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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is this?
This work by Salvatore Albano depicts "The Fallen Angels" who, according to the Bible, were the angels who rebelled against God along with Lucifer, who became the Devil.
I see, thanks, now I can relate to this work.
You're welcome! Are you familiar with that Biblical story, is that what made it easier to relate to?
Yes, I am. Is that main one Lucifer?
Well it's possible the main figure, whom you sent the photo of, could be Lucifer himself, but that is just speculation. He does look very angry and determined though, I think.
Beautiful work, truly inspired.
I agree, I also love the contrast between the white marble of the sculpture and the dark stone of the base.
Yes! 
I love this serene, beautiful outdoor scene by Theodore Robinson! What drew you to this work?
The way it's painted and how gentle it is in the colors and the woman's expression. Also the fact that I don't know anything about the painter.
Theodore Robinson is considered one of the first American Impressionists, a movement that began in, and is largely associated with, France. William Merritt Chase and Childe Hassam, two artists whom we have on view on the 5th floor, are also considered American Impressionists.
The Impressionists were concerned with capturing fleeting moments resulting in often quickly painted works with visible, varying brushstrokes. There is another work by Robinson on that same wall as well as 2 works by Monet, a noted French Impressionist! Robinson even went to France to study with the French Impressionists and became close friends with Monet.
Loved the Monet paintings! Absolutely beautiful.
I agree, seeing Monet is always a treat! I especially love the reflection on the water in "The Doge's Palace," the colors are so vibrant.
Yes! One of my favorites! Was it always here? I feel like I've seen it somewhere else? Do you have any info on it?
Monet is famous for creating many versions of the "same" painting. Because the Impressionists were interested in light and capturing the effects, he would often sit at the same site for a long period of time, painting different canvases of the same thing at different times of the day to see the changing light effects. There is a painting at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in Manhattan that looks similar to this, yes! I do believe our version has also been on view for some time, so it's possible you've seen it here before as well.
I probably saw the one at The Met. I am from Brazil so this is my first time here.
Oh, well, welcome to Brooklyn! Yes, you may have seen the Met's version. Although, I think it is easy to confuse various paintings by Monet because the subject matter, colors, and style can be so similar.
That's true, thanks!
Of course!
Could you give me some information?
The subject of this painting is the sister-in-law of a friend of the artist, Henri Fantin-Latour. She was the wife of a businessman Leon Maitre. Fantin-Latour painted her three times. LaTour prefered painting quiet scenes of men and women he knew well. Like Madame Maitre, they often seem absorbed in their own interior world, a new development in society portraiture.
Surprisingly, considering how beautiful and mysterious this portrait is, the artist is best known for paintings of flowers and group portraits, not portraits of a single subject.
Is Mary supposed to be topless and this was censored?
I'm glad to see you're looking so closely at Maso di Banco's triptych. Mary is not meant to be topless, it appears as though her shirt is a sort of coral or salmon color, and the typical blue robe she is often seen wearing is draped around her. On occasion she is presented breast feeding (Madonna Lactans) the Christ Child which was seen as a sign of her compassion and does not seem to have caused offense.
This left-hand panel is separated into three 'scenes' in a vertical manner: the top scene shows the Annunciation, when the angel Gabriel came to tell Mary she would conceive Jesus. The middle scene shows the shepherds, who were told about the coming of Jesus by angels, and who visited Jesus, Mary and Joseph after Jesus' birth. And the bottom scene, that you sent a photo of, is a nativity scene. Jesus is in the manger, the Virgin Mary is relaxed next to the baby, and Joseph sits at the front, all three figures have halos above their heads. This way of showing a story in various scenes on top of each other is called a 'stacked composition' and was popular to help tell stories.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this?
This statue dates to a period when the Persian Empire controlled Egypt which explains the man's unusual clothing and jewelry. The high skirt tied at the chest is distinctly Persian as is the necklace, called a "torque," featuring ibexes. Despite the Persian garments, this man still wears an Egyptian-style wig and had Egyptian-style features.
I'd like to know what this is.
Simply put, this is a chair. The Ancient Egyptians invented chairs like this in the 2nd Dynasty and you can see similar seating depicted in some of the reliefs in the gallery. Animal feet--in this case lion--were popular on Ancient Egyptian chairs and the protrusions below the feet were designed to secure the chair in sockets.
Hi! That is the "Century Vase," made for the United States Centennial anniversary in 1876.
I bet you spotted the silhouette of George Washington already! If you keep looking, you will see many scenes from American history and images of American innovations including the sewing machine and telegraph poles! This work was meant to be publicly displayed and to act as a sort of advertisement for America's past, present, and future at that 100-year mark.
It was shown in Philadelphia in 1876, in a big exhibition that was open to the public to mark the Centennial. It had buildings and booths dedicated to various industries and trades, to art, etc. It was the first World's Fair held in the United States!
That's awesome! Super cool!
I agree! It was a major attraction. It took 10 years to plan, and it was held in the area that is present-day Fairmount Park.
How did the Brooklyn museum acquire it?
It was a gift from the descendants of the man who founded Union Porcelain Works, the Brooklyn-based company that made it.
In the erotic art from Ptolemaic Egypt, why are the proportions of the genitals so unrealistic?
Keeping in mind that such pieces were made to be deposited in tombs scholars think that the oversized genitals may represent the person's wish to be sexually potent in the afterlife. Also, this is strong symbolism for fertility, of course! Much of ancient Egyptian myth revolves around birth, death, and resurrection, the central story involves the god Osiris, who impregnated his wife, Isis, after he was dead, thus creating an heir, after the fact. And I can guess that the idea of fertility on all levels must have been so central to their culture, the crops, the livestock, the continuity of the royal line.
Just the other day, I saw some graffiti of a giant phallus (shall we say) in a subway station. Some things are universal!
I know in Pompeii they were placed everywhere as a symbol of good luck. (Not to lead you to a brothel, which is a common misconception). The idea is that a phallus makes you laugh, which wards off bad luck!
I like that idea, I guess. I might not put it into practice in my own home, though!
Is this sculpture broken or was this how the artist wanted the hand at the top to look? What does the hand mean?
It's meant to be that way! Rodin deliberately made many of his works to look rough and unfinished. He believed it gave his works a greater emotional impact as if you could feel the sculpture emerging from the raw material. It also differentiated his sculpture from the highly finished academic work of his contemporaries. “The artist must create a spark before he can make a fire and before art is born, the artist must ready to be consumed by the fire of his own creation,” Rodin said. As for the hand, this is part of the story of Orpheus. Orpheus was an amazingly gifted musician and singer. You might see that he's holding his lyre, a stringed instrument.
When his wife Eurydice died, he went down to the underworld and convinced the gods of the underworld by playing and singing for them to release her and send her back to the living world. But he had to promise not to look back as he and Eurydice went back up to the land of the living. He forgot, and looked back to check on Eurydice, thus losing her to the underworld again, permanently. That hand is all we see of Eurydice here.
What was Picasso thinking with this one?
That's a good question. You may already know, that Picasso was a pioneer of Cubism, a movement that was focused on distortion of perspective and reorganizing space and the components of the human figure.
The colors in this particular painting are influenced by the bleakness of World War II Europe. If you look carefully at the face, you can pick out all the normal features, 2 eyes, nose, mouth, and ear, but their arrangement is distorted to present multiple viewpoints at once. Picasso was interested in showing more than what you can get from a photograph or traditional 2-dimensional image.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is this?
This work by Salvatore Albano depicts "The Fallen Angels" who, according to the Bible, were the angels who rebelled against God along with Lucifer, who became the Devil.
I see, thanks, now I can relate to this work.
You're welcome! Are you familiar with that Biblical story, is that what made it easier to relate to?
Yes, I am. Is that main one Lucifer?
Well it's possible the main figure, whom you sent the photo of, could be Lucifer himself, but that is just speculation. He does look very angry and determined though, I think.
Beautiful work, truly inspired.
I agree, I also love the contrast between the white marble of the sculpture and the dark stone of the base.
Yes! 
I love this serene, beautiful outdoor scene by Theodore Robinson! What drew you to this work?
The way it's painted and how gentle it is in the colors and the woman's expression. Also the fact that I don't know anything about the painter.
Theodore Robinson is considered one of the first American Impressionists, a movement that began in, and is largely associated with, France. William Merritt Chase and Childe Hassam, two artists whom we have on view on the 5th floor, are also considered American Impressionists.
The Impressionists were concerned with capturing fleeting moments resulting in often quickly painted works with visible, varying brushstrokes. There is another work by Robinson on that same wall as well as 2 works by Monet, a noted French Impressionist! Robinson even went to France to study with the French Impressionists and became close friends with Monet.
Loved the Monet paintings! Absolutely beautiful.
I agree, seeing Monet is always a treat! I especially love the reflection on the water in "The Doge's Palace," the colors are so vibrant.
Yes! One of my favorites! Was it always here? I feel like I've seen it somewhere else? Do you have any info on it?
Monet is famous for creating many versions of the "same" painting. Because the Impressionists were interested in light and capturing the effects, he would often sit at the same site for a long period of time, painting different canvases of the same thing at different times of the day to see the changing light effects. There is a painting at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in Manhattan that looks similar to this, yes! I do believe our version has also been on view for some time, so it's possible you've seen it here before as well.
I probably saw the one at The Met. I am from Brazil so this is my first time here.
Oh, well, welcome to Brooklyn! Yes, you may have seen the Met's version. Although, I think it is easy to confuse various paintings by Monet because the subject matter, colors, and style can be so similar.
That's true, thanks!
Of course!
Could you give me some information?
