with great care--there were many images and prayers you would want on your coffin to ensure you made it safely to the afterlife. In fact, Teti spent one year's salary on his coffin.
One year's salary? Wow.
Yes--that alone shows you how important it was! I can't think of anything I would spend one year's salary on.
Was anything buried with him?
I don't think we know exactly what Teti was buried with but Ancient Egyptians were usually buried with offerings for use by the deceased in the afterlife.
Can you please tell me more about Teti's coffin.
I can tell you that Teti was an artisan who painted tombs in the Valley of the Kings. He paid nearly a year's salary for this coffin, which is made of wood and has five different colors on it.
One particularly interesting fact is that over time, we see more and more people with elaborately decorated coffins. By the New Kingdom, middle ranks of society were able to afford coffins inscribed with parts of 'The Book of the Dead' inscribed on funerary objects. So here, Teti has on the side of his coffin one of the spells from the Book of the Dead. You'll also see four different figures on the side, let me know when you can see them. They're all to the left of the big Wedjat eye.
So let me tell you about them, you see the one all the way to the left, with the bird's head? That's the god Thoth, with the head of an Ibis bird, he's the god of hieroglyphs, writing, and generally wisdom. After him comes the human-headed god Kebehsenuef, who was one of Horus' sons. Then comes Anubis, the god of mummification. He's the one who would weigh the heart of the person traveling through the underworld. You'll see other jackals, who represent Anubis, at the top of the coffin as well. The last one all the way to the right, is Hapi, another son of Horus, who is associated with the Nile and fertility. All together they are depicted as reciting this spell from 'The Book of the Dead' in order to protect Teti's body.
I actually found the text that they are all saying in the hieroglyphs! Here is what Kebehsenuef is saying: 'I am your son, Osiris, I have come to be your protection I have united your bones for you, I have assembled your limbs for you I have brought you your heart, and placed it for you at its place in your body I have strengthened your house after you, as you live, eternally.' And next to Hapi is written: "I have come to be your protection I have bound your head and your limbs for you I have smitten you enemies beneath you for you, and given you your head, eternally.'
I can tell you that I got some of the information from our website, some from our publication 'To Live Forever' written by our curator Dr. Edward Bleiberg, and the translation of 'The Book of the Dead' from the University College of London website.
What is the waterfall supposed to represent?
This piece is called "Everlasting Waterfall" and was inspired by Steir's interest in both landscape as imagery and the liquid properties of paint. You may have already found the label, but it outlines how the artist applied a number of horizontal brushstrokes loaded with thinned paint along the top edge of the canvas, and the paint streamed down in lines, drips, and, rivulets, just like water would.
Her subject is partly the natural landscape. Her subject could also be paint itself: its physical properties and how what it does when it's allowed to follow the pull of gravity. She didn't manipulate the paint's "fall," because she was interested giving up control and letting chance take over.
Who is this?
That is William Penn, Quaker and founding father of the state of Pennsylvania. This window was probably shown to the leaders of the Plymouth Church of the Pilgrims, in Brooklyn Heights, for approval to proceed with the extant, large window titled "William Penn, Peace Movement, Pennsylvania" that the Stained Glass Studio executed for the church. Penn is depicted in this window because, like Plymouth Church's first pastor, Henry Ward Beecher, he too was an early opponent of slavery. This gives the subject social meaning for the congregation.
Where is this?
You may have read this already on the label for that painting, but if you look very, very closely, you can just make out two smokestacks from New Jersey in the sunrise haze in the distance.
George Inness lived near the town of Montclair, New Jersey, and those smokestacks were part of a printing factory near the artist's home.
What is this?
It is a mask created by people in the Mau culture in northern Africa. It was used in a secret society known as "koma." Only those initiated into the special society were even allowed to see this mask! Many materials were added to this mask to imbue it with spiritual power. There is even an area near the mouth where a bundle of medicinal ingredients would be added to add spiritual power to the mask.
What is this?
This is a ceremonial house figure and it has so many different animals and figures depicted on it. Organic materials help imbue this object with a special presence. After being carved in the woods, the figure would be coated in mud and painted.
What is that?
That is actually a type of piano/harpsicord called a "Spinet."
Can you tell me more about the sugar industry and its history?
Most sugar production was done on cane plantations in the Caribbean and Brazil, and the plantations were worked on by slaves. That's the general, broad-sweeping overview of the history of the sugar industry. Wealthy Europeans and American land-owners profited off of the slave-labor and the increasing global demand for sugar.
There is another tea set in this room which shows a teapot from 1876 in this room with a Chinese man's head and a sugar bowl with a Black man's head on the lid. The connection between sugar production and slavery was inherent and clear.
Okay, thank you! That helps a lot and totally makes sense. I felt like I didn't really understand the ways in which the industry functioned and for how long etc. but I think it makes more sense now that it was slave labor that made it so exploitative.
Kara Walker's work is incredible at addressing the cruelty of slavery. I wish we had her silhouette works on view, but they're currently not up. There's a really powerful painting in the American Art galleries (also on the 5th floor) that shows a family riding on a horse escaping slave conditions in the south. The artist Eastman Johnson saw the scene first-hand and was so emotionally moved he created the painting. It's called "A Ride for Liberty."
Wow. How did the vase get this rich blue color?
That is made of a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling).  The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until fall 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Hi, I'm writing a paper on Teti's coffin and I need some help. Could you tell me what some of the symbols mean?
There is so much to see on it--do you see those two big black dogs on the top? Those are representations of the god Anubis, Anubis was the guardian of mummies and he was responsible for escorting souls to the netherworld.
This looks like an eagle, what does it represent?
That is actually a falcon and falcons represent the god Horus. Horus symbolizes order over chaos.
Thanks! What is this eye for?
You will see that eye on many of the coffins--it's called a wedjat-eye or the eye of Horus. These eyes were painted on coffins because it was believed they would allow the deceased to see and participate in funerary rituals. They were painted so that when the person was buried they would always face east toward the rising sun.
Wow. What is this bird for?
That bird represents the goddess Nekhbet and she spreads her wings across the chest of the deceased to protect the mummy.
Is this Anubis too?
Anubis as the jackal on top of an image of a sarcophagus shows him protecting the body during its journey in the afterlife.
Are there any other coffins like this at Brooklyn that I could look at?
There is a whole mummy chamber in the back of the galleries and on your way there the Coffin of Nespanetjerenpere is a good one to check out.
Do we know who painted Teti's coffin and why it is painted so detailed?
Coffins were very important and they were all created with great care--there were many images and prayers you would want on your coffin to ensure you made it safely to the afterlife. In fact, Teti spent one year's salary on his coffin.
One year's salary? Wow.
Yes--that alone shows you how important it was! I can't think of anything I would spend one year's salary on.
Was anything buried with him?
I don't think we know exactly what Teti was buried with but Ancient Egyptians were usually buried with offerings for use by the deceased in the afterlife.
Can you please tell me more about Teti's coffin.
I can tell you that Teti was an artisan who painted tombs in the Valley of the Kings. He paid nearly a year's salary for this coffin, which is made of wood and has five different colors on it.
One particularly interesting fact is that over time, we see more and more people with elaborately decorated coffins. By the New Kingdom, middle ranks of society were able to afford coffins inscribed with parts of 'The Book of the Dead' inscribed on funerary objects. So here, Teti has on the side of his coffin one of the spells from the Book of the Dead. You'll also see four different figures on the side, let me know when you can see them. They're all to the left of the big Wedjat eye.
So let me tell you about them, you see the one all the way to the left, with the bird's head? That's the god Thoth, with the head of an Ibis bird, he's the god of hieroglyphs, writing, and generally wisdom. After him comes the human-headed god Kebehsenuef, who was one of Horus' sons. Then comes Anubis, the god of mummification. He's the one who would weigh the heart of the person traveling through the underworld. You'll see other jackals, who represent Anubis, at the top of the coffin as well. The last one all the way to the right, is Hapi, another son of Horus, who is associated with the Nile and fertility. All together they are depicted as reciting this spell from 'The Book of the Dead' in order to protect Teti's body.
I actually found the text that they are all saying in the hieroglyphs! Here is what Kebehsenuef is saying: 'I am your son, Osiris, I have come to be your protection I have united your bones for you, I have assembled your limbs for you I have brought you your heart, and placed it for you at its place in your body I have strengthened your house after you, as you live, eternally.' And next to Hapi is written: "I have come to be your protection I have bound your head and your limbs for you I have smitten you enemies beneath you for you, and given you your head, eternally.'
I can tell you that I got some of the information from our website, some from our publication 'To Live Forever' written by our curator Dr. Edward Bleiberg, and the translation of 'The Book of the Dead' from the University College of London website.
What is the waterfall supposed to represent?
This piece is called "Everlasting Waterfall" and was inspired by Steir's interest in both landscape as imagery and the liquid properties of paint. You may have already found the label, but it outlines how the artist applied a number of horizontal brushstrokes loaded with thinned paint along the top edge of the canvas, and the paint streamed down in lines, drips, and, rivulets, just like water would.
Her subject is partly the natural landscape. Her subject could also be paint itself: its physical properties and how what it does when it's allowed to follow the pull of gravity. She didn't manipulate the paint's "fall," because she was interested giving up control and letting chance take over.
Who is this?
That is William Penn, Quaker and founding father of the state of Pennsylvania. This window was probably shown to the leaders of the Plymouth Church of the Pilgrims, in Brooklyn Heights, for approval to proceed with the extant, large window titled "William Penn, Peace Movement, Pennsylvania" that the Stained Glass Studio executed for the church. Penn is depicted in this window because, like Plymouth Church's first pastor, Henry Ward Beecher, he too was an early opponent of slavery. This gives the subject social meaning for the congregation.
Where is this?
You may have read this already on the label for that painting, but if you look very, very closely, you can just make out two smokestacks from New Jersey in the sunrise haze in the distance.
George Inness lived near the town of Montclair, New Jersey, and those smokestacks were part of a printing factory near the artist's home.
What is this?
It is a mask created by people in the Mau culture in northern Africa. It was used in a secret society known as "koma." Only those initiated into the special society were even allowed to see this mask! Many materials were added to this mask to imbue it with spiritual power. There is even an area near the mouth where a bundle of medicinal ingredients would be added to add spiritual power to the mask.
What is this?
This is a ceremonial house figure and it has so many different animals and figures depicted on it. Organic materials help imbue this object with a special presence. After being carved in the woods, the figure would be coated in mud and painted.
What is that?
That is actually a type of piano/harpsicord called a "Spinet."
Can you tell me more about the sugar industry and its history?
Most sugar production was done on cane plantations in the Caribbean and Brazil, and the plantations were worked on by slaves. That's the general, broad-sweeping overview of the history of the sugar industry. Wealthy Europeans and American land-owners profited off of the slave-labor and the increasing global demand for sugar.
There is another tea set in this room which shows a teapot from 1876 in this room with a Chinese man's head and a sugar bowl with a Black man's head on the lid. The connection between sugar production and slavery was inherent and clear.
Okay, thank you! That helps a lot and totally makes sense. I felt like I didn't really understand the ways in which the industry functioned and for how long etc. but I think it makes more sense now that it was slave labor that made it so exploitative.
Kara Walker's work is incredible at addressing the cruelty of slavery. I wish we had her silhouette works on view, but they're currently not up. There's a really powerful painting in the American Art galleries (also on the 5th floor) that shows a family riding on a horse escaping slave conditions in the south. The artist Eastman Johnson saw the scene first-hand and was so emotionally moved he created the painting. It's called "A Ride for Liberty."
Wow. How did the vase get this rich blue color?
That is made of a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling).  The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Hi, I'm writing a paper on Teti's coffin and I need some help. Could you tell me what some of the symbols mean?
There is so much to see on it--do you see those two big black dogs on the top? Those are representations of the god Anubis, Anubis was the guardian of mummies and he was responsible for escorting souls to the netherworld.
This looks like an eagle, what does it represent?
That is actually a falcon and falcons represent the god Horus. Horus symbolizes order over chaos.
Thanks! What is this eye for?
You will see that eye on many of the coffins--it's called a wedjat-eye or the eye of Horus. These eyes were painted on coffins because it was believed they would allow the deceased to see and participate in funerary rituals. They were painted so that when the person was buried they would always face east toward the rising sun.
Wow. What is this bird for?
That bird represents the goddess Nekhbet and she spreads her wings across the chest of the deceased to protect the mummy.
Is this Anubis too?
Anubis as the jackal on top of an image of a sarcophagus shows him protecting the body during its journey in the afterlife.
Are there any other coffins like this at Brooklyn that I could look at?
There is a whole mummy chamber in the back of the galleries and on your way there the Coffin of Nespanetjerenpere is a good one to check out.
Do we know who painted Teti's coffin and why it is painted so detailed?
Coffins were very important and they were all created with great care--there were many images and prayers you would want on your coffin to ensure you made it safely to the afterlife. In fact, Teti spent one year's salary on his coffin.
One year's salary? Wow.
Yes--that alone shows you how important it was! I can't think of anything I would spend one year's salary on.
Was anything buried with him?
I don't think we know exactly what Teti was buried with but Ancient Egyptians were usually buried with offerings for use by the deceased in the afterlife.
Can you please tell me more about Teti's coffin.
I can tell you that Teti was an artisan who painted tombs in the Valley of the Kings. He paid nearly a year's salary for this coffin, which is made of wood and has five different colors on it.