The subject of this painting is the sister-in-law of a friend of the artist, Henri Fantin-Latour. She was the wife of a businessman Leon Maitre. Fantin-Latour painted her three times. LaTour prefered painting quiet scenes of men and women he knew well. Like Madame Maitre, they often seem absorbed in their own interior world, a new development in society portraiture.
Surprisingly, considering how beautiful and mysterious this portrait is, the artist is best known for paintings of flowers and group portraits, not portraits of a single subject.
Is Mary supposed to be topless and this was censored?
I'm glad to see you're looking so closely at Maso di Banco's triptych. Mary is not meant to be topless, it appears as though her shirt is a sort of coral or salmon color, and the typical blue robe she is often seen wearing is draped around her. On occasion she is presented breast feeding (Madonna Lactans) the Christ Child which was seen as a sign of her compassion and does not seem to have caused offense.
This left-hand panel is separated into three 'scenes' in a vertical manner: the top scene shows the Annunciation, when the angel Gabriel came to tell Mary she would conceive Jesus. The middle scene shows the shepherds, who were told about the coming of Jesus by angels, and who visited Jesus, Mary and Joseph after Jesus' birth. And the bottom scene, that you sent a photo of, is a nativity scene. Jesus is in the manger, the Virgin Mary is relaxed next to the baby, and Joseph sits at the front, all three figures have halos above their heads. This way of showing a story in various scenes on top of each other is called a 'stacked composition' and was popular to help tell stories.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this?
This statue dates to a period when the Persian Empire controlled Egypt which explains the man's unusual clothing and jewelry. The high skirt tied at the chest is distinctly Persian as is the necklace, called a "torque," featuring ibexes. Despite the Persian garments, this man still wears an Egyptian-style wig and had Egyptian-style features.
I'd like to know what this is.
Simply put, this is a chair. The Ancient Egyptians invented chairs like this in the 2nd Dynasty and you can see similar seating depicted in some of the reliefs in the gallery. Animal feet--in this case lion--were popular on Ancient Egyptian chairs and the protrusions below the feet were designed to secure the chair in sockets.
Hi! That is the "Century Vase," made for the United States Centennial anniversary in 1876.
I bet you spotted the silhouette of George Washington already! If you keep looking, you will see many scenes from American history and images of American innovations including the sewing machine and telegraph poles! This work was meant to be publicly displayed and to act as a sort of advertisement for America's past, present, and future at that 100-year mark.
It was shown in Philadelphia in 1876, in a big exhibition that was open to the public to mark the Centennial. It had buildings and booths dedicated to various industries and trades, to art, etc. It was the first World's Fair held in the United States!
That's awesome! Super cool!
I agree! It was a major attraction. It took 10 years to plan, and it was held in the area that is present-day Fairmount Park.
How did the Brooklyn museum acquire it?
It was a gift from the descendants of the man who founded Union Porcelain Works, the Brooklyn-based company that made it.
In the erotic art from Ptolemaic Egypt, why are the proportions of the genitals so unrealistic?
Keeping in mind that such pieces were made to be deposited in tombs scholars think that the oversized genitals may represent the person's wish to be sexually potent in the afterlife. Also, this is strong symbolism for fertility, of course! Much of ancient Egyptian myth revolves around birth, death, and resurrection, the central story involves the god Osiris, who impregnated his wife, Isis, after he was dead, thus creating an heir, after the fact. And I can guess that the idea of fertility on all levels must have been so central to their culture, the crops, the livestock, the continuity of the royal line.
Just the other day, I saw some graffiti of a giant phallus (shall we say) in a subway station. Some things are universal!
I know in Pompeii they were placed everywhere as a symbol of good luck. (Not to lead you to a brothel, which is a common misconception). The idea is that a phallus makes you laugh, which wards off bad luck!
I like that idea, I guess. I might not put it into practice in my own home, though!
Is this sculpture broken or was this how the artist wanted the hand at the top to look? What does the hand mean?
It's meant to be that way! Rodin deliberately made many of his works to look rough and unfinished. He believed it gave his works a greater emotional impact as if you could feel the sculpture emerging from the raw material. It also differentiated his sculpture from the highly finished academic work of his contemporaries. “The artist must create a spark before he can make a fire and before art is born, the artist must ready to be consumed by the fire of his own creation,” Rodin said. As for the hand, this is part of the story of Orpheus. Orpheus was an amazingly gifted musician and singer. You might see that he's holding his lyre, a stringed instrument.
When his wife Eurydice died, he went down to the underworld and convinced the gods of the underworld by playing and singing for them to release her and send her back to the living world. But he had to promise not to look back as he and Eurydice went back up to the land of the living. He forgot, and looked back to check on Eurydice, thus losing her to the underworld again, permanently. That hand is all we see of Eurydice here.
What was Picasso thinking with this one?
That's a good question. You may already know, that Picasso was a pioneer of Cubism, a movement that was focused on distortion of perspective and reorganizing space and the components of the human figure.
The colors in this particular painting are influenced by the bleakness of World War II Europe. If you look carefully at the face, you can pick out all the normal features, 2 eyes, nose, mouth, and ear, but their arrangement is distorted to present multiple viewpoints at once. Picasso was interested in showing more than what you can get from a photograph or traditional 2-dimensional image.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is this?
This work by Salvatore Albano depicts "The Fallen Angels" who, according to the Bible, were the angels who rebelled against God along with Lucifer, who became the Devil.
I see, thanks, now I can relate to this work.
You're welcome! Are you familiar with that Biblical story, is that what made it easier to relate to?
Yes, I am. Is that main one Lucifer?
Well it's possible the main figure, whom you sent the photo of, could be Lucifer himself, but that is just speculation. He does look very angry and determined though, I think.
Beautiful work, truly inspired.
I agree, I also love the contrast between the white marble of the sculpture and the dark stone of the base.
Yes! 
I love this serene, beautiful outdoor scene by Theodore Robinson! What drew you to this work?
The way it's painted and how gentle it is in the colors and the woman's expression. Also the fact that I don't know anything about the painter.
Theodore Robinson is considered one of the first American Impressionists, a movement that began in, and is largely associated with, France. William Merritt Chase and Childe Hassam, two artists whom we have on view on the 5th floor, are also considered American Impressionists.
The Impressionists were concerned with capturing fleeting moments resulting in often quickly painted works with visible, varying brushstrokes. There is another work by Robinson on that same wall as well as 2 works by Monet, a noted French Impressionist! Robinson even went to France to study with the French Impressionists and became close friends with Monet.
Loved the Monet paintings! Absolutely beautiful.
I agree, seeing Monet is always a treat! I especially love the reflection on the water in "The Doge's Palace," the colors are so vibrant.
Yes! One of my favorites! Was it always here? I feel like I've seen it somewhere else? Do you have any info on it?
Monet is famous for creating many versions of the "same" painting. Because the Impressionists were interested in light and capturing the effects, he would often sit at the same site for a long period of time, painting different canvases of the same thing at different times of the day to see the changing light effects. There is a painting at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in Manhattan that looks similar to this, yes! I do believe our version has also been on view for some time, so it's possible you've seen it here before as well.
I probably saw the one at The Met. I am from Brazil so this is my first time here.
Oh, well, welcome to Brooklyn! Yes, you may have seen the Met's version. Although, I think it is easy to confuse various paintings by Monet because the subject matter, colors, and style can be so similar.
That's true, thanks!
Of course!
Could you give me some information?
The subject of this painting is the sister-in-law of a friend of the artist, Henri Fantin-Latour. She was the wife of a businessman Leon Maitre. Fantin-Latour painted her three times. LaTour prefered painting quiet scenes of men and women he knew well. Like Madame Maitre, they often seem absorbed in their own interior world, a new development in society portraiture.
Surprisingly, considering how beautiful and mysterious this portrait is, the artist is best known for paintings of flowers and group portraits, not portraits of a single subject.
Is Mary supposed to be topless and this was censored?
I'm glad to see you're looking so closely at Maso di Banco's triptych. Mary is not meant to be topless, it appears as though her shirt is a sort of coral or salmon color, and the typical blue robe she is often seen wearing is draped around her. On occasion she is presented breast feeding (Madonna Lactans) the Christ Child which was seen as a sign of her compassion and does not seem to have caused offense.
This left-hand panel is separated into three 'scenes' in a vertical manner: the top scene shows the Annunciation, when the angel Gabriel came to tell Mary she would conceive Jesus. The middle scene shows the shepherds, who were told about the coming of Jesus by angels, and who visited Jesus, Mary and Joseph after Jesus' birth. And the bottom scene, that you sent a photo of, is a nativity scene. Jesus is in the manger, the Virgin Mary is relaxed next to the baby, and Joseph sits at the front, all three figures have halos above their heads. This way of showing a story in various scenes on top of each other is called a 'stacked composition' and was popular to help tell stories.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this?
This statue dates to a period when the Persian Empire controlled Egypt which explains the man's unusual clothing and jewelry. The high skirt tied at the chest is distinctly Persian as is the necklace, called a "torque," featuring ibexes. Despite the Persian garments, this man still wears an Egyptian-style wig and had Egyptian-style features.
I'd like to know what this is.
Simply put, this is a chair. The Ancient Egyptians invented chairs like this in the 2nd Dynasty and you can see similar seating depicted in some of the reliefs in the gallery. Animal feet--in this case lion--were popular on Ancient Egyptian chairs and the protrusions below the feet were designed to secure the chair in sockets.
Hi! That is the "Century Vase," made for the United States Centennial anniversary in 1876.
I bet you spotted the silhouette of George Washington already! If you keep looking, you will see many scenes from American history and images of American innovations including the sewing machine and telegraph poles! This work was meant to be publicly displayed and to act as a sort of advertisement for America's past, present, and future at that 100-year mark.