One particularly interesting fact is that over time, we see more and more people with elaborately decorated coffins. By the New Kingdom, middle ranks of society were able to afford coffins inscribed with parts of 'The Book of the Dead' inscribed on funerary objects. So here, Teti has on the side of his coffin one of the spells from the Book of the Dead. You'll also see four different figures on the side, let me know when you can see them. They're all to the left of the big Wedjat eye.
So let me tell you about them, you see the one all the way to the left, with the bird's head? That's the god Thoth, with the head of an Ibis bird, he's the god of hieroglyphs, writing, and generally wisdom. After him comes the human-headed god Kebehsenuef, who was one of Horus' sons. Then comes Anubis, the god of mummification. He's the one who would weigh the heart of the person traveling through the underworld. You'll see other jackals, who represent Anubis, at the top of the coffin as well. The last one all the way to the right, is Hapi, another son of Horus, who is associated with the Nile and fertility. All together they are depicted as reciting this spell from 'The Book of the Dead' in order to protect Teti's body.
I actually found the text that they are all saying in the hieroglyphs! Here is what Kebehsenuef is saying: 'I am your son, Osiris, I have come to be your protection I have united your bones for you, I have assembled your limbs for you I have brought you your heart, and placed it for you at its place in your body I have strengthened your house after you, as you live, eternally.' And next to Hapi is written: "I have come to be your protection I have bound your head and your limbs for you I have smitten you enemies beneath you for you, and given you your head, eternally.'
I can tell you that I got some of the information from our website, some from our publication 'To Live Forever' written by our curator Dr. Edward Bleiberg, and the translation of 'The Book of the Dead' from the University College of London website.
What is the waterfall supposed to represent?
This piece is called "Everlasting Waterfall" and was inspired by Steir's interest in both landscape as imagery and the liquid properties of paint. You may have already found the label, but it outlines how the artist applied a number of horizontal brushstrokes loaded with thinned paint along the top edge of the canvas, and the paint streamed down in lines, drips, and, rivulets, just like water would.
Her subject is partly the natural landscape. Her subject could also be paint itself: its physical properties and how what it does when it's allowed to follow the pull of gravity. She didn't manipulate the paint's "fall," because she was interested giving up control and letting chance take over.
Who is this?
That is William Penn, Quaker and founding father of the state of Pennsylvania. This window was probably shown to the leaders of the Plymouth Church of the Pilgrims, in Brooklyn Heights, for approval to proceed with the extant, large window titled "William Penn, Peace Movement, Pennsylvania" that the Stained Glass Studio executed for the church. Penn is depicted in this window because, like Plymouth Church's first pastor, Henry Ward Beecher, he too was an early opponent of slavery. This gives the subject social meaning for the congregation.
Where is this?
You may have read this already on the label for that painting, but if you look very, very closely, you can just make out two smokestacks from New Jersey in the sunrise haze in the distance.
George Inness lived near the town of Montclair, New Jersey, and those smokestacks were part of a printing factory near the artist's home.
What is this?
It is a mask created by people in the Mau culture in northern Africa. It was used in a secret society known as "koma." Only those initiated into the special society were even allowed to see this mask! Many materials were added to this mask to imbue it with spiritual power. There is even an area near the mouth where a bundle of medicinal ingredients would be added to add spiritual power to the mask.
What is this?
This is a ceremonial house figure and it has so many different animals and figures depicted on it. Organic materials help imbue this object with a special presence. After being carved in the woods, the figure would be coated in mud and painted.
What is that?
That is actually a type of piano/harpsicord called a "Spinet."
Can you tell me more about the sugar industry and its history?
Most sugar production was done on cane plantations in the Caribbean and Brazil, and the plantations were worked on by slaves. That's the general, broad-sweeping overview of the history of the sugar industry. Wealthy Europeans and American land-owners profited off of the slave-labor and the increasing global demand for sugar.
There is another tea set in this room which shows a teapot from 1876 in this room with a Chinese man's head and a sugar bowl with a Black man's head on the lid. The connection between sugar production and slavery was inherent and clear.
Okay, thank you! That helps a lot and totally makes sense. I felt like I didn't really understand the ways in which the industry functioned and for how long etc. but I think it makes more sense now that it was slave labor that made it so exploitative.
Kara Walker's work is incredible at addressing the cruelty of slavery. I wish we had her silhouette works on view, but they're currently not up. There's a really powerful painting in the American Art galleries (also on the 5th floor) that shows a family riding on a horse escaping slave conditions in the south. The artist Eastman Johnson saw the scene first-hand and was so emotionally moved he created the painting. It's called "A Ride for Liberty."
Wow. How did the vase get this rich blue color?
That is made of a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling).  The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Hi, I'm writing a paper on Teti's coffin and I need some help. Could you tell me what some of the symbols mean?
There is so much to see on it--do you see those two big black dogs on the top? Those are representations of the god Anubis, Anubis was the guardian of mummies and he was responsible for escorting souls to the netherworld.
This looks like an eagle, what does it represent?
That is actually a falcon and falcons represent the god Horus. Horus symbolizes order over chaos.
Thanks! What is this eye for?
You will see that eye on many of the coffins--it's called a wedjat-eye or the eye of Horus. These eyes were painted on coffins because it was believed they would allow the deceased to see and participate in funerary rituals. They were painted so that when the person was buried they would always face east toward the rising sun.
Wow. What is this bird for?
That bird represents the goddess Nekhbet and she spreads her wings across the chest of the deceased to protect the mummy.
Is this Anubis too?
Anubis as the jackal on top of an image of a sarcophagus shows him protecting the body during its journey in the afterlife.
Are there any other coffins like this at Brooklyn that I could look at?
There is a whole mummy chamber in the back of the galleries and on your way there the Coffin of Nespanetjerenpere is a good one to check out.
Do we know who painted Teti's coffin and why it is painted so detailed?
Coffins were very important and they were all created with great care--there were many images and prayers you would want on your coffin to ensure you made it safely to the afterlife. In fact, Teti spent one year's salary on his coffin.
One year's salary? Wow.
Yes--that alone shows you how important it was! I can't think of anything I would spend one year's salary on.
Was anything buried with him?
I don't think we know exactly what Teti was buried with but Ancient Egyptians were usually buried with offerings for use by the deceased in the afterlife.
Can you please tell me more about Teti's coffin.
I can tell you that Teti was an artisan who painted tombs in the Valley of the Kings. He paid nearly a year's salary for this coffin, which is made of wood and has five different colors on it.
One particularly interesting fact is that over time, we see more and more people with elaborately decorated coffins. By the New Kingdom, middle ranks of society were able to afford coffins inscribed with parts of 'The Book of the Dead' inscribed on funerary objects. So here, Teti has on the side of his coffin one of the spells from the Book of the Dead. You'll also see four different figures on the side, let me know when you can see them. They're all to the left of the big Wedjat eye.
So let me tell you about them, you see the one all the way to the left, with the bird's head? That's the god Thoth, with the head of an Ibis bird, he's the god of hieroglyphs, writing, and generally wisdom. After him comes the human-headed god Kebehsenuef, who was one of Horus' sons. Then comes Anubis, the god of mummification. He's the one who would weigh the heart of the person traveling through the underworld. You'll see other jackals, who represent Anubis, at the top of the coffin as well. The last one all the way to the right, is Hapi, another son of Horus, who is associated with the Nile and fertility. All together they are depicted as reciting this spell from 'The Book of the Dead' in order to protect Teti's body.
I actually found the text that they are all saying in the hieroglyphs! Here is what Kebehsenuef is saying: 'I am your son, Osiris, I have come to be your protection I have united your bones for you, I have assembled your limbs for you I have brought you your heart, and placed it for you at its place in your body I have strengthened your house after you, as you live, eternally.' And next to Hapi is written: "I have come to be your protection I have bound your head and your limbs for you I have smitten you enemies beneath you for you, and given you your head, eternally.'
I can tell you that I got some of the information from our website, some from our publication 'To Live Forever' written by our curator Dr. Edward Bleiberg, and the translation of 'The Book of the Dead' from the University College of London website.
What is the waterfall supposed to represent?
This piece is called "Everlasting Waterfall" and was inspired by Steir's interest in both landscape as imagery and the liquid properties of paint. You may have already found the label, but it outlines how the artist applied a number of horizontal brushstrokes loaded with thinned paint along the top edge of the canvas, and the paint streamed down in lines, drips, and, rivulets, just like water would.
Her subject is partly the natural landscape. Her subject could also be paint itself: its physical properties and how what it does when it's allowed to follow the pull of gravity. She didn't manipulate the paint's "fall," because she was interested giving up control and letting chance take over.
Who is this?
That is William Penn, Quaker and founding father of the state of Pennsylvania. This window was probably shown to the leaders of the Plymouth Church of the Pilgrims, in Brooklyn Heights, for approval to proceed with the extant, large window titled "William Penn, Peace Movement, Pennsylvania" that the Stained Glass Studio executed for the church. Penn is depicted in this window because, like Plymouth Church's first pastor, Henry Ward Beecher, he too was an early opponent of slavery. This gives the subject social meaning for the congregation.
Where is this?
You may have read this already on the label for that painting, but if you look very, very closely, you can just make out two smokestacks from New Jersey in the sunrise haze in the distance.
George Inness lived near the town of Montclair, New Jersey, and those smokestacks were part of a printing factory near the artist's home.
What is this?
It is a mask created by people in the Mau culture in northern Africa. It was used in a secret society known as "koma." Only those initiated into the special society were even allowed to see this mask! Many materials were added to this mask to imbue it with spiritual power. There is even an area near the mouth where a bundle of medicinal ingredients would be added to add spiritual power to the mask.
What is this?
This is a ceremonial house figure and it has so many different animals and figures depicted on it. Organic materials help imbue this object with a special presence. After being carved in the woods, the figure would be coated in mud and painted.
What is that?
That is actually a type of piano/harpsicord called a "Spinet."
Can you tell me more about the sugar industry and its history?
Most sugar production was done on cane plantations in the Caribbean and Brazil, and the plantations were worked on by slaves. That's the general, broad-sweeping overview of the history of the sugar industry. Wealthy Europeans and American land-owners profited off of the slave-labor and the increasing global demand for sugar.
There is another tea set in this room which shows a teapot from 1876 in this room with a Chinese man's head and a sugar bowl with a Black man's head on the lid. The connection between sugar production and slavery was inherent and clear.
Okay, thank you! That helps a lot and totally makes sense. I felt like I didn't really understand the ways in which the industry functioned and for how long etc. but I think it makes more sense now that it was slave labor that made it so exploitative.
Kara Walker's work is incredible at addressing the cruelty of slavery. I wish we had her silhouette works on view, but they're currently not up. There's a really powerful painting in the American Art galleries (also on the 5th floor) that shows a family riding on a horse escaping slave conditions in the south. The artist Eastman Johnson saw the scene first-hand and was so emotionally moved he created the painting. It's called "A Ride for Liberty."
Wow. How did the vase get this rich blue color?
That is made of a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling).  The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Hi, I'm writing a paper on Teti's coffin and I need some help. Could you tell me what some of the symbols mean?
There is so much to see on it--do you see those two big black dogs on the top? Those are representations of the god Anubis, Anubis was the guardian of mummies and he was responsible for escorting souls to the netherworld.
This looks like an eagle, what does it represent?
That is actually a falcon and falcons represent the god Horus. Horus symbolizes order over chaos.
Thanks! What is this eye for?
You will see that eye on many of the coffins--it's called a wedjat-eye or the eye of Horus. These eyes were painted on coffins because it was believed they would allow the deceased to see and participate in funerary rituals. They were painted so that when the person was buried they would always face east toward the rising sun.
Wow. What is this bird for?
That bird represents the goddess Nekhbet and she spreads her wings across the chest of the deceased to protect the mummy.
Is this Anubis too?
Anubis as the jackal on top of an image of a sarcophagus shows him protecting the body during its journey in the afterlife.
Are there any other coffins like this at Brooklyn that I could look at?
There is a whole mummy chamber in the back of the galleries and on your way there the Coffin of Nespanetjerenpere is a good one to check out.
Do we know who painted Teti's coffin and why it is painted so detailed?
Coffins were very important and they were all created with great care--there were many images and prayers you would want on your coffin to ensure you made it safely to the afterlife. In fact, Teti spent one year's salary on his coffin.
One year's salary? Wow.
Yes--that alone shows you how important it was! I can't think of anything I would spend one year's salary on.
Was anything buried with him?
I don't think we know exactly what Teti was buried with but Ancient Egyptians were usually buried with offerings for use by the deceased in the afterlife.
Can you please tell me more about Teti's coffin.
I can tell you that Teti was an artisan who painted tombs in the Valley of the Kings. He paid nearly a year's salary for this coffin, which is made of wood and has five different colors on it.
One particularly interesting fact is that over time, we see more and more people with elaborately decorated coffins. By the New Kingdom, middle ranks of society were able to afford coffins inscribed with parts of 'The Book of the Dead' inscribed on funerary objects. So here, Teti has on the side of his coffin one of the spells from the Book of the Dead. You'll also see four different figures on the side, let me know when you can see them. They're all to the left of the big Wedjat eye.
So let me tell you about them, you see the one all the way to the left, with the bird's head? That's the god Thoth, with the head of an Ibis bird, he's the god of hieroglyphs, writing, and generally wisdom. After him comes the human-headed god Kebehsenuef, who was one of Horus' sons. Then comes Anubis, the god of mummification. He's the one who would weigh the heart of the person traveling through the underworld. You'll see other jackals, who represent Anubis, at the top of the coffin as well. The last one all the way to the right, is Hapi, another son of Horus, who is associated with the Nile and fertility. All together they are depicted as reciting this spell from 'The Book of the Dead' in order to protect Teti's body.
I actually found the text that they are all saying in the hieroglyphs! Here is what Kebehsenuef is saying: 'I am your son, Osiris, I have come to be your protection I have united your bones for you, I have assembled your limbs for you I have brought you your heart, and placed it for you at its place in your body I have strengthened your house after you, as you live, eternally.' And next to Hapi is written: "I have come to be your protection I have bound your head and your limbs for you I have smitten you enemies beneath you for you, and given you your head, eternally.'
I can tell you that I got some of the information from our website, some from our publication 'To Live Forever' written by our curator Dr. Edward Bleiberg, and the translation of 'The Book of the Dead' from the University College of London website.
What is the waterfall supposed to represent?
This piece is called "Everlasting Waterfall" and was inspired by Steir's interest in both landscape as imagery and the liquid properties of paint. You may have already found the label, but it outlines how the artist applied a number of horizontal brushstrokes loaded with thinned paint along the top edge of the canvas, and the paint streamed down in lines, drips, and, rivulets, just like water would.
Her subject is partly the natural landscape. Her subject could also be paint itself: its physical properties and how what it does when it's allowed to follow the pull of gravity. She didn't manipulate the paint's "fall," because she was interested giving up control and letting chance take over.
Who is this?
That is William Penn, Quaker and founding father of the state of Pennsylvania. This window was probably shown to the leaders of the Plymouth Church of the Pilgrims, in Brooklyn Heights, for approval to proceed with the extant, large window titled "William Penn, Peace Movement, Pennsylvania" that the Stained Glass Studio executed for the church. Penn is depicted in this window because, like Plymouth Church's first pastor, Henry Ward Beecher, he too was an early opponent of slavery. This gives the subject social meaning for the congregation.
Where is this?
You may have read this already on the label for that painting, but if you look very, very closely, you can just make out two smokestacks from New Jersey in the sunrise haze in the distance.
George Inness lived near the town of Montclair, New Jersey, and those smokestacks were part of a printing factory near the artist's home.
What is this?
It is a mask created by people in the Mau culture in northern Africa. It was used in a secret society known as "koma." Only those initiated into the special society were even allowed to see this mask! Many materials were added to this mask to imbue it with spiritual power. There is even an area near the mouth where a bundle of medicinal ingredients would be added to add spiritual power to the mask.
What is this?
This is a ceremonial house figure and it has so many different animals and figures depicted on it. Organic materials help imbue this object with a special presence. After being carved in the woods, the figure would be coated in mud and painted.
What is that?
That is actually a type of piano/harpsicord called a "Spinet."
Can you tell me more about the sugar industry and its history?
Most sugar production was done on cane plantations in the Caribbean and Brazil, and the plantations were worked on by slaves. That's the general, broad-sweeping overview of the history of the sugar industry. Wealthy Europeans and American land-owners profited off of the slave-labor and the increasing global demand for sugar.
There is another tea set in this room which shows a teapot from 1876 in this room with a Chinese man's head and a sugar bowl with a Black man's head on the lid. The connection between sugar production and slavery was inherent and clear.
Okay, thank you! That helps a lot and totally makes sense. I felt like I didn't really understand the ways in which the industry functioned and for how long etc. but I think it makes more sense now that it was slave labor that made it so exploitative.
Kara Walker's work is incredible at addressing the cruelty of slavery. I wish we had her silhouette works on view, but they're currently not up. There's a really powerful painting in the American Art galleries (also on the 5th floor) that shows a family riding on a horse escaping slave conditions in the south. The artist Eastman Johnson saw the scene first-hand and was so emotionally moved he created the painting. It's called "A Ride for Liberty."
Wow. How did the vase get this rich blue color?
That is made of a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling).  The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Hi, I'm writing a paper on Teti's coffin and I need some help. Could you tell me what some of the symbols mean?
There is so much to see on it--do you see those two big black dogs on the top? Those are representations of the god Anubis, Anubis was the guardian of mummies and he was responsible for escorting souls to the netherworld.
This looks like an eagle, what does it represent?
That is actually a falcon and falcons represent the god Horus. Horus symbolizes order over chaos.
Thanks! What is this eye for?
You will see that eye on many of the coffins--it's called a wedjat-eye or the eye of Horus. These eyes were painted on coffins because it was believed they would allow the deceased to see and participate in funerary rituals. They were painted so that when the person was buried they would always face east toward the rising sun.
Wow. What is this bird for?
That bird represents the goddess Nekhbet and she spreads her wings across the chest of the deceased to protect the mummy.
Is this Anubis too?
Anubis as the jackal on top of an image of a sarcophagus shows him protecting the body during its journey in the afterlife.
Are there any other coffins like this at Brooklyn that I could look at?
There is a whole mummy chamber in the back of the galleries and on your way there the Coffin of Nespanetjerenpere is a good one to check out.
Do we know who painted Teti's coffin and why it is painted so detailed?
Coffins were very important and they were all created with great care--there were many images and prayers you would want on your coffin to ensure you made it safely to the afterlife. In fact, Teti spent one year's salary on his coffin.
One year's salary? Wow.
Yes--that alone shows you how important it was! I can't think of anything I would spend one year's salary on.
Was anything buried with him?
I don't think we know exactly what Teti was buried with but Ancient Egyptians were usually buried with offerings for use by the deceased in the afterlife.
Can you please tell me more about Teti's coffin.
I can tell you that Teti was an artisan who painted tombs in the Valley of the Kings. He paid nearly a year's salary for this coffin, which is made of wood and has five different colors on it.
One particularly interesting fact is that over time, we see more and more people with elaborately decorated coffins. By the New Kingdom, middle ranks of society were able to afford coffins inscribed with parts of 'The Book of the Dead' inscribed on funerary objects. So here, Teti has on the side of his coffin one of the spells from the Book of the Dead. You'll also see four different figures on the side, let me know when you can see them. They're all to the left of the big Wedjat eye.
So let me tell you about them, you see the one all the way to the left, with the bird's head? That's the god Thoth, with the head of an Ibis bird, he's the god of hieroglyphs, writing, and generally wisdom. After him comes the human-headed god Kebehsenuef, who was one of Horus' sons. Then comes Anubis, the god of mummification. He's the one who would weigh the heart of the person traveling through the underworld. You'll see other jackals, who represent Anubis, at the top of the coffin as well. The last one all the way to the right, is Hapi, another son of Horus, who is associated with the Nile and fertility. All together they are depicted as reciting this spell from 'The Book of the Dead' in order to protect Teti's body.
I actually found the text that they are all saying in the hieroglyphs! Here is what Kebehsenuef is saying: 'I am your son, Osiris, I have come to be your protection I have united your bones for you, I have assembled your limbs for you I have brought you your heart, and placed it for you at its place in your body I have strengthened your house after you, as you live, eternally.' And next to Hapi is written: "I have come to be your protection I have bound your head and your limbs for you I have smitten you enemies beneath you for you, and given you your head, eternally.'
I can tell you that I got some of the information from our website, some from our publication 'To Live Forever' written by our curator Dr. Edward Bleiberg, and the translation of 'The Book of the Dead' from the University College of London website.
What is the waterfall supposed to represent?
This piece is called "Everlasting Waterfall" and was inspired by Steir's interest in both landscape as imagery and the liquid properties of paint. You may have already found the label, but it outlines how the artist applied a number of horizontal brushstrokes loaded with thinned paint along the top edge of the canvas, and the paint streamed down in lines, drips, and, rivulets, just like water would.
Her subject is partly the natural landscape. Her subject could also be paint itself: its physical properties and how what it does when it's allowed to follow the pull of gravity. She didn't manipulate the paint's "fall," because she was interested giving up control and letting chance take over.
Who is this?
That is William Penn, Quaker and founding father of the state of Pennsylvania. This window was probably shown to the leaders of the Plymouth Church of the Pilgrims, in Brooklyn Heights, for approval to proceed with the extant, large window titled "William Penn, Peace Movement, Pennsylvania" that the Stained Glass Studio executed for the church. Penn is depicted in this window because, like Plymouth Church's first pastor, Henry Ward Beecher, he too was an early opponent of slavery. This gives the subject social meaning for the congregation.
Where is this?
You may have read this already on the label for that painting, but if you look very, very closely, you can just make out two smokestacks from New Jersey in the sunrise haze in the distance.
George Inness lived near the town of Montclair, New Jersey, and those smokestacks were part of a printing factory near the artist's home.
What is this?
It is a mask created by people in the Mau culture in northern Africa. It was used in a secret society known as "koma." Only those initiated into the special society were even allowed to see this mask! Many materials were added to this mask to imbue it with spiritual power. There is even an area near the mouth where a bundle of medicinal ingredients would be added to add spiritual power to the mask.
What is this?
This is a ceremonial house figure and it has so many different animals and figures depicted on it. Organic materials help imbue this object with a special presence. After being carved in the woods, the figure would be coated in mud and painted.
What is that?
That is actually a type of piano/harpsicord called a "Spinet."
Can you tell me more about the sugar industry and its history?
Most sugar production was done on cane plantations in the Caribbean and Brazil, and the plantations were worked on by slaves. That's the general, broad-sweeping overview of the history of the sugar industry. Wealthy Europeans and American land-owners profited off of the slave-labor and the increasing global demand for sugar.
There is another tea set in this room which shows a teapot from 1876 in this room with a Chinese man's head and a sugar bowl with a Black man's head on the lid. The connection between sugar production and slavery was inherent and clear.
Okay, thank you! That helps a lot and totally makes sense. I felt like I didn't really understand the ways in which the industry functioned and for how long etc. but I think it makes more sense now that it was slave labor that made it so exploitative.
Kara Walker's work is incredible at addressing the cruelty of slavery. I wish we had her silhouette works on view, but they're currently not up. There's a really powerful painting in the American Art galleries (also on the 5th floor) that shows a family riding on a horse escaping slave conditions in the south. The artist Eastman Johnson saw the scene first-hand and was so emotionally moved he created the painting. It's called "A Ride for Liberty."
Wow. How did the vase get this rich blue color?
That is made of a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling).  The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Hi, I'm writing a paper on Teti's coffin and I need some help. Could you tell me what some of the symbols mean?
There is so much to see on it--do you see those two big black dogs on the top? Those are representations of the god Anubis, Anubis was the guardian of mummies and he was responsible for escorting souls to the netherworld.
This looks like an eagle, what does it represent?
That is actually a falcon and falcons represent the god Horus. Horus symbolizes order over chaos.
Thanks! What is this eye for?
You will see that eye on many of the coffins--it's called a wedjat-eye or the eye of Horus. These eyes were painted on coffins because it was believed they would allow the deceased to see and participate in funerary rituals. They were painted so that when the person was buried they would always face east toward the rising sun.
Wow. What is this bird for?
That bird represents the goddess Nekhbet and she spreads her wings across the chest of the deceased to protect the mummy.
Is this Anubis too?
Anubis as the jackal on top of an image of a sarcophagus shows him protecting the body during its journey in the afterlife.
Are there any other coffins like this at Brooklyn that I could look at?
There is a whole mummy chamber in the back of the galleries and on your way there the Coffin of Nespanetjerenpere is a good one to check out.
Do we know who painted Teti's coffin and why it is painted so detailed?
Coffins were very important and they were all created with great care--there were many images and prayers you would want on your coffin to ensure you made it safely to the afterlife. In fact, Teti spent one year's salary on his coffin.
One year's salary? Wow.
Yes--that alone shows you how important it was! I can't think of anything I would spend one year's salary on.
Was anything buried with him?
I don't think we know exactly what Teti was buried with but Ancient Egyptians were usually buried with offerings for use by the deceased in the afterlife.
Can you please tell me more about Teti's coffin.
I can tell you that Teti was an artisan who painted tombs in the Valley of the Kings. He paid nearly a year's salary for this coffin, which is made of wood and has five different colors on it.
One particularly interesting fact is that over time, we see more and more people with elaborately decorated coffins. By the New Kingdom, middle ranks of society were able to afford coffins inscribed with parts of 'The Book of the Dead' inscribed on funerary objects. So here, Teti has on the side of his coffin one of the spells from the Book of the Dead. You'll also see four different figures on the side, let me know when you can see them. They're all to the left of the big Wedjat eye.
So let me tell you about them, you see the one all the way to the left, with the bird's head? That's the god Thoth, with the head of an Ibis bird, he's the god of hieroglyphs, writing, and generally wisdom. After him comes the human-headed god Kebehsenuef, who was one of Horus' sons. Then comes Anubis, the god of mummification. He's the one who would weigh the heart of the person traveling through the underworld. You'll see other jackals, who represent Anubis, at the top of the coffin as well. The last one all the way to the right, is Hapi, another son of Horus, who is associated with the Nile and fertility. All together they are depicted as reciting this spell from 'The Book of the Dead' in order to protect Teti's body.
I actually found the text that they are all saying in the hieroglyphs! Here is what Kebehsenuef is saying: 'I am your son, Osiris, I have come to be your protection I have united your bones for you, I have assembled your limbs for you I have brought you your heart, and placed it for you at its place in your body I have strengthened your house after you, as you live, eternally.' And next to Hapi is written: "I have come to be your protection I have bound your head and your limbs for you I have smitten you enemies beneath you for you, and given you your head, eternally.'