It was shown in Philadelphia in 1876, in a big exhibition that was open to the public to mark the Centennial. It had buildings and booths dedicated to various industries and trades, to art, etc. It was the first World's Fair held in the United States!
That's awesome! Super cool!
I agree! It was a major attraction. It took 10 years to plan, and it was held in the area that is present-day Fairmount Park.
How did the Brooklyn museum acquire it?
It was a gift from the descendants of the man who founded Union Porcelain Works, the Brooklyn-based company that made it.
In the erotic art from Ptolemaic Egypt, why are the proportions of the genitals so unrealistic?
Keeping in mind that such pieces were made to be deposited in tombs scholars think that the oversized genitals may represent the person's wish to be sexually potent in the afterlife. Also, this is strong symbolism for fertility, of course! Much of ancient Egyptian myth revolves around birth, death, and resurrection, the central story involves the god Osiris, who impregnated his wife, Isis, after he was dead, thus creating an heir, after the fact. And I can guess that the idea of fertility on all levels must have been so central to their culture, the crops, the livestock, the continuity of the royal line.
Just the other day, I saw some graffiti of a giant phallus (shall we say) in a subway station. Some things are universal!
I know in Pompeii they were placed everywhere as a symbol of good luck. (Not to lead you to a brothel, which is a common misconception). The idea is that a phallus makes you laugh, which wards off bad luck!
I like that idea, I guess. I might not put it into practice in my own home, though!
Is this sculpture broken or was this how the artist wanted the hand at the top to look? What does the hand mean?
It's meant to be that way! Rodin deliberately made many of his works to look rough and unfinished. He believed it gave his works a greater emotional impact as if you could feel the sculpture emerging from the raw material. It also differentiated his sculpture from the highly finished academic work of his contemporaries. “The artist must create a spark before he can make a fire and before art is born, the artist must ready to be consumed by the fire of his own creation,” Rodin said. As for the hand, this is part of the story of Orpheus. Orpheus was an amazingly gifted musician and singer. You might see that he's holding his lyre, a stringed instrument.
When his wife Eurydice died, he went down to the underworld and convinced the gods of the underworld by playing and singing for them to release her and send her back to the living world. But he had to promise not to look back as he and Eurydice went back up to the land of the living. He forgot, and looked back to check on Eurydice, thus losing her to the underworld again, permanently. That hand is all we see of Eurydice here.
What was Picasso thinking with this one?
That's a good question. You may already know, that Picasso was a pioneer of Cubism, a movement that was focused on distortion of perspective and reorganizing space and the components of the human figure.
The colors in this particular painting are influenced by the bleakness of World War II Europe. If you look carefully at the face, you can pick out all the normal features, 2 eyes, nose, mouth, and ear, but their arrangement is distorted to present multiple viewpoints at once. Picasso was interested in showing more than what you can get from a photograph or traditional 2-dimensional image.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until fall 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is this?
This work by Salvatore Albano depicts "The Fallen Angels" who, according to the Bible, were the angels who rebelled against God along with Lucifer, who became the Devil.
I see, thanks, now I can relate to this work.
You're welcome! Are you familiar with that Biblical story, is that what made it easier to relate to?
Yes, I am. Is that main one Lucifer?
Well it's possible the main figure, whom you sent the photo of, could be Lucifer himself, but that is just speculation. He does look very angry and determined though, I think.
Beautiful work, truly inspired.
I agree, I also love the contrast between the white marble of the sculpture and the dark stone of the base.
Yes! 
I love this serene, beautiful outdoor scene by Theodore Robinson! What drew you to this work?
The way it's painted and how gentle it is in the colors and the woman's expression. Also the fact that I don't know anything about the painter.
Theodore Robinson is considered one of the first American Impressionists, a movement that began in, and is largely associated with, France. William Merritt Chase and Childe Hassam, two artists whom we have on view on the 5th floor, are also considered American Impressionists.
The Impressionists were concerned with capturing fleeting moments resulting in often quickly painted works with visible, varying brushstrokes. There is another work by Robinson on that same wall as well as 2 works by Monet, a noted French Impressionist! Robinson even went to France to study with the French Impressionists and became close friends with Monet.
Loved the Monet paintings! Absolutely beautiful.
I agree, seeing Monet is always a treat! I especially love the reflection on the water in "The Doge's Palace," the colors are so vibrant.
Yes! One of my favorites! Was it always here? I feel like I've seen it somewhere else? Do you have any info on it?
Monet is famous for creating many versions of the "same" painting. Because the Impressionists were interested in light and capturing the effects, he would often sit at the same site for a long period of time, painting different canvases of the same thing at different times of the day to see the changing light effects. There is a painting at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in Manhattan that looks similar to this, yes! I do believe our version has also been on view for some time, so it's possible you've seen it here before as well.
I probably saw the one at The Met. I am from Brazil so this is my first time here.
Oh, well, welcome to Brooklyn! Yes, you may have seen the Met's version. Although, I think it is easy to confuse various paintings by Monet because the subject matter, colors, and style can be so similar.
That's true, thanks!
Of course!
Could you give me some information?
The subject of this painting is the sister-in-law of a friend of the artist, Henri Fantin-Latour. She was the wife of a businessman Leon Maitre. Fantin-Latour painted her three times. LaTour prefered painting quiet scenes of men and women he knew well. Like Madame Maitre, they often seem absorbed in their own interior world, a new development in society portraiture.
Surprisingly, considering how beautiful and mysterious this portrait is, the artist is best known for paintings of flowers and group portraits, not portraits of a single subject.
Is Mary supposed to be topless and this was censored?
I'm glad to see you're looking so closely at Maso di Banco's triptych. Mary is not meant to be topless, it appears as though her shirt is a sort of coral or salmon color, and the typical blue robe she is often seen wearing is draped around her. On occasion she is presented breast feeding (Madonna Lactans) the Christ Child which was seen as a sign of her compassion and does not seem to have caused offense.
This left-hand panel is separated into three 'scenes' in a vertical manner: the top scene shows the Annunciation, when the angel Gabriel came to tell Mary she would conceive Jesus. The middle scene shows the shepherds, who were told about the coming of Jesus by angels, and who visited Jesus, Mary and Joseph after Jesus' birth. And the bottom scene, that you sent a photo of, is a nativity scene. Jesus is in the manger, the Virgin Mary is relaxed next to the baby, and Joseph sits at the front, all three figures have halos above their heads. This way of showing a story in various scenes on top of each other is called a 'stacked composition' and was popular to help tell stories.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this?
This statue dates to a period when the Persian Empire controlled Egypt which explains the man's unusual clothing and jewelry. The high skirt tied at the chest is distinctly Persian as is the necklace, called a "torque," featuring ibexes. Despite the Persian garments, this man still wears an Egyptian-style wig and had Egyptian-style features.
I'd like to know what this is.
Simply put, this is a chair. The Ancient Egyptians invented chairs like this in the 2nd Dynasty and you can see similar seating depicted in some of the reliefs in the gallery. Animal feet--in this case lion--were popular on Ancient Egyptian chairs and the protrusions below the feet were designed to secure the chair in sockets.
Hi! That is the "Century Vase," made for the United States Centennial anniversary in 1876.
I bet you spotted the silhouette of George Washington already! If you keep looking, you will see many scenes from American history and images of American innovations including the sewing machine and telegraph poles! This work was meant to be publicly displayed and to act as a sort of advertisement for America's past, present, and future at that 100-year mark.
It was shown in Philadelphia in 1876, in a big exhibition that was open to the public to mark the Centennial. It had buildings and booths dedicated to various industries and trades, to art, etc. It was the first World's Fair held in the United States!
That's awesome! Super cool!
I agree! It was a major attraction. It took 10 years to plan, and it was held in the area that is present-day Fairmount Park.
How did the Brooklyn museum acquire it?
It was a gift from the descendants of the man who founded Union Porcelain Works, the Brooklyn-based company that made it.
In the erotic art from Ptolemaic Egypt, why are the proportions of the genitals so unrealistic?
Keeping in mind that such pieces were made to be deposited in tombs scholars think that the oversized genitals may represent the person's wish to be sexually potent in the afterlife. Also, this is strong symbolism for fertility, of course! Much of ancient Egyptian myth revolves around birth, death, and resurrection, the central story involves the god Osiris, who impregnated his wife, Isis, after he was dead, thus creating an heir, after the fact. And I can guess that the idea of fertility on all levels must have been so central to their culture, the crops, the livestock, the continuity of the royal line.
Just the other day, I saw some graffiti of a giant phallus (shall we say) in a subway station. Some things are universal!
I know in Pompeii they were placed everywhere as a symbol of good luck. (Not to lead you to a brothel, which is a common misconception). The idea is that a phallus makes you laugh, which wards off bad luck!
I like that idea, I guess. I might not put it into practice in my own home, though!
Is this sculpture broken or was this how the artist wanted the hand at the top to look? What does the hand mean?
It's meant to be that way! Rodin deliberately made many of his works to look rough and unfinished. He believed it gave his works a greater emotional impact as if you could feel the sculpture emerging from the raw material. It also differentiated his sculpture from the highly finished academic work of his contemporaries. “The artist must create a spark before he can make a fire and before art is born, the artist must ready to be consumed by the fire of his own creation,” Rodin said. As for the hand, this is part of the story of Orpheus. Orpheus was an amazingly gifted musician and singer. You might see that he's holding his lyre, a stringed instrument.
When his wife Eurydice died, he went down to the underworld and convinced the gods of the underworld by playing and singing for them to release her and send her back to the living world. But he had to promise not to look back as he and Eurydice went back up to the land of the living. He forgot, and looked back to check on Eurydice, thus losing her to the underworld again, permanently. That hand is all we see of Eurydice here.
What was Picasso thinking with this one?
That's a good question. You may already know, that Picasso was a pioneer of Cubism, a movement that was focused on distortion of perspective and reorganizing space and the components of the human figure.
The colors in this particular painting are influenced by the bleakness of World War II Europe. If you look carefully at the face, you can pick out all the normal features, 2 eyes, nose, mouth, and ear, but their arrangement is distorted to present multiple viewpoints at once. Picasso was interested in showing more than what you can get from a photograph or traditional 2-dimensional image.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is this?
This work by Salvatore Albano depicts "The Fallen Angels" who, according to the Bible, were the angels who rebelled against God along with Lucifer, who became the Devil.
I see, thanks, now I can relate to this work.
You're welcome! Are you familiar with that Biblical story, is that what made it easier to relate to?
Yes, I am. Is that main one Lucifer?
Well it's possible the main figure, whom you sent the photo of, could be Lucifer himself, but that is just speculation. He does look very angry and determined though, I think.
Beautiful work, truly inspired.
I agree, I also love the contrast between the white marble of the sculpture and the dark stone of the base.
Yes! 
I love this serene, beautiful outdoor scene by Theodore Robinson! What drew you to this work?
The way it's painted and how gentle it is in the colors and the woman's expression. Also the fact that I don't know anything about the painter.
Theodore Robinson is considered one of the first American Impressionists, a movement that began in, and is largely associated with, France. William Merritt Chase and Childe Hassam, two artists whom we have on view on the 5th floor, are also considered American Impressionists.
The Impressionists were concerned with capturing fleeting moments resulting in often quickly painted works with visible, varying brushstrokes. There is another work by Robinson on that same wall as well as 2 works by Monet, a noted French Impressionist! Robinson even went to France to study with the French Impressionists and became close friends with Monet.
Loved the Monet paintings! Absolutely beautiful.
I agree, seeing Monet is always a treat! I especially love the reflection on the water in "The Doge's Palace," the colors are so vibrant.
Yes! One of my favorites! Was it always here? I feel like I've seen it somewhere else? Do you have any info on it?
Monet is famous for creating many versions of the "same" painting. Because the Impressionists were interested in light and capturing the effects, he would often sit at the same site for a long period of time, painting different canvases of the same thing at different times of the day to see the changing light effects. There is a painting at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in Manhattan that looks similar to this, yes! I do believe our version has also been on view for some time, so it's possible you've seen it here before as well.
I probably saw the one at The Met. I am from Brazil so this is my first time here.
Oh, well, welcome to Brooklyn! Yes, you may have seen the Met's version. Although, I think it is easy to confuse various paintings by Monet because the subject matter, colors, and style can be so similar.
That's true, thanks!
Of course!
Could you give me some information?
The subject of this painting is the sister-in-law of a friend of the artist, Henri Fantin-Latour. She was the wife of a businessman Leon Maitre. Fantin-Latour painted her three times. LaTour prefered painting quiet scenes of men and women he knew well. Like Madame Maitre, they often seem absorbed in their own interior world, a new development in society portraiture.
Surprisingly, considering how beautiful and mysterious this portrait is, the artist is best known for paintings of flowers and group portraits, not portraits of a single subject.
Is Mary supposed to be topless and this was censored?
I'm glad to see you're looking so closely at Maso di Banco's triptych. Mary is not meant to be topless, it appears as though her shirt is a sort of coral or salmon color, and the typical blue robe she is often seen wearing is draped around her. On occasion she is presented breast feeding (Madonna Lactans) the Christ Child which was seen as a sign of her compassion and does not seem to have caused offense.
This left-hand panel is separated into three 'scenes' in a vertical manner: the top scene shows the Annunciation, when the angel Gabriel came to tell Mary she would conceive Jesus. The middle scene shows the shepherds, who were told about the coming of Jesus by angels, and who visited Jesus, Mary and Joseph after Jesus' birth. And the bottom scene, that you sent a photo of, is a nativity scene. Jesus is in the manger, the Virgin Mary is relaxed next to the baby, and Joseph sits at the front, all three figures have halos above their heads. This way of showing a story in various scenes on top of each other is called a 'stacked composition' and was popular to help tell stories.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this?
This statue dates to a period when the Persian Empire controlled Egypt which explains the man's unusual clothing and jewelry. The high skirt tied at the chest is distinctly Persian as is the necklace, called a "torque," featuring ibexes. Despite the Persian garments, this man still wears an Egyptian-style wig and had Egyptian-style features.
I'd like to know what this is.
Simply put, this is a chair. The Ancient Egyptians invented chairs like this in the 2nd Dynasty and you can see similar seating depicted in some of the reliefs in the gallery. Animal feet--in this case lion--were popular on Ancient Egyptian chairs and the protrusions below the feet were designed to secure the chair in sockets.
Hi! That is the "Century Vase," made for the United States Centennial anniversary in 1876.
I bet you spotted the silhouette of George Washington already! If you keep looking, you will see many scenes from American history and images of American innovations including the sewing machine and telegraph poles! This work was meant to be publicly displayed and to act as a sort of advertisement for America's past, present, and future at that 100-year mark.
It was shown in Philadelphia in 1876, in a big exhibition that was open to the public to mark the Centennial. It had buildings and booths dedicated to various industries and trades, to art, etc. It was the first World's Fair held in the United States!
That's awesome! Super cool!
I agree! It was a major attraction. It took 10 years to plan, and it was held in the area that is present-day Fairmount Park.
How did the Brooklyn museum acquire it?
It was a gift from the descendants of the man who founded Union Porcelain Works, the Brooklyn-based company that made it.
In the erotic art from Ptolemaic Egypt, why are the proportions of the genitals so unrealistic?
Keeping in mind that such pieces were made to be deposited in tombs scholars think that the oversized genitals may represent the person's wish to be sexually potent in the afterlife. Also, this is strong symbolism for fertility, of course! Much of ancient Egyptian myth revolves around birth, death, and resurrection, the central story involves the god Osiris, who impregnated his wife, Isis, after he was dead, thus creating an heir, after the fact. And I can guess that the idea of fertility on all levels must have been so central to their culture, the crops, the livestock, the continuity of the royal line.
Just the other day, I saw some graffiti of a giant phallus (shall we say) in a subway station. Some things are universal!
I know in Pompeii they were placed everywhere as a symbol of good luck. (Not to lead you to a brothel, which is a common misconception). The idea is that a phallus makes you laugh, which wards off bad luck!
I like that idea, I guess. I might not put it into practice in my own home, though!
Is this sculpture broken or was this how the artist wanted the hand at the top to look? What does the hand mean?
It's meant to be that way! Rodin deliberately made many of his works to look rough and unfinished. He believed it gave his works a greater emotional impact as if you could feel the sculpture emerging from the raw material. It also differentiated his sculpture from the highly finished academic work of his contemporaries. “The artist must create a spark before he can make a fire and before art is born, the artist must ready to be consumed by the fire of his own creation,” Rodin said. As for the hand, this is part of the story of Orpheus. Orpheus was an amazingly gifted musician and singer. You might see that he's holding his lyre, a stringed instrument.
When his wife Eurydice died, he went down to the underworld and convinced the gods of the underworld by playing and singing for them to release her and send her back to the living world. But he had to promise not to look back as he and Eurydice went back up to the land of the living. He forgot, and looked back to check on Eurydice, thus losing her to the underworld again, permanently. That hand is all we see of Eurydice here.
What was Picasso thinking with this one?
That's a good question. You may already know, that Picasso was a pioneer of Cubism, a movement that was focused on distortion of perspective and reorganizing space and the components of the human figure.
The colors in this particular painting are influenced by the bleakness of World War II Europe. If you look carefully at the face, you can pick out all the normal features, 2 eyes, nose, mouth, and ear, but their arrangement is distorted to present multiple viewpoints at once. Picasso was interested in showing more than what you can get from a photograph or traditional 2-dimensional image.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is this?
This work by Salvatore Albano depicts "The Fallen Angels" who, according to the Bible, were the angels who rebelled against God along with Lucifer, who became the Devil.
I see, thanks, now I can relate to this work.
You're welcome! Are you familiar with that Biblical story, is that what made it easier to relate to?
Yes, I am. Is that main one Lucifer?
Well it's possible the main figure, whom you sent the photo of, could be Lucifer himself, but that is just speculation. He does look very angry and determined though, I think.
Beautiful work, truly inspired.
I agree, I also love the contrast between the white marble of the sculpture and the dark stone of the base.
Yes! 
I love this serene, beautiful outdoor scene by Theodore Robinson! What drew you to this work?
The way it's painted and how gentle it is in the colors and the woman's expression. Also the fact that I don't know anything about the painter.
Theodore Robinson is considered one of the first American Impressionists, a movement that began in, and is largely associated with, France. William Merritt Chase and Childe Hassam, two artists whom we have on view on the 5th floor, are also considered American Impressionists.
The Impressionists were concerned with capturing fleeting moments resulting in often quickly painted works with visible, varying brushstrokes. There is another work by Robinson on that same wall as well as 2 works by Monet, a noted French Impressionist! Robinson even went to France to study with the French Impressionists and became close friends with Monet.
Loved the Monet paintings! Absolutely beautiful.
I agree, seeing Monet is always a treat! I especially love the reflection on the water in "The Doge's Palace," the colors are so vibrant.
Yes! One of my favorites! Was it always here? I feel like I've seen it somewhere else? Do you have any info on it?