I can tell you that I got some of the information from our website, some from our publication 'To Live Forever' written by our curator Dr. Edward Bleiberg, and the translation of 'The Book of the Dead' from the University College of London website.
What is the waterfall supposed to represent?
This piece is called "Everlasting Waterfall" and was inspired by Steir's interest in both landscape as imagery and the liquid properties of paint. You may have already found the label, but it outlines how the artist applied a number of horizontal brushstrokes loaded with thinned paint along the top edge of the canvas, and the paint streamed down in lines, drips, and, rivulets, just like water would.
Her subject is partly the natural landscape. Her subject could also be paint itself: its physical properties and how what it does when it's allowed to follow the pull of gravity. She didn't manipulate the paint's "fall," because she was interested giving up control and letting chance take over.
Who is this?
That is William Penn, Quaker and founding father of the state of Pennsylvania. This window was probably shown to the leaders of the Plymouth Church of the Pilgrims, in Brooklyn Heights, for approval to proceed with the extant, large window titled "William Penn, Peace Movement, Pennsylvania" that the Stained Glass Studio executed for the church. Penn is depicted in this window because, like Plymouth Church's first pastor, Henry Ward Beecher, he too was an early opponent of slavery. This gives the subject social meaning for the congregation.
Where is this?
You may have read this already on the label for that painting, but if you look very, very closely, you can just make out two smokestacks from New Jersey in the sunrise haze in the distance.
George Inness lived near the town of Montclair, New Jersey, and those smokestacks were part of a printing factory near the artist's home.
What is this?
It is a mask created by people in the Mau culture in northern Africa. It was used in a secret society known as "koma." Only those initiated into the special society were even allowed to see this mask! Many materials were added to this mask to imbue it with spiritual power. There is even an area near the mouth where a bundle of medicinal ingredients would be added to add spiritual power to the mask.
What is this?
This is a ceremonial house figure and it has so many different animals and figures depicted on it. Organic materials help imbue this object with a special presence. After being carved in the woods, the figure would be coated in mud and painted.
What is that?
That is actually a type of piano/harpsicord called a "Spinet."
Can you tell me more about the sugar industry and its history?
Most sugar production was done on cane plantations in the Caribbean and Brazil, and the plantations were worked on by slaves. That's the general, broad-sweeping overview of the history of the sugar industry. Wealthy Europeans and American land-owners profited off of the slave-labor and the increasing global demand for sugar.
There is another tea set in this room which shows a teapot from 1876 in this room with a Chinese man's head and a sugar bowl with a Black man's head on the lid. The connection between sugar production and slavery was inherent and clear.
Okay, thank you! That helps a lot and totally makes sense. I felt like I didn't really understand the ways in which the industry functioned and for how long etc. but I think it makes more sense now that it was slave labor that made it so exploitative.
Kara Walker's work is incredible at addressing the cruelty of slavery. I wish we had her silhouette works on view, but they're currently not up. There's a really powerful painting in the American Art galleries (also on the 5th floor) that shows a family riding on a horse escaping slave conditions in the south. The artist Eastman Johnson saw the scene first-hand and was so emotionally moved he created the painting. It's called "A Ride for Liberty."
Wow. How did the vase get this rich blue color?
That is made of a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling).  The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Have small plates, dinner, or drinks at The Norm restaurant and bar, led by Michelin-starred Chef Saul Bolton. Or stop by the BKM Café or Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group.

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Hi, I'm writing a paper on Teti's coffin and I need some help. Could you tell me what some of the symbols mean?
There is so much to see on it--do you see those two big black dogs on the top? Those are representations of the god Anubis, Anubis was the guardian of mummies and he was responsible for escorting souls to the netherworld.
This looks like an eagle, what does it represent?
That is actually a falcon and falcons represent the god Horus. Horus symbolizes order over chaos.
Thanks! What is this eye for?
You will see that eye on many of the coffins--it's called a wedjat-eye or the eye of Horus. These eyes were painted on coffins because it was believed they would allow the deceased to see and participate in funerary rituals. They were painted so that when the person was buried they would always face east toward the rising sun.
Wow. What is this bird for?
That bird represents the goddess Nekhbet and she spreads her wings across the chest of the deceased to protect the mummy.
Is this Anubis too?
Anubis as the jackal on top of an image of a sarcophagus shows him protecting the body during its journey in the afterlife.
Are there any other coffins like this at Brooklyn that I could look at?
There is a whole mummy chamber in the back of the galleries and on your way there the Coffin of Nespanetjerenpere is a good one to check out.
Do we know who painted Teti's coffin and why it is painted so detailed?
Coffins were very important and they were all created with great care--there were many images and prayers you would want on your coffin to ensure you made it safely to the afterlife. In fact, Teti spent one year's salary on his coffin.
One year's salary? Wow.
Yes--that alone shows you how important it was! I can't think of anything I would spend one year's salary on.
Was anything buried with him?
I don't think we know exactly what Teti was buried with but Ancient Egyptians were usually buried with offerings for use by the deceased in the afterlife.
Can you please tell me more about Teti's coffin.
I can tell you that Teti was an artisan who painted tombs in the Valley of the Kings. He paid nearly a year's salary for this coffin, which is made of wood and has five different colors on it.
One particularly interesting fact is that over time, we see more and more people with elaborately decorated coffins. By the New Kingdom, middle ranks of society were able to afford coffins inscribed with parts of 'The Book of the Dead' inscribed on funerary objects. So here, Teti has on the side of his coffin one of the spells from the Book of the Dead. You'll also see four different figures on the side, let me know when you can see them. They're all to the left of the big Wedjat eye.
So let me tell you about them, you see the one all the way to the left, with the bird's head? That's the god Thoth, with the head of an Ibis bird, he's the god of hieroglyphs, writing, and generally wisdom. After him comes the human-headed god Kebehsenuef, who was one of Horus' sons. Then comes Anubis, the god of mummification. He's the one who would weigh the heart of the person traveling through the underworld. You'll see other jackals, who represent Anubis, at the top of the coffin as well. The last one all the way to the right, is Hapi, another son of Horus, who is associated with the Nile and fertility. All together they are depicted as reciting this spell from 'The Book of the Dead' in order to protect Teti's body.
I actually found the text that they are all saying in the hieroglyphs! Here is what Kebehsenuef is saying: 'I am your son, Osiris, I have come to be your protection I have united your bones for you, I have assembled your limbs for you I have brought you your heart, and placed it for you at its place in your body I have strengthened your house after you, as you live, eternally.' And next to Hapi is written: "I have come to be your protection I have bound your head and your limbs for you I have smitten you enemies beneath you for you, and given you your head, eternally.'
I can tell you that I got some of the information from our website, some from our publication 'To Live Forever' written by our curator Dr. Edward Bleiberg, and the translation of 'The Book of the Dead' from the University College of London website.
What is the waterfall supposed to represent?
This piece is called "Everlasting Waterfall" and was inspired by Steir's interest in both landscape as imagery and the liquid properties of paint. You may have already found the label, but it outlines how the artist applied a number of horizontal brushstrokes loaded with thinned paint along the top edge of the canvas, and the paint streamed down in lines, drips, and, rivulets, just like water would.
Her subject is partly the natural landscape. Her subject could also be paint itself: its physical properties and how what it does when it's allowed to follow the pull of gravity. She didn't manipulate the paint's "fall," because she was interested giving up control and letting chance take over.
Who is this?
That is William Penn, Quaker and founding father of the state of Pennsylvania. This window was probably shown to the leaders of the Plymouth Church of the Pilgrims, in Brooklyn Heights, for approval to proceed with the extant, large window titled "William Penn, Peace Movement, Pennsylvania" that the Stained Glass Studio executed for the church. Penn is depicted in this window because, like Plymouth Church's first pastor, Henry Ward Beecher, he too was an early opponent of slavery. This gives the subject social meaning for the congregation.
Where is this?
You may have read this already on the label for that painting, but if you look very, very closely, you can just make out two smokestacks from New Jersey in the sunrise haze in the distance.
George Inness lived near the town of Montclair, New Jersey, and those smokestacks were part of a printing factory near the artist's home.
What is this?
It is a mask created by people in the Mau culture in northern Africa. It was used in a secret society known as "koma." Only those initiated into the special society were even allowed to see this mask! Many materials were added to this mask to imbue it with spiritual power. There is even an area near the mouth where a bundle of medicinal ingredients would be added to add spiritual power to the mask.
What is this?
This is a ceremonial house figure and it has so many different animals and figures depicted on it. Organic materials help imbue this object with a special presence. After being carved in the woods, the figure would be coated in mud and painted.
What is that?
That is actually a type of piano/harpsicord called a "Spinet."
Can you tell me more about the sugar industry and its history?
Most sugar production was done on cane plantations in the Caribbean and Brazil, and the plantations were worked on by slaves. That's the general, broad-sweeping overview of the history of the sugar industry. Wealthy Europeans and American land-owners profited off of the slave-labor and the increasing global demand for sugar.
There is another tea set in this room which shows a teapot from 1876 in this room with a Chinese man's head and a sugar bowl with a Black man's head on the lid. The connection between sugar production and slavery was inherent and clear.
Okay, thank you! That helps a lot and totally makes sense. I felt like I didn't really understand the ways in which the industry functioned and for how long etc. but I think it makes more sense now that it was slave labor that made it so exploitative.
Kara Walker's work is incredible at addressing the cruelty of slavery. I wish we had her silhouette works on view, but they're currently not up. There's a really powerful painting in the American Art galleries (also on the 5th floor) that shows a family riding on a horse escaping slave conditions in the south. The artist Eastman Johnson saw the scene first-hand and was so emotionally moved he created the painting. It's called "A Ride for Liberty."
Wow. How did the vase get this rich blue color?
That is made of a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling).  The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Hi, I'm writing a paper on Teti's coffin and I need some help. Could you tell me what some of the symbols mean?
There is so much to see on it--do you see those two big black dogs on the top? Those are representations of the god Anubis, Anubis was the guardian of mummies and he was responsible for escorting souls to the netherworld.
This looks like an eagle, what does it represent?
That is actually a falcon and falcons represent the god Horus. Horus symbolizes order over chaos.
Thanks! What is this eye for?
You will see that eye on many of the coffins--it's called a wedjat-eye or the eye of Horus. These eyes were painted on coffins because it was believed they would allow the deceased to see and participate in funerary rituals. They were painted so that when the person was buried they would always face east toward the rising sun.
Wow. What is this bird for?
That bird represents the goddess Nekhbet and she spreads her wings across the chest of the deceased to protect the mummy.
Is this Anubis too?
Anubis as the jackal on top of an image of a sarcophagus shows him protecting the body during its journey in the afterlife.
Are there any other coffins like this at Brooklyn that I could look at?
There is a whole mummy chamber in the back of the galleries and on your way there the Coffin of Nespanetjerenpere is a good one to check out.
Do we know who painted Teti's coffin and why it is painted so detailed?
Coffins were very important and they were all created with great care--there were many images and prayers you would want on your coffin to ensure you made it safely to the afterlife. In fact, Teti spent one year's salary on his coffin.
One year's salary? Wow.
Yes--that alone shows you how important it was! I can't think of anything I would spend one year's salary on.
Was anything buried with him?
I don't think we know exactly what Teti was buried with but Ancient Egyptians were usually buried with offerings for use by the deceased in the afterlife.
Can you please tell me more about Teti's coffin.
I can tell you that Teti was an artisan who painted tombs in the Valley of the Kings. He paid nearly a year's salary for this coffin, which is made of wood and has five different colors on it.
One particularly interesting fact is that over time, we see more and more people with elaborately decorated coffins. By the New Kingdom, middle ranks of society were able to afford coffins inscribed with parts of 'The Book of the Dead' inscribed on funerary objects. So here, Teti has on the side of his coffin one of the spells from the Book of the Dead. You'll also see four different figures on the side, let me know when you can see them. They're all to the left of the big Wedjat eye.
So let me tell you about them, you see the one all the way to the left, with the bird's head? That's the god Thoth, with the head of an Ibis bird, he's the god of hieroglyphs, writing, and generally wisdom. After him comes the human-headed god Kebehsenuef, who was one of Horus' sons. Then comes Anubis, the god of mummification. He's the one who would weigh the heart of the person traveling through the underworld. You'll see other jackals, who represent Anubis, at the top of the coffin as well. The last one all the way to the right, is Hapi, another son of Horus, who is associated with the Nile and fertility. All together they are depicted as reciting this spell from 'The Book of the Dead' in order to protect Teti's body.
I actually found the text that they are all saying in the hieroglyphs! Here is what Kebehsenuef is saying: 'I am your son, Osiris, I have come to be your protection I have united your bones for you, I have assembled your limbs for you I have brought you your heart, and placed it for you at its place in your body I have strengthened your house after you, as you live, eternally.' And next to Hapi is written: "I have come to be your protection I have bound your head and your limbs for you I have smitten you enemies beneath you for you, and given you your head, eternally.'
I can tell you that I got some of the information from our website, some from our publication 'To Live Forever' written by our curator Dr. Edward Bleiberg, and the translation of 'The Book of the Dead' from the University College of London website.
What is the waterfall supposed to represent?
This piece is called "Everlasting Waterfall" and was inspired by Steir's interest in both landscape as imagery and the liquid properties of paint. You may have already found the label, but it outlines how the artist applied a number of horizontal brushstrokes loaded with thinned paint along the top edge of the canvas, and the paint streamed down in lines, drips, and, rivulets, just like water would.