Monet is famous for creating many versions of the "same" painting. Because the Impressionists were interested in light and capturing the effects, he would often sit at the same site for a long period of time, painting different canvases of the same thing at different times of the day to see the changing light effects. There is a painting at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in Manhattan that looks similar to this, yes! I do believe our version has also been on view for some time, so it's possible you've seen it here before as well.
I probably saw the one at The Met. I am from Brazil so this is my first time here.
Oh, well, welcome to Brooklyn! Yes, you may have seen the Met's version. Although, I think it is easy to confuse various paintings by Monet because the subject matter, colors, and style can be so similar.
That's true, thanks!
Of course!
Could you give me some information?
The subject of this painting is the sister-in-law of a friend of the artist, Henri Fantin-Latour. She was the wife of a businessman Leon Maitre. Fantin-Latour painted her three times. LaTour prefered painting quiet scenes of men and women he knew well. Like Madame Maitre, they often seem absorbed in their own interior world, a new development in society portraiture.
Surprisingly, considering how beautiful and mysterious this portrait is, the artist is best known for paintings of flowers and group portraits, not portraits of a single subject.
Is Mary supposed to be topless and this was censored?
I'm glad to see you're looking so closely at Maso di Banco's triptych. Mary is not meant to be topless, it appears as though her shirt is a sort of coral or salmon color, and the typical blue robe she is often seen wearing is draped around her. On occasion she is presented breast feeding (Madonna Lactans) the Christ Child which was seen as a sign of her compassion and does not seem to have caused offense.
This left-hand panel is separated into three 'scenes' in a vertical manner: the top scene shows the Annunciation, when the angel Gabriel came to tell Mary she would conceive Jesus. The middle scene shows the shepherds, who were told about the coming of Jesus by angels, and who visited Jesus, Mary and Joseph after Jesus' birth. And the bottom scene, that you sent a photo of, is a nativity scene. Jesus is in the manger, the Virgin Mary is relaxed next to the baby, and Joseph sits at the front, all three figures have halos above their heads. This way of showing a story in various scenes on top of each other is called a 'stacked composition' and was popular to help tell stories.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this?
This statue dates to a period when the Persian Empire controlled Egypt which explains the man's unusual clothing and jewelry. The high skirt tied at the chest is distinctly Persian as is the necklace, called a "torque," featuring ibexes. Despite the Persian garments, this man still wears an Egyptian-style wig and had Egyptian-style features.
I'd like to know what this is.
Simply put, this is a chair. The Ancient Egyptians invented chairs like this in the 2nd Dynasty and you can see similar seating depicted in some of the reliefs in the gallery. Animal feet--in this case lion--were popular on Ancient Egyptian chairs and the protrusions below the feet were designed to secure the chair in sockets.
Hi! That is the "Century Vase," made for the United States Centennial anniversary in 1876.
I bet you spotted the silhouette of George Washington already! If you keep looking, you will see many scenes from American history and images of American innovations including the sewing machine and telegraph poles! This work was meant to be publicly displayed and to act as a sort of advertisement for America's past, present, and future at that 100-year mark.
It was shown in Philadelphia in 1876, in a big exhibition that was open to the public to mark the Centennial. It had buildings and booths dedicated to various industries and trades, to art, etc. It was the first World's Fair held in the United States!
That's awesome! Super cool!
I agree! It was a major attraction. It took 10 years to plan, and it was held in the area that is present-day Fairmount Park.
How did the Brooklyn museum acquire it?
It was a gift from the descendants of the man who founded Union Porcelain Works, the Brooklyn-based company that made it.
In the erotic art from Ptolemaic Egypt, why are the proportions of the genitals so unrealistic?
Keeping in mind that such pieces were made to be deposited in tombs scholars think that the oversized genitals may represent the person's wish to be sexually potent in the afterlife. Also, this is strong symbolism for fertility, of course! Much of ancient Egyptian myth revolves around birth, death, and resurrection, the central story involves the god Osiris, who impregnated his wife, Isis, after he was dead, thus creating an heir, after the fact. And I can guess that the idea of fertility on all levels must have been so central to their culture, the crops, the livestock, the continuity of the royal line.
Just the other day, I saw some graffiti of a giant phallus (shall we say) in a subway station. Some things are universal!
I know in Pompeii they were placed everywhere as a symbol of good luck. (Not to lead you to a brothel, which is a common misconception). The idea is that a phallus makes you laugh, which wards off bad luck!
I like that idea, I guess. I might not put it into practice in my own home, though!
Is this sculpture broken or was this how the artist wanted the hand at the top to look? What does the hand mean?
It's meant to be that way! Rodin deliberately made many of his works to look rough and unfinished. He believed it gave his works a greater emotional impact as if you could feel the sculpture emerging from the raw material. It also differentiated his sculpture from the highly finished academic work of his contemporaries. “The artist must create a spark before he can make a fire and before art is born, the artist must ready to be consumed by the fire of his own creation,” Rodin said. As for the hand, this is part of the story of Orpheus. Orpheus was an amazingly gifted musician and singer. You might see that he's holding his lyre, a stringed instrument.
When his wife Eurydice died, he went down to the underworld and convinced the gods of the underworld by playing and singing for them to release her and send her back to the living world. But he had to promise not to look back as he and Eurydice went back up to the land of the living. He forgot, and looked back to check on Eurydice, thus losing her to the underworld again, permanently. That hand is all we see of Eurydice here.
What was Picasso thinking with this one?
That's a good question. You may already know, that Picasso was a pioneer of Cubism, a movement that was focused on distortion of perspective and reorganizing space and the components of the human figure.
The colors in this particular painting are influenced by the bleakness of World War II Europe. If you look carefully at the face, you can pick out all the normal features, 2 eyes, nose, mouth, and ear, but their arrangement is distorted to present multiple viewpoints at once. Picasso was interested in showing more than what you can get from a photograph or traditional 2-dimensional image.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is this?
This work by Salvatore Albano depicts "The Fallen Angels" who, according to the Bible, were the angels who rebelled against God along with Lucifer, who became the Devil.
I see, thanks, now I can relate to this work.
You're welcome! Are you familiar with that Biblical story, is that what made it easier to relate to?
Yes, I am. Is that main one Lucifer?
Well it's possible the main figure, whom you sent the photo of, could be Lucifer himself, but that is just speculation. He does look very angry and determined though, I think.
Beautiful work, truly inspired.
I agree, I also love the contrast between the white marble of the sculpture and the dark stone of the base.
Yes! 
I love this serene, beautiful outdoor scene by Theodore Robinson! What drew you to this work?
The way it's painted and how gentle it is in the colors and the woman's expression. Also the fact that I don't know anything about the painter.
Theodore Robinson is considered one of the first American Impressionists, a movement that began in, and is largely associated with, France. William Merritt Chase and Childe Hassam, two artists whom we have on view on the 5th floor, are also considered American Impressionists.
The Impressionists were concerned with capturing fleeting moments resulting in often quickly painted works with visible, varying brushstrokes. There is another work by Robinson on that same wall as well as 2 works by Monet, a noted French Impressionist! Robinson even went to France to study with the French Impressionists and became close friends with Monet.
Loved the Monet paintings! Absolutely beautiful.
I agree, seeing Monet is always a treat! I especially love the reflection on the water in "The Doge's Palace," the colors are so vibrant.
Yes! One of my favorites! Was it always here? I feel like I've seen it somewhere else? Do you have any info on it?
Monet is famous for creating many versions of the "same" painting. Because the Impressionists were interested in light and capturing the effects, he would often sit at the same site for a long period of time, painting different canvases of the same thing at different times of the day to see the changing light effects. There is a painting at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in Manhattan that looks similar to this, yes! I do believe our version has also been on view for some time, so it's possible you've seen it here before as well.
I probably saw the one at The Met. I am from Brazil so this is my first time here.
Oh, well, welcome to Brooklyn! Yes, you may have seen the Met's version. Although, I think it is easy to confuse various paintings by Monet because the subject matter, colors, and style can be so similar.
That's true, thanks!
Of course!
Could you give me some information?
The subject of this painting is the sister-in-law of a friend of the artist, Henri Fantin-Latour. She was the wife of a businessman Leon Maitre. Fantin-Latour painted her three times. LaTour prefered painting quiet scenes of men and women he knew well. Like Madame Maitre, they often seem absorbed in their own interior world, a new development in society portraiture.
Surprisingly, considering how beautiful and mysterious this portrait is, the artist is best known for paintings of flowers and group portraits, not portraits of a single subject.
Is Mary supposed to be topless and this was censored?
I'm glad to see you're looking so closely at Maso di Banco's triptych. Mary is not meant to be topless, it appears as though her shirt is a sort of coral or salmon color, and the typical blue robe she is often seen wearing is draped around her. On occasion she is presented breast feeding (Madonna Lactans) the Christ Child which was seen as a sign of her compassion and does not seem to have caused offense.
This left-hand panel is separated into three 'scenes' in a vertical manner: the top scene shows the Annunciation, when the angel Gabriel came to tell Mary she would conceive Jesus. The middle scene shows the shepherds, who were told about the coming of Jesus by angels, and who visited Jesus, Mary and Joseph after Jesus' birth. And the bottom scene, that you sent a photo of, is a nativity scene. Jesus is in the manger, the Virgin Mary is relaxed next to the baby, and Joseph sits at the front, all three figures have halos above their heads. This way of showing a story in various scenes on top of each other is called a 'stacked composition' and was popular to help tell stories.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this?
This statue dates to a period when the Persian Empire controlled Egypt which explains the man's unusual clothing and jewelry. The high skirt tied at the chest is distinctly Persian as is the necklace, called a "torque," featuring ibexes. Despite the Persian garments, this man still wears an Egyptian-style wig and had Egyptian-style features.
I'd like to know what this is.
Simply put, this is a chair. The Ancient Egyptians invented chairs like this in the 2nd Dynasty and you can see similar seating depicted in some of the reliefs in the gallery. Animal feet--in this case lion--were popular on Ancient Egyptian chairs and the protrusions below the feet were designed to secure the chair in sockets.
Hi! That is the "Century Vase," made for the United States Centennial anniversary in 1876.
I bet you spotted the silhouette of George Washington already! If you keep looking, you will see many scenes from American history and images of American innovations including the sewing machine and telegraph poles! This work was meant to be publicly displayed and to act as a sort of advertisement for America's past, present, and future at that 100-year mark.
It was shown in Philadelphia in 1876, in a big exhibition that was open to the public to mark the Centennial. It had buildings and booths dedicated to various industries and trades, to art, etc. It was the first World's Fair held in the United States!
That's awesome! Super cool!
I agree! It was a major attraction. It took 10 years to plan, and it was held in the area that is present-day Fairmount Park.
How did the Brooklyn museum acquire it?
It was a gift from the descendants of the man who founded Union Porcelain Works, the Brooklyn-based company that made it.
In the erotic art from Ptolemaic Egypt, why are the proportions of the genitals so unrealistic?
Keeping in mind that such pieces were made to be deposited in tombs scholars think that the oversized genitals may represent the person's wish to be sexually potent in the afterlife. Also, this is strong symbolism for fertility, of course! Much of ancient Egyptian myth revolves around birth, death, and resurrection, the central story involves the god Osiris, who impregnated his wife, Isis, after he was dead, thus creating an heir, after the fact. And I can guess that the idea of fertility on all levels must have been so central to their culture, the crops, the livestock, the continuity of the royal line.
Just the other day, I saw some graffiti of a giant phallus (shall we say) in a subway station. Some things are universal!
I know in Pompeii they were placed everywhere as a symbol of good luck. (Not to lead you to a brothel, which is a common misconception). The idea is that a phallus makes you laugh, which wards off bad luck!
I like that idea, I guess. I might not put it into practice in my own home, though!
Is this sculpture broken or was this how the artist wanted the hand at the top to look? What does the hand mean?
It's meant to be that way! Rodin deliberately made many of his works to look rough and unfinished. He believed it gave his works a greater emotional impact as if you could feel the sculpture emerging from the raw material. It also differentiated his sculpture from the highly finished academic work of his contemporaries. “The artist must create a spark before he can make a fire and before art is born, the artist must ready to be consumed by the fire of his own creation,” Rodin said. As for the hand, this is part of the story of Orpheus. Orpheus was an amazingly gifted musician and singer. You might see that he's holding his lyre, a stringed instrument.
When his wife Eurydice died, he went down to the underworld and convinced the gods of the underworld by playing and singing for them to release her and send her back to the living world. But he had to promise not to look back as he and Eurydice went back up to the land of the living. He forgot, and looked back to check on Eurydice, thus losing her to the underworld again, permanently. That hand is all we see of Eurydice here.
What was Picasso thinking with this one?
That's a good question. You may already know, that Picasso was a pioneer of Cubism, a movement that was focused on distortion of perspective and reorganizing space and the components of the human figure.
The colors in this particular painting are influenced by the bleakness of World War II Europe. If you look carefully at the face, you can pick out all the normal features, 2 eyes, nose, mouth, and ear, but their arrangement is distorted to present multiple viewpoints at once. Picasso was interested in showing more than what you can get from a photograph or traditional 2-dimensional image.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is this?
This work by Salvatore Albano depicts "The Fallen Angels" who, according to the Bible, were the angels who rebelled against God along with Lucifer, who became the Devil.
I see, thanks, now I can relate to this work.
You're welcome! Are you familiar with that Biblical story, is that what made it easier to relate to?
Yes, I am. Is that main one Lucifer?
Well it's possible the main figure, whom you sent the photo of, could be Lucifer himself, but that is just speculation. He does look very angry and determined though, I think.
Beautiful work, truly inspired.
I agree, I also love the contrast between the white marble of the sculpture and the dark stone of the base.
Yes! 
I love this serene, beautiful outdoor scene by Theodore Robinson! What drew you to this work?
The way it's painted and how gentle it is in the colors and the woman's expression. Also the fact that I don't know anything about the painter.
Theodore Robinson is considered one of the first American Impressionists, a movement that began in, and is largely associated with, France. William Merritt Chase and Childe Hassam, two artists whom we have on view on the 5th floor, are also considered American Impressionists.
The Impressionists were concerned with capturing fleeting moments resulting in often quickly painted works with visible, varying brushstrokes. There is another work by Robinson on that same wall as well as 2 works by Monet, a noted French Impressionist! Robinson even went to France to study with the French Impressionists and became close friends with Monet.
Loved the Monet paintings! Absolutely beautiful.
I agree, seeing Monet is always a treat! I especially love the reflection on the water in "The Doge's Palace," the colors are so vibrant.
Yes! One of my favorites! Was it always here? I feel like I've seen it somewhere else? Do you have any info on it?
Monet is famous for creating many versions of the "same" painting. Because the Impressionists were interested in light and capturing the effects, he would often sit at the same site for a long period of time, painting different canvases of the same thing at different times of the day to see the changing light effects. There is a painting at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in Manhattan that looks similar to this, yes! I do believe our version has also been on view for some time, so it's possible you've seen it here before as well.
I probably saw the one at The Met. I am from Brazil so this is my first time here.
Oh, well, welcome to Brooklyn! Yes, you may have seen the Met's version. Although, I think it is easy to confuse various paintings by Monet because the subject matter, colors, and style can be so similar.
That's true, thanks!
Of course!
Could you give me some information?
The subject of this painting is the sister-in-law of a friend of the artist, Henri Fantin-Latour. She was the wife of a businessman Leon Maitre. Fantin-Latour painted her three times. LaTour prefered painting quiet scenes of men and women he knew well. Like Madame Maitre, they often seem absorbed in their own interior world, a new development in society portraiture.
Surprisingly, considering how beautiful and mysterious this portrait is, the artist is best known for paintings of flowers and group portraits, not portraits of a single subject.
Is Mary supposed to be topless and this was censored?
I'm glad to see you're looking so closely at Maso di Banco's triptych. Mary is not meant to be topless, it appears as though her shirt is a sort of coral or salmon color, and the typical blue robe she is often seen wearing is draped around her. On occasion she is presented breast feeding (Madonna Lactans) the Christ Child which was seen as a sign of her compassion and does not seem to have caused offense.
This left-hand panel is separated into three 'scenes' in a vertical manner: the top scene shows the Annunciation, when the angel Gabriel came to tell Mary she would conceive Jesus. The middle scene shows the shepherds, who were told about the coming of Jesus by angels, and who visited Jesus, Mary and Joseph after Jesus' birth. And the bottom scene, that you sent a photo of, is a nativity scene. Jesus is in the manger, the Virgin Mary is relaxed next to the baby, and Joseph sits at the front, all three figures have halos above their heads. This way of showing a story in various scenes on top of each other is called a 'stacked composition' and was popular to help tell stories.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this?
This statue dates to a period when the Persian Empire controlled Egypt which explains the man's unusual clothing and jewelry. The high skirt tied at the chest is distinctly Persian as is the necklace, called a "torque," featuring ibexes. Despite the Persian garments, this man still wears an Egyptian-style wig and had Egyptian-style features.
I'd like to know what this is.
Simply put, this is a chair. The Ancient Egyptians invented chairs like this in the 2nd Dynasty and you can see similar seating depicted in some of the reliefs in the gallery. Animal feet--in this case lion--were popular on Ancient Egyptian chairs and the protrusions below the feet were designed to secure the chair in sockets.
Hi! That is the "Century Vase," made for the United States Centennial anniversary in 1876.
I bet you spotted the silhouette of George Washington already! If you keep looking, you will see many scenes from American history and images of American innovations including the sewing machine and telegraph poles! This work was meant to be publicly displayed and to act as a sort of advertisement for America's past, present, and future at that 100-year mark.
It was shown in Philadelphia in 1876, in a big exhibition that was open to the public to mark the Centennial. It had buildings and booths dedicated to various industries and trades, to art, etc. It was the first World's Fair held in the United States!
That's awesome! Super cool!
I agree! It was a major attraction. It took 10 years to plan, and it was held in the area that is present-day Fairmount Park.
How did the Brooklyn museum acquire it?
It was a gift from the descendants of the man who founded Union Porcelain Works, the Brooklyn-based company that made it.
In the erotic art from Ptolemaic Egypt, why are the proportions of the genitals so unrealistic?
Keeping in mind that such pieces were made to be deposited in tombs scholars think that the oversized genitals may represent the person's wish to be sexually potent in the afterlife. Also, this is strong symbolism for fertility, of course! Much of ancient Egyptian myth revolves around birth, death, and resurrection, the central story involves the god Osiris, who impregnated his wife, Isis, after he was dead, thus creating an heir, after the fact. And I can guess that the idea of fertility on all levels must have been so central to their culture, the crops, the livestock, the continuity of the royal line.
Just the other day, I saw some graffiti of a giant phallus (shall we say) in a subway station. Some things are universal!
I know in Pompeii they were placed everywhere as a symbol of good luck. (Not to lead you to a brothel, which is a common misconception). The idea is that a phallus makes you laugh, which wards off bad luck!
I like that idea, I guess. I might not put it into practice in my own home, though!