Her subject is partly the natural landscape. Her subject could also be paint itself: its physical properties and how what it does when it's allowed to follow the pull of gravity. She didn't manipulate the paint's "fall," because she was interested giving up control and letting chance take over.
Who is this?
That is William Penn, Quaker and founding father of the state of Pennsylvania. This window was probably shown to the leaders of the Plymouth Church of the Pilgrims, in Brooklyn Heights, for approval to proceed with the extant, large window titled "William Penn, Peace Movement, Pennsylvania" that the Stained Glass Studio executed for the church. Penn is depicted in this window because, like Plymouth Church's first pastor, Henry Ward Beecher, he too was an early opponent of slavery. This gives the subject social meaning for the congregation.
Where is this?
You may have read this already on the label for that painting, but if you look very, very closely, you can just make out two smokestacks from New Jersey in the sunrise haze in the distance.
George Inness lived near the town of Montclair, New Jersey, and those smokestacks were part of a printing factory near the artist's home.
What is this?
It is a mask created by people in the Mau culture in northern Africa. It was used in a secret society known as "koma." Only those initiated into the special society were even allowed to see this mask! Many materials were added to this mask to imbue it with spiritual power. There is even an area near the mouth where a bundle of medicinal ingredients would be added to add spiritual power to the mask.
What is this?
This is a ceremonial house figure and it has so many different animals and figures depicted on it. Organic materials help imbue this object with a special presence. After being carved in the woods, the figure would be coated in mud and painted.
What is that?
That is actually a type of piano/harpsicord called a "Spinet."
Can you tell me more about the sugar industry and its history?
Most sugar production was done on cane plantations in the Caribbean and Brazil, and the plantations were worked on by slaves. That's the general, broad-sweeping overview of the history of the sugar industry. Wealthy Europeans and American land-owners profited off of the slave-labor and the increasing global demand for sugar.
There is another tea set in this room which shows a teapot from 1876 in this room with a Chinese man's head and a sugar bowl with a Black man's head on the lid. The connection between sugar production and slavery was inherent and clear.
Okay, thank you! That helps a lot and totally makes sense. I felt like I didn't really understand the ways in which the industry functioned and for how long etc. but I think it makes more sense now that it was slave labor that made it so exploitative.
Kara Walker's work is incredible at addressing the cruelty of slavery. I wish we had her silhouette works on view, but they're currently not up. There's a really powerful painting in the American Art galleries (also on the 5th floor) that shows a family riding on a horse escaping slave conditions in the south. The artist Eastman Johnson saw the scene first-hand and was so emotionally moved he created the painting. It's called "A Ride for Liberty."
Wow. How did the vase get this rich blue color?
That is made of a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling).  The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Hi, I'm writing a paper on Teti's coffin and I need some help. Could you tell me what some of the symbols mean?
There is so much to see on it--do you see those two big black dogs on the top? Those are representations of the god Anubis, Anubis was the guardian of mummies and he was responsible for escorting souls to the netherworld.
This looks like an eagle, what does it represent?
That is actually a falcon and falcons represent the god Horus. Horus symbolizes order over chaos.
Thanks! What is this eye for?
You will see that eye on many of the coffins--it's called a wedjat-eye or the eye of Horus. These eyes were painted on coffins because it was believed they would allow the deceased to see and participate in funerary rituals. They were painted so that when the person was buried they would always face east toward the rising sun.
Wow. What is this bird for?
That bird represents the goddess Nekhbet and she spreads her wings across the chest of the deceased to protect the mummy.
Is this Anubis too?
Anubis as the jackal on top of an image of a sarcophagus shows him protecting the body during its journey in the afterlife.
Are there any other coffins like this at Brooklyn that I could look at?
There is a whole mummy chamber in the back of the galleries and on your way there the Coffin of Nespanetjerenpere is a good one to check out.
Do we know who painted Teti's coffin and why it is painted so detailed?
Coffins were very important and they were all created with great care--there were many images and prayers you would want on your coffin to ensure you made it safely to the afterlife. In fact, Teti spent one year's salary on his coffin.
One year's salary? Wow.
Yes--that alone shows you how important it was! I can't think of anything I would spend one year's salary on.
Was anything buried with him?
I don't think we know exactly what Teti was buried with but Ancient Egyptians were usually buried with offerings for use by the deceased in the afterlife.
Can you please tell me more about Teti's coffin.
I can tell you that Teti was an artisan who painted tombs in the Valley of the Kings. He paid nearly a year's salary for this coffin, which is made of wood and has five different colors on it.
One particularly interesting fact is that over time, we see more and more people with elaborately decorated coffins. By the New Kingdom, middle ranks of society were able to afford coffins inscribed with parts of 'The Book of the Dead' inscribed on funerary objects. So here, Teti has on the side of his coffin one of the spells from the Book of the Dead. You'll also see four different figures on the side, let me know when you can see them. They're all to the left of the big Wedjat eye.
So let me tell you about them, you see the one all the way to the left, with the bird's head? That's the god Thoth, with the head of an Ibis bird, he's the god of hieroglyphs, writing, and generally wisdom. After him comes the human-headed god Kebehsenuef, who was one of Horus' sons. Then comes Anubis, the god of mummification. He's the one who would weigh the heart of the person traveling through the underworld. You'll see other jackals, who represent Anubis, at the top of the coffin as well. The last one all the way to the right, is Hapi, another son of Horus, who is associated with the Nile and fertility. All together they are depicted as reciting this spell from 'The Book of the Dead' in order to protect Teti's body.
I actually found the text that they are all saying in the hieroglyphs! Here is what Kebehsenuef is saying: 'I am your son, Osiris, I have come to be your protection I have united your bones for you, I have assembled your limbs for you I have brought you your heart, and placed it for you at its place in your body I have strengthened your house after you, as you live, eternally.' And next to Hapi is written: "I have come to be your protection I have bound your head and your limbs for you I have smitten you enemies beneath you for you, and given you your head, eternally.'
I can tell you that I got some of the information from our website, some from our publication 'To Live Forever' written by our curator Dr. Edward Bleiberg, and the translation of 'The Book of the Dead' from the University College of London website.
What is the waterfall supposed to represent?
This piece is called "Everlasting Waterfall" and was inspired by Steir's interest in both landscape as imagery and the liquid properties of paint. You may have already found the label, but it outlines how the artist applied a number of horizontal brushstrokes loaded with thinned paint along the top edge of the canvas, and the paint streamed down in lines, drips, and, rivulets, just like water would.
Her subject is partly the natural landscape. Her subject could also be paint itself: its physical properties and how what it does when it's allowed to follow the pull of gravity. She didn't manipulate the paint's "fall," because she was interested giving up control and letting chance take over.
Who is this?
That is William Penn, Quaker and founding father of the state of Pennsylvania. This window was probably shown to the leaders of the Plymouth Church of the Pilgrims, in Brooklyn Heights, for approval to proceed with the extant, large window titled "William Penn, Peace Movement, Pennsylvania" that the Stained Glass Studio executed for the church. Penn is depicted in this window because, like Plymouth Church's first pastor, Henry Ward Beecher, he too was an early opponent of slavery. This gives the subject social meaning for the congregation.
Where is this?
You may have read this already on the label for that painting, but if you look very, very closely, you can just make out two smokestacks from New Jersey in the sunrise haze in the distance.
George Inness lived near the town of Montclair, New Jersey, and those smokestacks were part of a printing factory near the artist's home.
What is this?
It is a mask created by people in the Mau culture in northern Africa. It was used in a secret society known as "koma." Only those initiated into the special society were even allowed to see this mask! Many materials were added to this mask to imbue it with spiritual power. There is even an area near the mouth where a bundle of medicinal ingredients would be added to add spiritual power to the mask.
What is this?
This is a ceremonial house figure and it has so many different animals and figures depicted on it. Organic materials help imbue this object with a special presence. After being carved in the woods, the figure would be coated in mud and painted.
What is that?
That is actually a type of piano/harpsicord called a "Spinet."
Can you tell me more about the sugar industry and its history?
Most sugar production was done on cane plantations in the Caribbean and Brazil, and the plantations were worked on by slaves. That's the general, broad-sweeping overview of the history of the sugar industry. Wealthy Europeans and American land-owners profited off of the slave-labor and the increasing global demand for sugar.
There is another tea set in this room which shows a teapot from 1876 in this room with a Chinese man's head and a sugar bowl with a Black man's head on the lid. The connection between sugar production and slavery was inherent and clear.
Okay, thank you! That helps a lot and totally makes sense. I felt like I didn't really understand the ways in which the industry functioned and for how long etc. but I think it makes more sense now that it was slave labor that made it so exploitative.
Kara Walker's work is incredible at addressing the cruelty of slavery. I wish we had her silhouette works on view, but they're currently not up. There's a really powerful painting in the American Art galleries (also on the 5th floor) that shows a family riding on a horse escaping slave conditions in the south. The artist Eastman Johnson saw the scene first-hand and was so emotionally moved he created the painting. It's called "A Ride for Liberty."
Wow. How did the vase get this rich blue color?
That is made of a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling).  The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (The Norm restaurant and bar; BKM Café and Bowl)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Hi, I'm writing a paper on Teti's coffin and I need some help. Could you tell me what some of the symbols mean?
There is so much to see on it--do you see those two big black dogs on the top? Those are representations of the god Anubis, Anubis was the guardian of mummies and he was responsible for escorting souls to the netherworld.
This looks like an eagle, what does it represent?
That is actually a falcon and falcons represent the god Horus. Horus symbolizes order over chaos.
Thanks! What is this eye for?
You will see that eye on many of the coffins--it's called a wedjat-eye or the eye of Horus. These eyes were painted on coffins because it was believed they would allow the deceased to see and participate in funerary rituals. They were painted so that when the person was buried they would always face east toward the rising sun.
Wow. What is this bird for?
That bird represents the goddess Nekhbet and she spreads her wings across the chest of the deceased to protect the mummy.
Is this Anubis too?
Anubis as the jackal on top of an image of a sarcophagus shows him protecting the body during its journey in the afterlife.
Are there any other coffins like this at Brooklyn that I could look at?
There is a whole mummy chamber in the back of the galleries and on your way there the Coffin of Nespanetjerenpere is a good one to check out.
Do we know who painted Teti's coffin and why it is painted so detailed?
Coffins were very important and they were all created with great care--there were many images and prayers you would want on your coffin to ensure you made it safely to the afterlife. In fact, Teti spent one year's salary on his coffin.
One year's salary? Wow.
Yes--that alone shows you how important it was! I can't think of anything I would spend one year's salary on.
Was anything buried with him?
I don't think we know exactly what Teti was buried with but Ancient Egyptians were usually buried with offerings for use by the deceased in the afterlife.
Can you please tell me more about Teti's coffin.
I can tell you that Teti was an artisan who painted tombs in the Valley of the Kings. He paid nearly a year's salary for this coffin, which is made of wood and has five different colors on it.
One particularly interesting fact is that over time, we see more and more people with elaborately decorated coffins. By the New Kingdom, middle ranks of society were able to afford coffins inscribed with parts of 'The Book of the Dead' inscribed on funerary objects. So here, Teti has on the side of his coffin one of the spells from the Book of the Dead. You'll also see four different figures on the side, let me know when you can see them. They're all to the left of the big Wedjat eye.
So let me tell you about them, you see the one all the way to the left, with the bird's head? That's the god Thoth, with the head of an Ibis bird, he's the god of hieroglyphs, writing, and generally wisdom. After him comes the human-headed god Kebehsenuef, who was one of Horus' sons. Then comes Anubis, the god of mummification. He's the one who would weigh the heart of the person traveling through the underworld. You'll see other jackals, who represent Anubis, at the top of the coffin as well. The last one all the way to the right, is Hapi, another son of Horus, who is associated with the Nile and fertility. All together they are depicted as reciting this spell from 'The Book of the Dead' in order to protect Teti's body.
I actually found the text that they are all saying in the hieroglyphs! Here is what Kebehsenuef is saying: 'I am your son, Osiris, I have come to be your protection I have united your bones for you, I have assembled your limbs for you I have brought you your heart, and placed it for you at its place in your body I have strengthened your house after you, as you live, eternally.' And next to Hapi is written: "I have come to be your protection I have bound your head and your limbs for you I have smitten you enemies beneath you for you, and given you your head, eternally.'
I can tell you that I got some of the information from our website, some from our publication 'To Live Forever' written by our curator Dr. Edward Bleiberg, and the translation of 'The Book of the Dead' from the University College of London website.
What is the waterfall supposed to represent?
This piece is called "Everlasting Waterfall" and was inspired by Steir's interest in both landscape as imagery and the liquid properties of paint. You may have already found the label, but it outlines how the artist applied a number of horizontal brushstrokes loaded with thinned paint along the top edge of the canvas, and the paint streamed down in lines, drips, and, rivulets, just like water would.
Her subject is partly the natural landscape. Her subject could also be paint itself: its physical properties and how what it does when it's allowed to follow the pull of gravity. She didn't manipulate the paint's "fall," because she was interested giving up control and letting chance take over.
Who is this?
That is William Penn, Quaker and founding father of the state of Pennsylvania. This window was probably shown to the leaders of the Plymouth Church of the Pilgrims, in Brooklyn Heights, for approval to proceed with the extant, large window titled "William Penn, Peace Movement, Pennsylvania" that the Stained Glass Studio executed for the church. Penn is depicted in this window because, like Plymouth Church's first pastor, Henry Ward Beecher, he too was an early opponent of slavery. This gives the subject social meaning for the congregation.