Is this sculpture broken or was this how the artist wanted the hand at the top to look? What does the hand mean?
It's meant to be that way! Rodin deliberately made many of his works to look rough and unfinished. He believed it gave his works a greater emotional impact as if you could feel the sculpture emerging from the raw material. It also differentiated his sculpture from the highly finished academic work of his contemporaries. “The artist must create a spark before he can make a fire and before art is born, the artist must ready to be consumed by the fire of his own creation,” Rodin said. As for the hand, this is part of the story of Orpheus. Orpheus was an amazingly gifted musician and singer. You might see that he's holding his lyre, a stringed instrument.
When his wife Eurydice died, he went down to the underworld and convinced the gods of the underworld by playing and singing for them to release her and send her back to the living world. But he had to promise not to look back as he and Eurydice went back up to the land of the living. He forgot, and looked back to check on Eurydice, thus losing her to the underworld again, permanently. That hand is all we see of Eurydice here.
What was Picasso thinking with this one?
That's a good question. You may already know, that Picasso was a pioneer of Cubism, a movement that was focused on distortion of perspective and reorganizing space and the components of the human figure.
The colors in this particular painting are influenced by the bleakness of World War II Europe. If you look carefully at the face, you can pick out all the normal features, 2 eyes, nose, mouth, and ear, but their arrangement is distorted to present multiple viewpoints at once. Picasso was interested in showing more than what you can get from a photograph or traditional 2-dimensional image.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is this?
This work by Salvatore Albano depicts "The Fallen Angels" who, according to the Bible, were the angels who rebelled against God along with Lucifer, who became the Devil.
I see, thanks, now I can relate to this work.
You're welcome! Are you familiar with that Biblical story, is that what made it easier to relate to?
Yes, I am. Is that main one Lucifer?
Well it's possible the main figure, whom you sent the photo of, could be Lucifer himself, but that is just speculation. He does look very angry and determined though, I think.
Beautiful work, truly inspired.
I agree, I also love the contrast between the white marble of the sculpture and the dark stone of the base.
Yes! 
I love this serene, beautiful outdoor scene by Theodore Robinson! What drew you to this work?
The way it's painted and how gentle it is in the colors and the woman's expression. Also the fact that I don't know anything about the painter.
Theodore Robinson is considered one of the first American Impressionists, a movement that began in, and is largely associated with, France. William Merritt Chase and Childe Hassam, two artists whom we have on view on the 5th floor, are also considered American Impressionists.
The Impressionists were concerned with capturing fleeting moments resulting in often quickly painted works with visible, varying brushstrokes. There is another work by Robinson on that same wall as well as 2 works by Monet, a noted French Impressionist! Robinson even went to France to study with the French Impressionists and became close friends with Monet.
Loved the Monet paintings! Absolutely beautiful.
I agree, seeing Monet is always a treat! I especially love the reflection on the water in "The Doge's Palace," the colors are so vibrant.
Yes! One of my favorites! Was it always here? I feel like I've seen it somewhere else? Do you have any info on it?
Monet is famous for creating many versions of the "same" painting. Because the Impressionists were interested in light and capturing the effects, he would often sit at the same site for a long period of time, painting different canvases of the same thing at different times of the day to see the changing light effects. There is a painting at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in Manhattan that looks similar to this, yes! I do believe our version has also been on view for some time, so it's possible you've seen it here before as well.
I probably saw the one at The Met. I am from Brazil so this is my first time here.
Oh, well, welcome to Brooklyn! Yes, you may have seen the Met's version. Although, I think it is easy to confuse various paintings by Monet because the subject matter, colors, and style can be so similar.
That's true, thanks!
Of course!
Could you give me some information?
The subject of this painting is the sister-in-law of a friend of the artist, Henri Fantin-Latour. She was the wife of a businessman Leon Maitre. Fantin-Latour painted her three times. LaTour prefered painting quiet scenes of men and women he knew well. Like Madame Maitre, they often seem absorbed in their own interior world, a new development in society portraiture.
Surprisingly, considering how beautiful and mysterious this portrait is, the artist is best known for paintings of flowers and group portraits, not portraits of a single subject.
Is Mary supposed to be topless and this was censored?
I'm glad to see you're looking so closely at Maso di Banco's triptych. Mary is not meant to be topless, it appears as though her shirt is a sort of coral or salmon color, and the typical blue robe she is often seen wearing is draped around her. On occasion she is presented breast feeding (Madonna Lactans) the Christ Child which was seen as a sign of her compassion and does not seem to have caused offense.
This left-hand panel is separated into three 'scenes' in a vertical manner: the top scene shows the Annunciation, when the angel Gabriel came to tell Mary she would conceive Jesus. The middle scene shows the shepherds, who were told about the coming of Jesus by angels, and who visited Jesus, Mary and Joseph after Jesus' birth. And the bottom scene, that you sent a photo of, is a nativity scene. Jesus is in the manger, the Virgin Mary is relaxed next to the baby, and Joseph sits at the front, all three figures have halos above their heads. This way of showing a story in various scenes on top of each other is called a 'stacked composition' and was popular to help tell stories.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this?
This statue dates to a period when the Persian Empire controlled Egypt which explains the man's unusual clothing and jewelry. The high skirt tied at the chest is distinctly Persian as is the necklace, called a "torque," featuring ibexes. Despite the Persian garments, this man still wears an Egyptian-style wig and had Egyptian-style features.
I'd like to know what this is.
Simply put, this is a chair. The Ancient Egyptians invented chairs like this in the 2nd Dynasty and you can see similar seating depicted in some of the reliefs in the gallery. Animal feet--in this case lion--were popular on Ancient Egyptian chairs and the protrusions below the feet were designed to secure the chair in sockets.
Hi! That is the "Century Vase," made for the United States Centennial anniversary in 1876.
I bet you spotted the silhouette of George Washington already! If you keep looking, you will see many scenes from American history and images of American innovations including the sewing machine and telegraph poles! This work was meant to be publicly displayed and to act as a sort of advertisement for America's past, present, and future at that 100-year mark.
It was shown in Philadelphia in 1876, in a big exhibition that was open to the public to mark the Centennial. It had buildings and booths dedicated to various industries and trades, to art, etc. It was the first World's Fair held in the United States!
That's awesome! Super cool!
I agree! It was a major attraction. It took 10 years to plan, and it was held in the area that is present-day Fairmount Park.
How did the Brooklyn museum acquire it?
It was a gift from the descendants of the man who founded Union Porcelain Works, the Brooklyn-based company that made it.
In the erotic art from Ptolemaic Egypt, why are the proportions of the genitals so unrealistic?
Keeping in mind that such pieces were made to be deposited in tombs scholars think that the oversized genitals may represent the person's wish to be sexually potent in the afterlife. Also, this is strong symbolism for fertility, of course! Much of ancient Egyptian myth revolves around birth, death, and resurrection, the central story involves the god Osiris, who impregnated his wife, Isis, after he was dead, thus creating an heir, after the fact. And I can guess that the idea of fertility on all levels must have been so central to their culture, the crops, the livestock, the continuity of the royal line.
Just the other day, I saw some graffiti of a giant phallus (shall we say) in a subway station. Some things are universal!
I know in Pompeii they were placed everywhere as a symbol of good luck. (Not to lead you to a brothel, which is a common misconception). The idea is that a phallus makes you laugh, which wards off bad luck!
I like that idea, I guess. I might not put it into practice in my own home, though!
Is this sculpture broken or was this how the artist wanted the hand at the top to look? What does the hand mean?
It's meant to be that way! Rodin deliberately made many of his works to look rough and unfinished. He believed it gave his works a greater emotional impact as if you could feel the sculpture emerging from the raw material. It also differentiated his sculpture from the highly finished academic work of his contemporaries. “The artist must create a spark before he can make a fire and before art is born, the artist must ready to be consumed by the fire of his own creation,” Rodin said. As for the hand, this is part of the story of Orpheus. Orpheus was an amazingly gifted musician and singer. You might see that he's holding his lyre, a stringed instrument.
When his wife Eurydice died, he went down to the underworld and convinced the gods of the underworld by playing and singing for them to release her and send her back to the living world. But he had to promise not to look back as he and Eurydice went back up to the land of the living. He forgot, and looked back to check on Eurydice, thus losing her to the underworld again, permanently. That hand is all we see of Eurydice here.
What was Picasso thinking with this one?
That's a good question. You may already know, that Picasso was a pioneer of Cubism, a movement that was focused on distortion of perspective and reorganizing space and the components of the human figure.
The colors in this particular painting are influenced by the bleakness of World War II Europe. If you look carefully at the face, you can pick out all the normal features, 2 eyes, nose, mouth, and ear, but their arrangement is distorted to present multiple viewpoints at once. Picasso was interested in showing more than what you can get from a photograph or traditional 2-dimensional image.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Have small plates, dinner, or drinks at The Norm restaurant and bar, led by Michelin-starred Chef Saul Bolton. Or stop by the BKM Café or Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group.

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is this?
This work by Salvatore Albano depicts "The Fallen Angels" who, according to the Bible, were the angels who rebelled against God along with Lucifer, who became the Devil.
I see, thanks, now I can relate to this work.
You're welcome! Are you familiar with that Biblical story, is that what made it easier to relate to?
Yes, I am. Is that main one Lucifer?
Well it's possible the main figure, whom you sent the photo of, could be Lucifer himself, but that is just speculation. He does look very angry and determined though, I think.
Beautiful work, truly inspired.
I agree, I also love the contrast between the white marble of the sculpture and the dark stone of the base.
Yes! 
I love this serene, beautiful outdoor scene by Theodore Robinson! What drew you to this work?