Where is this?
You may have read this already on the label for that painting, but if you look very, very closely, you can just make out two smokestacks from New Jersey in the sunrise haze in the distance.
George Inness lived near the town of Montclair, New Jersey, and those smokestacks were part of a printing factory near the artist's home.
What is this?
It is a mask created by people in the Mau culture in northern Africa. It was used in a secret society known as "koma." Only those initiated into the special society were even allowed to see this mask! Many materials were added to this mask to imbue it with spiritual power. There is even an area near the mouth where a bundle of medicinal ingredients would be added to add spiritual power to the mask.
What is this?
This is a ceremonial house figure and it has so many different animals and figures depicted on it. Organic materials help imbue this object with a special presence. After being carved in the woods, the figure would be coated in mud and painted.
What is that?
That is actually a type of piano/harpsicord called a "Spinet."
Can you tell me more about the sugar industry and its history?
Most sugar production was done on cane plantations in the Caribbean and Brazil, and the plantations were worked on by slaves. That's the general, broad-sweeping overview of the history of the sugar industry. Wealthy Europeans and American land-owners profited off of the slave-labor and the increasing global demand for sugar.
There is another tea set in this room which shows a teapot from 1876 in this room with a Chinese man's head and a sugar bowl with a Black man's head on the lid. The connection between sugar production and slavery was inherent and clear.
Okay, thank you! That helps a lot and totally makes sense. I felt like I didn't really understand the ways in which the industry functioned and for how long etc. but I think it makes more sense now that it was slave labor that made it so exploitative.
Kara Walker's work is incredible at addressing the cruelty of slavery. I wish we had her silhouette works on view, but they're currently not up. There's a really powerful painting in the American Art galleries (also on the 5th floor) that shows a family riding on a horse escaping slave conditions in the south. The artist Eastman Johnson saw the scene first-hand and was so emotionally moved he created the painting. It's called "A Ride for Liberty."
Wow. How did the vase get this rich blue color?
That is made of a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling).  The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Hi, I'm writing a paper on Teti's coffin and I need some help. Could you tell me what some of the symbols mean?
There is so much to see on it--do you see those two big black dogs on the top? Those are representations of the god Anubis, Anubis was the guardian of mummies and he was responsible for escorting souls to the netherworld.
This looks like an eagle, what does it represent?
That is actually a falcon and falcons represent the god Horus. Horus symbolizes order over chaos.
Thanks! What is this eye for?
You will see that eye on many of the coffins--it's called a wedjat-eye or the eye of Horus. These eyes were painted on coffins because it was believed they would allow the deceased to see and participate in funerary rituals. They were painted so that when the person was buried they would always face east toward the rising sun.
Wow. What is this bird for?
That bird represents the goddess Nekhbet and she spreads her wings across the chest of the deceased to protect the mummy.
Is this Anubis too?
Anubis as the jackal on top of an image of a sarcophagus shows him protecting the body during its journey in the afterlife.
Are there any other coffins like this at Brooklyn that I could look at?
There is a whole mummy chamber in the back of the galleries and on your way there the Coffin of Nespanetjerenpere is a good one to check out.
Do we know who painted Teti's coffin and why it is painted so detailed?
Coffins were very important and they were all created with great care--there were many images and prayers you would want on your coffin to ensure you made it safely to the afterlife. In fact, Teti spent one year's salary on his coffin.
One year's salary? Wow.
Yes--that alone shows you how important it was! I can't think of anything I would spend one year's salary on.
Was anything buried with him?
I don't think we know exactly what Teti was buried with but Ancient Egyptians were usually buried with offerings for use by the deceased in the afterlife.
Can you please tell me more about Teti's coffin.
I can tell you that Teti was an artisan who painted tombs in the Valley of the Kings. He paid nearly a year's salary for this coffin, which is made of wood and has five different colors on it.
One particularly interesting fact is that over time, we see more and more people with elaborately decorated coffins. By the New Kingdom, middle ranks of society were able to afford coffins inscribed with parts of 'The Book of the Dead' inscribed on funerary objects. So here, Teti has on the side of his coffin one of the spells from the Book of the Dead. You'll also see four different figures on the side, let me know when you can see them. They're all to the left of the big Wedjat eye.
So let me tell you about them, you see the one all the way to the left, with the bird's head? That's the god Thoth, with the head of an Ibis bird, he's the god of hieroglyphs, writing, and generally wisdom. After him comes the human-headed god Kebehsenuef, who was one of Horus' sons. Then comes Anubis, the god of mummification. He's the one who would weigh the heart of the person traveling through the underworld. You'll see other jackals, who represent Anubis, at the top of the coffin as well. The last one all the way to the right, is Hapi, another son of Horus, who is associated with the Nile and fertility. All together they are depicted as reciting this spell from 'The Book of the Dead' in order to protect Teti's body.
I actually found the text that they are all saying in the hieroglyphs! Here is what Kebehsenuef is saying: 'I am your son, Osiris, I have come to be your protection I have united your bones for you, I have assembled your limbs for you I have brought you your heart, and placed it for you at its place in your body I have strengthened your house after you, as you live, eternally.' And next to Hapi is written: "I have come to be your protection I have bound your head and your limbs for you I have smitten you enemies beneath you for you, and given you your head, eternally.'
I can tell you that I got some of the information from our website, some from our publication 'To Live Forever' written by our curator Dr. Edward Bleiberg, and the translation of 'The Book of the Dead' from the University College of London website.
What is the waterfall supposed to represent?
This piece is called "Everlasting Waterfall" and was inspired by Steir's interest in both landscape as imagery and the liquid properties of paint. You may have already found the label, but it outlines how the artist applied a number of horizontal brushstrokes loaded with thinned paint along the top edge of the canvas, and the paint streamed down in lines, drips, and, rivulets, just like water would.
Her subject is partly the natural landscape. Her subject could also be paint itself: its physical properties and how what it does when it's allowed to follow the pull of gravity. She didn't manipulate the paint's "fall," because she was interested giving up control and letting chance take over.
Who is this?
That is William Penn, Quaker and founding father of the state of Pennsylvania. This window was probably shown to the leaders of the Plymouth Church of the Pilgrims, in Brooklyn Heights, for approval to proceed with the extant, large window titled "William Penn, Peace Movement, Pennsylvania" that the Stained Glass Studio executed for the church. Penn is depicted in this window because, like Plymouth Church's first pastor, Henry Ward Beecher, he too was an early opponent of slavery. This gives the subject social meaning for the congregation.
Where is this?
You may have read this already on the label for that painting, but if you look very, very closely, you can just make out two smokestacks from New Jersey in the sunrise haze in the distance.
George Inness lived near the town of Montclair, New Jersey, and those smokestacks were part of a printing factory near the artist's home.
What is this?
It is a mask created by people in the Mau culture in northern Africa. It was used in a secret society known as "koma." Only those initiated into the special society were even allowed to see this mask! Many materials were added to this mask to imbue it with spiritual power. There is even an area near the mouth where a bundle of medicinal ingredients would be added to add spiritual power to the mask.
What is this?
This is a ceremonial house figure and it has so many different animals and figures depicted on it. Organic materials help imbue this object with a special presence. After being carved in the woods, the figure would be coated in mud and painted.
What is that?
That is actually a type of piano/harpsicord called a "Spinet."
Can you tell me more about the sugar industry and its history?
Most sugar production was done on cane plantations in the Caribbean and Brazil, and the plantations were worked on by slaves. That's the general, broad-sweeping overview of the history of the sugar industry. Wealthy Europeans and American land-owners profited off of the slave-labor and the increasing global demand for sugar.
There is another tea set in this room which shows a teapot from 1876 in this room with a Chinese man's head and a sugar bowl with a Black man's head on the lid. The connection between sugar production and slavery was inherent and clear.
Okay, thank you! That helps a lot and totally makes sense. I felt like I didn't really understand the ways in which the industry functioned and for how long etc. but I think it makes more sense now that it was slave labor that made it so exploitative.
Kara Walker's work is incredible at addressing the cruelty of slavery. I wish we had her silhouette works on view, but they're currently not up. There's a really powerful painting in the American Art galleries (also on the 5th floor) that shows a family riding on a horse escaping slave conditions in the south. The artist Eastman Johnson saw the scene first-hand and was so emotionally moved he created the painting. It's called "A Ride for Liberty."
Wow. How did the vase get this rich blue color?
That is made of a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling).  The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Hi, I'm writing a paper on Teti's coffin and I need some help. Could you tell me what some of the symbols mean?
There is so much to see on it--do you see those two big black dogs on the top? Those are representations of the god Anubis, Anubis was the guardian of mummies and he was responsible for escorting souls to the netherworld.
This looks like an eagle, what does it represent?
That is actually a falcon and falcons represent the god Horus. Horus symbolizes order over chaos.
Thanks! What is this eye for?
You will see that eye on many of the coffins--it's called a wedjat-eye or the eye of Horus. These eyes were painted on coffins because it was believed they would allow the deceased to see and participate in funerary rituals. They were painted so that when the person was buried they would always face east toward the rising sun.
Wow. What is this bird for?
That bird represents the goddess Nekhbet and she spreads her wings across the chest of the deceased to protect the mummy.
Is this Anubis too?
Anubis as the jackal on top of an image of a sarcophagus shows him protecting the body during its journey in the afterlife.
Are there any other coffins like this at Brooklyn that I could look at?
There is a whole mummy chamber in the back of the galleries and on your way there the Coffin of Nespanetjerenpere is a good one to check out.
Do we know who painted Teti's coffin and why it is painted so detailed?
Coffins were very important and they were all created with great care--there were many images and prayers you would want on your coffin to ensure you made it safely to the afterlife. In fact, Teti spent one year's salary on his coffin.
One year's salary? Wow.
Yes--that alone shows you how important it was! I can't think of anything I would spend one year's salary on.
Was anything buried with him?
I don't think we know exactly what Teti was buried with but Ancient Egyptians were usually buried with offerings for use by the deceased in the afterlife.
Can you please tell me more about Teti's coffin.
I can tell you that Teti was an artisan who painted tombs in the Valley of the Kings. He paid nearly a year's salary for this coffin, which is made of wood and has five different colors on it.
One particularly interesting fact is that over time, we see more and more people with elaborately decorated coffins. By the New Kingdom, middle ranks of society were able to afford coffins inscribed with parts of 'The Book of the Dead' inscribed on funerary objects. So here, Teti has on the side of his coffin one of the spells from the Book of the Dead. You'll also see four different figures on the side, let me know when you can see them. They're all to the left of the big Wedjat eye.
So let me tell you about them, you see the one all the way to the left, with the bird's head? That's the god Thoth, with the head of an Ibis bird, he's the god of hieroglyphs, writing, and generally wisdom. After him comes the human-headed god Kebehsenuef, who was one of Horus' sons. Then comes Anubis, the god of mummification. He's the one who would weigh the heart of the person traveling through the underworld. You'll see other jackals, who represent Anubis, at the top of the coffin as well. The last one all the way to the right, is Hapi, another son of Horus, who is associated with the Nile and fertility. All together they are depicted as reciting this spell from 'The Book of the Dead' in order to protect Teti's body.
I actually found the text that they are all saying in the hieroglyphs! Here is what Kebehsenuef is saying: 'I am your son, Osiris, I have come to be your protection I have united your bones for you, I have assembled your limbs for you I have brought you your heart, and placed it for you at its place in your body I have strengthened your house after you, as you live, eternally.' And next to Hapi is written: "I have come to be your protection I have bound your head and your limbs for you I have smitten you enemies beneath you for you, and given you your head, eternally.'
I can tell you that I got some of the information from our website, some from our publication 'To Live Forever' written by our curator Dr. Edward Bleiberg, and the translation of 'The Book of the Dead' from the University College of London website.
What is the waterfall supposed to represent?
This piece is called "Everlasting Waterfall" and was inspired by Steir's interest in both landscape as imagery and the liquid properties of paint. You may have already found the label, but it outlines how the artist applied a number of horizontal brushstrokes loaded with thinned paint along the top edge of the canvas, and the paint streamed down in lines, drips, and, rivulets, just like water would.
Her subject is partly the natural landscape. Her subject could also be paint itself: its physical properties and how what it does when it's allowed to follow the pull of gravity. She didn't manipulate the paint's "fall," because she was interested giving up control and letting chance take over.
Who is this?
That is William Penn, Quaker and founding father of the state of Pennsylvania. This window was probably shown to the leaders of the Plymouth Church of the Pilgrims, in Brooklyn Heights, for approval to proceed with the extant, large window titled "William Penn, Peace Movement, Pennsylvania" that the Stained Glass Studio executed for the church. Penn is depicted in this window because, like Plymouth Church's first pastor, Henry Ward Beecher, he too was an early opponent of slavery. This gives the subject social meaning for the congregation.
Where is this?
You may have read this already on the label for that painting, but if you look very, very closely, you can just make out two smokestacks from New Jersey in the sunrise haze in the distance.
George Inness lived near the town of Montclair, New Jersey, and those smokestacks were part of a printing factory near the artist's home.
What is this?
It is a mask created by people in the Mau culture in northern Africa. It was used in a secret society known as "koma." Only those initiated into the special society were even allowed to see this mask! Many materials were added to this mask to imbue it with spiritual power. There is even an area near the mouth where a bundle of medicinal ingredients would be added to add spiritual power to the mask.
What is this?
This is a ceremonial house figure and it has so many different animals and figures depicted on it. Organic materials help imbue this object with a special presence. After being carved in the woods, the figure would be coated in mud and painted.
What is that?
That is actually a type of piano/harpsicord called a "Spinet."
Can you tell me more about the sugar industry and its history?
Most sugar production was done on cane plantations in the Caribbean and Brazil, and the plantations were worked on by slaves. That's the general, broad-sweeping overview of the history of the sugar industry. Wealthy Europeans and American land-owners profited off of the slave-labor and the increasing global demand for sugar.
There is another tea set in this room which shows a teapot from 1876 in this room with a Chinese man's head and a sugar bowl with a Black man's head on the lid. The connection between sugar production and slavery was inherent and clear.
Okay, thank you! That helps a lot and totally makes sense. I felt like I didn't really understand the ways in which the industry functioned and for how long etc. but I think it makes more sense now that it was slave labor that made it so exploitative.
Kara Walker's work is incredible at addressing the cruelty of slavery. I wish we had her silhouette works on view, but they're currently not up. There's a really powerful painting in the American Art galleries (also on the 5th floor) that shows a family riding on a horse escaping slave conditions in the south. The artist Eastman Johnson saw the scene first-hand and was so emotionally moved he created the painting. It's called "A Ride for Liberty."
Wow. How did the vase get this rich blue color?
That is made of a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling).  The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Hi, I'm writing a paper on Teti's coffin and I need some help. Could you tell me what some of the symbols mean?
There is so much to see on it--do you see those two big black dogs on the top? Those are representations of the god Anubis, Anubis was the guardian of mummies and he was responsible for escorting souls to the netherworld.
This looks like an eagle, what does it represent?
That is actually a falcon and falcons represent the god Horus. Horus symbolizes order over chaos.
Thanks! What is this eye for?
You will see that eye on many of the coffins--it's called a wedjat-eye or the eye of Horus. These eyes were painted on coffins because it was believed they would allow the deceased to see and participate in funerary rituals. They were painted so that when the person was buried they would always face east toward the rising sun.
Wow. What is this bird for?
That bird represents the goddess Nekhbet and she spreads her wings across the chest of the deceased to protect the mummy.
Is this Anubis too?
Anubis as the jackal on top of an image of a sarcophagus shows him protecting the body during its journey in the afterlife.
Are there any other coffins like this at Brooklyn that I could look at?
There is a whole mummy chamber in the back of the galleries and on your way there the Coffin of Nespanetjerenpere is a good one to check out.
Do we know who painted Teti's coffin and why it is painted so detailed?
Coffins were very important and they were all created with great care--there were many images and prayers you would want on your coffin to ensure you made it safely to the afterlife. In fact, Teti spent one year's salary on his coffin.
One year's salary? Wow.
Yes--that alone shows you how important it was! I can't think of anything I would spend one year's salary on.
Was anything buried with him?
I don't think we know exactly what Teti was buried with but Ancient Egyptians were usually buried with offerings for use by the deceased in the afterlife.
Can you please tell me more about Teti's coffin.
I can tell you that Teti was an artisan who painted tombs in the Valley of the Kings. He paid nearly a year's salary for this coffin, which is made of wood and has five different colors on it.
One particularly interesting fact is that over time, we see more and more people with elaborately decorated coffins. By the New Kingdom, middle ranks of society were able to afford coffins inscribed with parts of 'The Book of the Dead' inscribed on funerary objects. So here, Teti has on the side of his coffin one of the spells from the Book of the Dead. You'll also see four different figures on the side, let me know when you can see them. They're all to the left of the big Wedjat eye.
So let me tell you about them, you see the one all the way to the left, with the bird's head? That's the god Thoth, with the head of an Ibis bird, he's the god of hieroglyphs, writing, and generally wisdom. After him comes the human-headed god Kebehsenuef, who was one of Horus' sons. Then comes Anubis, the god of mummification. He's the one who would weigh the heart of the person traveling through the underworld. You'll see other jackals, who represent Anubis, at the top of the coffin as well. The last one all the way to the right, is Hapi, another son of Horus, who is associated with the Nile and fertility. All together they are depicted as reciting this spell from 'The Book of the Dead' in order to protect Teti's body.
I actually found the text that they are all saying in the hieroglyphs! Here is what Kebehsenuef is saying: 'I am your son, Osiris, I have come to be your protection I have united your bones for you, I have assembled your limbs for you I have brought you your heart, and placed it for you at its place in your body I have strengthened your house after you, as you live, eternally.' And next to Hapi is written: "I have come to be your protection I have bound your head and your limbs for you I have smitten you enemies beneath you for you, and given you your head, eternally.'
I can tell you that I got some of the information from our website, some from our publication 'To Live Forever' written by our curator Dr. Edward Bleiberg, and the translation of 'The Book of the Dead' from the University College of London website.
What is the waterfall supposed to represent?
This piece is called "Everlasting Waterfall" and was inspired by Steir's interest in both landscape as imagery and the liquid properties of paint. You may have already found the label, but it outlines how the artist applied a number of horizontal brushstrokes loaded with thinned paint along the top edge of the canvas, and the paint streamed down in lines, drips, and, rivulets, just like water would.
Her subject is partly the natural landscape. Her subject could also be paint itself: its physical properties and how what it does when it's allowed to follow the pull of gravity. She didn't manipulate the paint's "fall," because she was interested giving up control and letting chance take over.
Who is this?
That is William Penn, Quaker and founding father of the state of Pennsylvania. This window was probably shown to the leaders of the Plymouth Church of the Pilgrims, in Brooklyn Heights, for approval to proceed with the extant, large window titled "William Penn, Peace Movement, Pennsylvania" that the Stained Glass Studio executed for the church. Penn is depicted in this window because, like Plymouth Church's first pastor, Henry Ward Beecher, he too was an early opponent of slavery. This gives the subject social meaning for the congregation.
Where is this?
You may have read this already on the label for that painting, but if you look very, very closely, you can just make out two smokestacks from New Jersey in the sunrise haze in the distance.
George Inness lived near the town of Montclair, New Jersey, and those smokestacks were part of a printing factory near the artist's home.
What is this?
It is a mask created by people in the Mau culture in northern Africa. It was used in a secret society known as "koma." Only those initiated into the special society were even allowed to see this mask! Many materials were added to this mask to imbue it with spiritual power. There is even an area near the mouth where a bundle of medicinal ingredients would be added to add spiritual power to the mask.
What is this?
This is a ceremonial house figure and it has so many different animals and figures depicted on it. Organic materials help imbue this object with a special presence. After being carved in the woods, the figure would be coated in mud and painted.
What is that?
That is actually a type of piano/harpsicord called a "Spinet."
Can you tell me more about the sugar industry and its history?
Most sugar production was done on cane plantations in the Caribbean and Brazil, and the plantations were worked on by slaves. That's the general, broad-sweeping overview of the history of the sugar industry. Wealthy Europeans and American land-owners profited off of the slave-labor and the increasing global demand for sugar.
There is another tea set in this room which shows a teapot from 1876 in this room with a Chinese man's head and a sugar bowl with a Black man's head on the lid. The connection between sugar production and slavery was inherent and clear.
Okay, thank you! That helps a lot and totally makes sense. I felt like I didn't really understand the ways in which the industry functioned and for how long etc. but I think it makes more sense now that it was slave labor that made it so exploitative.
Kara Walker's work is incredible at addressing the cruelty of slavery. I wish we had her silhouette works on view, but they're currently not up. There's a really powerful painting in the American Art galleries (also on the 5th floor) that shows a family riding on a horse escaping slave conditions in the south. The artist Eastman Johnson saw the scene first-hand and was so emotionally moved he created the painting. It's called "A Ride for Liberty."
Wow. How did the vase get this rich blue color?
That is made of a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling).  The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Hi, I'm writing a paper on Teti's coffin and I need some help. Could you tell me what some of the symbols mean?
There is so much to see on it--do you see those two big black dogs on the top? Those are representations of the god Anubis, Anubis was the guardian of mummies and he was responsible for escorting souls to the netherworld.
This looks like an eagle, what does it represent?
That is actually a falcon and falcons represent the god Horus. Horus symbolizes order over chaos.
Thanks! What is this eye for?
You will see that eye on many of the coffins--it's called a wedjat-eye or the eye of Horus. These eyes were painted on coffins because it was believed they would allow the deceased to see and participate in funerary rituals. They were painted so that when the person was buried they would always face east toward the rising sun.
Wow. What is this bird for?
That bird represents the goddess Nekhbet and she spreads her wings across the chest of the deceased to protect the mummy.
Is this Anubis too?
Anubis as the jackal on top of an image of a sarcophagus shows him protecting the body during its journey in the afterlife.
Are there any other coffins like this at Brooklyn that I could look at?
There is a whole mummy chamber in the back of the galleries and on your way there the Coffin of Nespanetjerenpere is a good one to check out.
Do we know who painted Teti's coffin and why it is painted so detailed?
Coffins were very important and they were all created with great care--there were many images and prayers you would want on your coffin to ensure you made it safely to the afterlife. In fact, Teti spent one year's salary on his coffin.
One year's salary? Wow.
Yes--that alone shows you how important it was! I can't think of anything I would spend one year's salary on.
Was anything buried with him?
I don't think we know exactly what Teti was buried with but Ancient Egyptians were usually buried with offerings for use by the deceased in the afterlife.
Can you please tell me more about Teti's coffin.
I can tell you that Teti was an artisan who painted tombs in the Valley of the Kings. He paid nearly a year's salary for this coffin, which is made of wood and has five different colors on it.
One particularly interesting fact is that over time, we see more and more people with elaborately decorated coffins. By the New Kingdom, middle ranks of society were able to afford coffins inscribed with parts of 'The Book of the Dead' inscribed on funerary objects. So here, Teti has on the side of his coffin one of the spells from the Book of the Dead. You'll also see four different figures on the side, let me know when you can see them. They're all to the left of the big Wedjat eye.
So let me tell you about them, you see the one all the way to the left, with the bird's head? That's the god Thoth, with the head of an Ibis bird, he's the god of hieroglyphs, writing, and generally wisdom. After him comes the human-headed god Kebehsenuef, who was one of Horus' sons. Then comes Anubis, the god of mummification. He's the one who would weigh the heart of the person traveling through the underworld. You'll see other jackals, who represent Anubis, at the top of the coffin as well. The last one all the way to the right, is Hapi, another son of Horus, who is associated with the Nile and fertility. All together they are depicted as reciting this spell from 'The Book of the Dead' in order to protect Teti's body.
I actually found the text that they are all saying in the hieroglyphs! Here is what Kebehsenuef is saying: 'I am your son, Osiris, I have come to be your protection I have united your bones for you, I have assembled your limbs for you I have brought you your heart, and placed it for you at its place in your body I have strengthened your house after you, as you live, eternally.' And next to Hapi is written: "I have come to be your protection I have bound your head and your limbs for you I have smitten you enemies beneath you for you, and given you your head, eternally.'
I can tell you that I got some of the information from our website, some from our publication 'To Live Forever' written by our curator Dr. Edward Bleiberg, and the translation of 'The Book of the Dead' from the University College of London website.
What is the waterfall supposed to represent?
This piece is called "Everlasting Waterfall" and was inspired by Steir's interest in both landscape as imagery and the liquid properties of paint. You may have already found the label, but it outlines how the artist applied a number of horizontal brushstrokes loaded with thinned paint along the top edge of the canvas, and the paint streamed down in lines, drips, and, rivulets, just like water would.
Her subject is partly the natural landscape. Her subject could also be paint itself: its physical properties and how what it does when it's allowed to follow the pull of gravity. She didn't manipulate the paint's "fall," because she was interested giving up control and letting chance take over.
Who is this?
That is William Penn, Quaker and founding father of the state of Pennsylvania. This window was probably shown to the leaders of the Plymouth Church of the Pilgrims, in Brooklyn Heights, for approval to proceed with the extant, large window titled "William Penn, Peace Movement, Pennsylvania" that the Stained Glass Studio executed for the church. Penn is depicted in this window because, like Plymouth Church's first pastor, Henry Ward Beecher, he too was an early opponent of slavery. This gives the subject social meaning for the congregation.
Where is this?
You may have read this already on the label for that painting, but if you look very, very closely, you can just make out two smokestacks from New Jersey in the sunrise haze in the distance.
George Inness lived near the town of Montclair, New Jersey, and those smokestacks were part of a printing factory near the artist's home.
What is this?
It is a mask created by people in the Mau culture in northern Africa. It was used in a secret society known as "koma." Only those initiated into the special society were even allowed to see this mask! Many materials were added to this mask to imbue it with spiritual power. There is even an area near the mouth where a bundle of medicinal ingredients would be added to add spiritual power to the mask.
What is this?
This is a ceremonial house figure and it has so many different animals and figures depicted on it. Organic materials help imbue this object with a special presence. After being carved in the woods, the figure would be coated in mud and painted.
What is that?
That is actually a type of piano/harpsicord called a "Spinet."
Can you tell me more about the sugar industry and its history?
Most sugar production was done on cane plantations in the Caribbean and Brazil, and the plantations were worked on by slaves. That's the general, broad-sweeping overview of the history of the sugar industry. Wealthy Europeans and American land-owners profited off of the slave-labor and the increasing global demand for sugar.
There is another tea set in this room which shows a teapot from 1876 in this room with a Chinese man's head and a sugar bowl with a Black man's head on the lid. The connection between sugar production and slavery was inherent and clear.
Okay, thank you! That helps a lot and totally makes sense. I felt like I didn't really understand the ways in which the industry functioned and for how long etc. but I think it makes more sense now that it was slave labor that made it so exploitative.
Kara Walker's work is incredible at addressing the cruelty of slavery. I wish we had her silhouette works on view, but they're currently not up. There's a really powerful painting in the American Art galleries (also on the 5th floor) that shows a family riding on a horse escaping slave conditions in the south. The artist Eastman Johnson saw the scene first-hand and was so emotionally moved he created the painting. It's called "A Ride for Liberty."
Wow. How did the vase get this rich blue color?
That is made of a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling).  The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Hi, I'm writing a paper on Teti's coffin and I need some help. Could you tell me what some of the symbols mean?
There is so much to see on it--do you see those two big black dogs on the top? Those are representations of the god Anubis, Anubis was the guardian of mummies and he was responsible for escorting souls to the netherworld.
This looks like an eagle, what does it represent?
That is actually a falcon and falcons represent the god Horus. Horus symbolizes order over chaos.
Thanks! What is this eye for?
You will see that eye on many of the coffins--it's called a wedjat-eye or the eye of Horus. These eyes were painted on coffins because it was believed they would allow the deceased to see and participate in funerary rituals. They were painted so that when the person was buried they would always face east toward the rising sun.
Wow. What is this bird for?
That bird represents the goddess Nekhbet and she spreads her wings across the chest of the deceased to protect the mummy.
Is this Anubis too?
Anubis as the jackal on top of an image of a sarcophagus shows him protecting the body during its journey in the afterlife.
Are there any other coffins like this at Brooklyn that I could look at?
There is a whole mummy chamber in the back of the galleries and on your way there the Coffin of Nespanetjerenpere is a good one to check out.
Do we know who painted Teti's coffin and why it is painted so detailed?
Coffins were very important and they were all created with great care--there were many images and prayers you would want on your coffin to ensure you made it safely to the afterlife. In fact, Teti spent one year's salary on his coffin.
One year's salary? Wow.
Yes--that alone shows you how important it was! I can't think of anything I would spend one year's salary on.
Was anything buried with him?
I don't think we know exactly what Teti was buried with but Ancient Egyptians were usually buried with offerings for use by the deceased in the afterlife.
Can you please tell me more about Teti's coffin.
I can tell you that Teti was an artisan who painted tombs in the Valley of the Kings. He paid nearly a year's salary for this coffin, which is made of wood and has five different colors on it.
One particularly interesting fact is that over time, we see more and more people with elaborately decorated coffins. By the New Kingdom, middle ranks of society were able to afford coffins inscribed with parts of 'The Book of the Dead' inscribed on funerary objects. So here, Teti has on the side of his coffin one of the spells from the Book of the Dead. You'll also see four different figures on the side, let me know when you can see them. They're all to the left of the big Wedjat eye.
So let me tell you about them, you see the one all the way to the left, with the bird's head? That's the god Thoth, with the head of an Ibis bird, he's the god of hieroglyphs, writing, and generally wisdom. After him comes the human-headed god Kebehsenuef, who was one of Horus' sons. Then comes Anubis, the god of mummification. He's the one who would weigh the heart of the person traveling through the underworld. You'll see other jackals, who represent Anubis, at the top of the coffin as well. The last one all the way to the right, is Hapi, another son of Horus, who is associated with the Nile and fertility. All together they are depicted as reciting this spell from 'The Book of the Dead' in order to protect Teti's body.
I actually found the text that they are all saying in the hieroglyphs! Here is what Kebehsenuef is saying: 'I am your son, Osiris, I have come to be your protection I have united your bones for you, I have assembled your limbs for you I have brought you your heart, and placed it for you at its place in your body I have strengthened your house after you, as you live, eternally.' And next to Hapi is written: "I have come to be your protection I have bound your head and your limbs for you I have smitten you enemies beneath you for you, and given you your head, eternally.'
I can tell you that I got some of the information from our website, some from our publication 'To Live Forever' written by our curator Dr. Edward Bleiberg, and the translation of 'The Book of the Dead' from the University College of London website.
What is the waterfall supposed to represent?
This piece is called "Everlasting Waterfall" and was inspired by Steir's interest in both landscape as imagery and the liquid properties of paint. You may have already found the label, but it outlines how the artist applied a number of horizontal brushstrokes loaded with thinned paint along the top edge of the canvas, and the paint streamed down in lines, drips, and, rivulets, just like water would.
Her subject is partly the natural landscape. Her subject could also be paint itself: its physical properties and how what it does when it's allowed to follow the pull of gravity. She didn't manipulate the paint's "fall," because she was interested giving up control and letting chance take over.
Who is this?
That is William Penn, Quaker and founding father of the state of Pennsylvania. This window was probably shown to the leaders of the Plymouth Church of the Pilgrims, in Brooklyn Heights, for approval to proceed with the extant, large window titled "William Penn, Peace Movement, Pennsylvania" that the Stained Glass Studio executed for the church. Penn is depicted in this window because, like Plymouth Church's first pastor, Henry Ward Beecher, he too was an early opponent of slavery. This gives the subject social meaning for the congregation.
Where is this?
You may have read this already on the label for that painting, but if you look very, very closely, you can just make out two smokestacks from New Jersey in the sunrise haze in the distance.
George Inness lived near the town of Montclair, New Jersey, and those smokestacks were part of a printing factory near the artist's home.
What is this?
It is a mask created by people in the Mau culture in northern Africa. It was used in a secret society known as "koma." Only those initiated into the special society were even allowed to see this mask! Many materials were added to this mask to imbue it with spiritual power. There is even an area near the mouth where a bundle of medicinal ingredients would be added to add spiritual power to the mask.
What is this?
This is a ceremonial house figure and it has so many different animals and figures depicted on it. Organic materials help imbue this object with a special presence. After being carved in the woods, the figure would be coated in mud and painted.
What is that?
That is actually a type of piano/harpsicord called a "Spinet."
Can you tell me more about the sugar industry and its history?
Most sugar production was done on cane plantations in the Caribbean and Brazil, and the plantations were worked on by slaves. That's the general, broad-sweeping overview of the history of the sugar industry. Wealthy Europeans and American land-owners profited off of the slave-labor and the increasing global demand for sugar.
There is another tea set in this room which shows a teapot from 1876 in this room with a Chinese man's head and a sugar bowl with a Black man's head on the lid. The connection between sugar production and slavery was inherent and clear.
Okay, thank you! That helps a lot and totally makes sense. I felt like I didn't really understand the ways in which the industry functioned and for how long etc. but I think it makes more sense now that it was slave labor that made it so exploitative.
Kara Walker's work is incredible at addressing the cruelty of slavery. I wish we had her silhouette works on view, but they're currently not up. There's a really powerful painting in the American Art galleries (also on the 5th floor) that shows a family riding on a horse escaping slave conditions in the south. The artist Eastman Johnson saw the scene first-hand and was so emotionally moved he created the painting. It's called "A Ride for Liberty."
Wow. How did the vase get this rich blue color?
That is made of a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling).  The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Hi, I'm writing a paper on Teti's coffin and I need some help. Could you tell me what some of the symbols mean?
There is so much to see on it--do you see those two big black dogs on the top? Those are representations of the god Anubis, Anubis was the guardian of mummies and he was responsible for escorting souls to the netherworld.
This looks like an eagle, what does it represent?
That is actually a falcon and falcons represent the god Horus. Horus symbolizes order over chaos.
Thanks! What is this eye for?
You will see that eye on many of the coffins--it's called a wedjat-eye or the eye of Horus. These eyes were painted on coffins because it was believed they would allow the deceased to see and participate in funerary rituals. They were painted so that when the person was buried they would always face east toward the rising sun.
Wow. What is this bird for?
That bird represents the goddess Nekhbet and she spreads her wings across the chest of the deceased to protect the mummy.
Is this Anubis too?
Anubis as the jackal on top of an image of a sarcophagus shows him protecting the body during its journey in the afterlife.
Are there any other coffins like this at Brooklyn that I could look at?
There is a whole mummy chamber in the back of the galleries and on your way there the Coffin of Nespanetjerenpere is a good one to check out.
Do we know who painted Teti's coffin and why it is painted so detailed?
Coffins were very important and they were all created with great care--there were many images and prayers you would want on your coffin to ensure you made it safely to the afterlife. In fact, Teti spent one year's salary on his coffin.
One year's salary? Wow.
Yes--that alone shows you how important it was! I can't think of anything I would spend one year's salary on.
Was anything buried with him?
I don't think we know exactly what Teti was buried with but Ancient Egyptians were usually buried with offerings for use by the deceased in the afterlife.
Can you please tell me more about Teti's coffin.
I can tell you that Teti was an artisan who painted tombs in the Valley of the Kings. He paid nearly a year's salary for this coffin, which is made of wood and has five different colors on it.
One particularly interesting fact is that over time, we see more and more people with elaborately decorated coffins. By the New Kingdom, middle ranks of society were able to afford coffins inscribed with parts of 'The Book of the Dead' inscribed on funerary objects. So here, Teti has on the side of his coffin one of the spells from the Book of the Dead. You'll also see four different figures on the side, let me know when you can see them. They're all to the left of the big Wedjat eye.
So let me tell you about them, you see the one all the way to the left, with the bird's head? That's the god Thoth, with the head of an Ibis bird, he's the god of hieroglyphs, writing, and generally wisdom. After him comes the human-headed god Kebehsenuef, who was one of Horus' sons. Then comes Anubis, the god of mummification. He's the one who would weigh the heart of the person traveling through the underworld. You'll see other jackals, who represent Anubis, at the top of the coffin as well. The last one all the way to the right, is Hapi, another son of Horus, who is associated with the Nile and fertility. All together they are depicted as reciting this spell from 'The Book of the Dead' in order to protect Teti's body.
I actually found the text that they are all saying in the hieroglyphs! Here is what Kebehsenuef is saying: 'I am your son, Osiris, I have come to be your protection I have united your bones for you, I have assembled your limbs for you I have brought you your heart, and placed it for you at its place in your body I have strengthened your house after you, as you live, eternally.' And next to Hapi is written: "I have come to be your protection I have bound your head and your limbs for you I have smitten you enemies beneath you for you, and given you your head, eternally.'
I can tell you that I got some of the information from our website, some from our publication 'To Live Forever' written by our curator Dr. Edward Bleiberg, and the translation of 'The Book of the Dead' from the University College of London website.
What is the waterfall supposed to represent?
This piece is called "Everlasting Waterfall" and was inspired by Steir's interest in both landscape as imagery and the liquid properties of paint. You may have already found the label, but it outlines how the artist applied a number of horizontal brushstrokes loaded with thinned paint along the top edge of the canvas, and the paint streamed down in lines, drips, and, rivulets, just like water would.
Her subject is partly the natural landscape. Her subject could also be paint itself: its physical properties and how what it does when it's allowed to follow the pull of gravity. She didn't manipulate the paint's "fall," because she was interested giving up control and letting chance take over.
Who is this?
That is William Penn, Quaker and founding father of the state of Pennsylvania. This window was probably shown to the leaders of the Plymouth Church of the Pilgrims, in Brooklyn Heights, for approval to proceed with the extant, large window titled "William Penn, Peace Movement, Pennsylvania" that the Stained Glass Studio executed for the church. Penn is depicted in this window because, like Plymouth Church's first pastor, Henry Ward Beecher, he too was an early opponent of slavery. This gives the subject social meaning for the congregation.
Where is this?
You may have read this already on the label for that painting, but if you look very, very closely, you can just make out two smokestacks from New Jersey in the sunrise haze in the distance.
George Inness lived near the town of Montclair, New Jersey, and those smokestacks were part of a printing factory near the artist's home.
What is this?
It is a mask created by people in the Mau culture in northern Africa. It was used in a secret society known as "koma." Only those initiated into the special society were even allowed to see this mask! Many materials were added to this mask to imbue it with spiritual power. There is even an area near the mouth where a bundle of medicinal ingredients would be added to add spiritual power to the mask.
What is this?
This is a ceremonial house figure and it has so many different animals and figures depicted on it. Organic materials help imbue this object with a special presence. After being carved in the woods, the figure would be coated in mud and painted.
What is that?
That is actually a type of piano/harpsicord called a "Spinet."
Can you tell me more about the sugar industry and its history?
Most sugar production was done on cane plantations in the Caribbean and Brazil, and the plantations were worked on by slaves. That's the general, broad-sweeping overview of the history of the sugar industry. Wealthy Europeans and American land-owners profited off of the slave-labor and the increasing global demand for sugar.
There is another tea set in this room which shows a teapot from 1876 in this room with a Chinese man's head and a sugar bowl with a Black man's head on the lid. The connection between sugar production and slavery was inherent and clear.
Okay, thank you! That helps a lot and totally makes sense. I felt like I didn't really understand the ways in which the industry functioned and for how long etc. but I think it makes more sense now that it was slave labor that made it so exploitative.
Kara Walker's work is incredible at addressing the cruelty of slavery. I wish we had her silhouette works on view, but they're currently not up. There's a really powerful painting in the American Art galleries (also on the 5th floor) that shows a family riding on a horse escaping slave conditions in the south. The artist Eastman Johnson saw the scene first-hand and was so emotionally moved he created the painting. It's called "A Ride for Liberty."
Wow. How did the vase get this rich blue color?
That is made of a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling).  The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.