The way it's painted and how gentle it is in the colors and the woman's expression. Also the fact that I don't know anything about the painter.
Theodore Robinson is considered one of the first American Impressionists, a movement that began in, and is largely associated with, France. William Merritt Chase and Childe Hassam, two artists whom we have on view on the 5th floor, are also considered American Impressionists.
The Impressionists were concerned with capturing fleeting moments resulting in often quickly painted works with visible, varying brushstrokes. There is another work by Robinson on that same wall as well as 2 works by Monet, a noted French Impressionist! Robinson even went to France to study with the French Impressionists and became close friends with Monet.
Loved the Monet paintings! Absolutely beautiful.
I agree, seeing Monet is always a treat! I especially love the reflection on the water in "The Doge's Palace," the colors are so vibrant.
Yes! One of my favorites! Was it always here? I feel like I've seen it somewhere else? Do you have any info on it?
Monet is famous for creating many versions of the "same" painting. Because the Impressionists were interested in light and capturing the effects, he would often sit at the same site for a long period of time, painting different canvases of the same thing at different times of the day to see the changing light effects. There is a painting at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in Manhattan that looks similar to this, yes! I do believe our version has also been on view for some time, so it's possible you've seen it here before as well.
I probably saw the one at The Met. I am from Brazil so this is my first time here.
Oh, well, welcome to Brooklyn! Yes, you may have seen the Met's version. Although, I think it is easy to confuse various paintings by Monet because the subject matter, colors, and style can be so similar.
That's true, thanks!
Of course!
Could you give me some information?
The subject of this painting is the sister-in-law of a friend of the artist, Henri Fantin-Latour. She was the wife of a businessman Leon Maitre. Fantin-Latour painted her three times. LaTour prefered painting quiet scenes of men and women he knew well. Like Madame Maitre, they often seem absorbed in their own interior world, a new development in society portraiture.
Surprisingly, considering how beautiful and mysterious this portrait is, the artist is best known for paintings of flowers and group portraits, not portraits of a single subject.
Is Mary supposed to be topless and this was censored?
I'm glad to see you're looking so closely at Maso di Banco's triptych. Mary is not meant to be topless, it appears as though her shirt is a sort of coral or salmon color, and the typical blue robe she is often seen wearing is draped around her. On occasion she is presented breast feeding (Madonna Lactans) the Christ Child which was seen as a sign of her compassion and does not seem to have caused offense.
This left-hand panel is separated into three 'scenes' in a vertical manner: the top scene shows the Annunciation, when the angel Gabriel came to tell Mary she would conceive Jesus. The middle scene shows the shepherds, who were told about the coming of Jesus by angels, and who visited Jesus, Mary and Joseph after Jesus' birth. And the bottom scene, that you sent a photo of, is a nativity scene. Jesus is in the manger, the Virgin Mary is relaxed next to the baby, and Joseph sits at the front, all three figures have halos above their heads. This way of showing a story in various scenes on top of each other is called a 'stacked composition' and was popular to help tell stories.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this?
This statue dates to a period when the Persian Empire controlled Egypt which explains the man's unusual clothing and jewelry. The high skirt tied at the chest is distinctly Persian as is the necklace, called a "torque," featuring ibexes. Despite the Persian garments, this man still wears an Egyptian-style wig and had Egyptian-style features.
I'd like to know what this is.
Simply put, this is a chair. The Ancient Egyptians invented chairs like this in the 2nd Dynasty and you can see similar seating depicted in some of the reliefs in the gallery. Animal feet--in this case lion--were popular on Ancient Egyptian chairs and the protrusions below the feet were designed to secure the chair in sockets.
Hi! That is the "Century Vase," made for the United States Centennial anniversary in 1876.
I bet you spotted the silhouette of George Washington already! If you keep looking, you will see many scenes from American history and images of American innovations including the sewing machine and telegraph poles! This work was meant to be publicly displayed and to act as a sort of advertisement for America's past, present, and future at that 100-year mark.
It was shown in Philadelphia in 1876, in a big exhibition that was open to the public to mark the Centennial. It had buildings and booths dedicated to various industries and trades, to art, etc. It was the first World's Fair held in the United States!
That's awesome! Super cool!
I agree! It was a major attraction. It took 10 years to plan, and it was held in the area that is present-day Fairmount Park.
How did the Brooklyn museum acquire it?
It was a gift from the descendants of the man who founded Union Porcelain Works, the Brooklyn-based company that made it.
In the erotic art from Ptolemaic Egypt, why are the proportions of the genitals so unrealistic?
Keeping in mind that such pieces were made to be deposited in tombs scholars think that the oversized genitals may represent the person's wish to be sexually potent in the afterlife. Also, this is strong symbolism for fertility, of course! Much of ancient Egyptian myth revolves around birth, death, and resurrection, the central story involves the god Osiris, who impregnated his wife, Isis, after he was dead, thus creating an heir, after the fact. And I can guess that the idea of fertility on all levels must have been so central to their culture, the crops, the livestock, the continuity of the royal line.
Just the other day, I saw some graffiti of a giant phallus (shall we say) in a subway station. Some things are universal!
I know in Pompeii they were placed everywhere as a symbol of good luck. (Not to lead you to a brothel, which is a common misconception). The idea is that a phallus makes you laugh, which wards off bad luck!
I like that idea, I guess. I might not put it into practice in my own home, though!
Is this sculpture broken or was this how the artist wanted the hand at the top to look? What does the hand mean?
It's meant to be that way! Rodin deliberately made many of his works to look rough and unfinished. He believed it gave his works a greater emotional impact as if you could feel the sculpture emerging from the raw material. It also differentiated his sculpture from the highly finished academic work of his contemporaries. “The artist must create a spark before he can make a fire and before art is born, the artist must ready to be consumed by the fire of his own creation,” Rodin said. As for the hand, this is part of the story of Orpheus. Orpheus was an amazingly gifted musician and singer. You might see that he's holding his lyre, a stringed instrument.
When his wife Eurydice died, he went down to the underworld and convinced the gods of the underworld by playing and singing for them to release her and send her back to the living world. But he had to promise not to look back as he and Eurydice went back up to the land of the living. He forgot, and looked back to check on Eurydice, thus losing her to the underworld again, permanently. That hand is all we see of Eurydice here.
What was Picasso thinking with this one?
That's a good question. You may already know, that Picasso was a pioneer of Cubism, a movement that was focused on distortion of perspective and reorganizing space and the components of the human figure.
The colors in this particular painting are influenced by the bleakness of World War II Europe. If you look carefully at the face, you can pick out all the normal features, 2 eyes, nose, mouth, and ear, but their arrangement is distorted to present multiple viewpoints at once. Picasso was interested in showing more than what you can get from a photograph or traditional 2-dimensional image.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is this?
This work by Salvatore Albano depicts "The Fallen Angels" who, according to the Bible, were the angels who rebelled against God along with Lucifer, who became the Devil.
I see, thanks, now I can relate to this work.
You're welcome! Are you familiar with that Biblical story, is that what made it easier to relate to?
Yes, I am. Is that main one Lucifer?
Well it's possible the main figure, whom you sent the photo of, could be Lucifer himself, but that is just speculation. He does look very angry and determined though, I think.
Beautiful work, truly inspired.
I agree, I also love the contrast between the white marble of the sculpture and the dark stone of the base.
Yes! 
I love this serene, beautiful outdoor scene by Theodore Robinson! What drew you to this work?
The way it's painted and how gentle it is in the colors and the woman's expression. Also the fact that I don't know anything about the painter.
Theodore Robinson is considered one of the first American Impressionists, a movement that began in, and is largely associated with, France. William Merritt Chase and Childe Hassam, two artists whom we have on view on the 5th floor, are also considered American Impressionists.
The Impressionists were concerned with capturing fleeting moments resulting in often quickly painted works with visible, varying brushstrokes. There is another work by Robinson on that same wall as well as 2 works by Monet, a noted French Impressionist! Robinson even went to France to study with the French Impressionists and became close friends with Monet.
Loved the Monet paintings! Absolutely beautiful.
I agree, seeing Monet is always a treat! I especially love the reflection on the water in "The Doge's Palace," the colors are so vibrant.
Yes! One of my favorites! Was it always here? I feel like I've seen it somewhere else? Do you have any info on it?
Monet is famous for creating many versions of the "same" painting. Because the Impressionists were interested in light and capturing the effects, he would often sit at the same site for a long period of time, painting different canvases of the same thing at different times of the day to see the changing light effects. There is a painting at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in Manhattan that looks similar to this, yes! I do believe our version has also been on view for some time, so it's possible you've seen it here before as well.
I probably saw the one at The Met. I am from Brazil so this is my first time here.
Oh, well, welcome to Brooklyn! Yes, you may have seen the Met's version. Although, I think it is easy to confuse various paintings by Monet because the subject matter, colors, and style can be so similar.
That's true, thanks!
Of course!
Could you give me some information?
The subject of this painting is the sister-in-law of a friend of the artist, Henri Fantin-Latour. She was the wife of a businessman Leon Maitre. Fantin-Latour painted her three times. LaTour prefered painting quiet scenes of men and women he knew well. Like Madame Maitre, they often seem absorbed in their own interior world, a new development in society portraiture.
Surprisingly, considering how beautiful and mysterious this portrait is, the artist is best known for paintings of flowers and group portraits, not portraits of a single subject.
Is Mary supposed to be topless and this was censored?
I'm glad to see you're looking so closely at Maso di Banco's triptych. Mary is not meant to be topless, it appears as though her shirt is a sort of coral or salmon color, and the typical blue robe she is often seen wearing is draped around her. On occasion she is presented breast feeding (Madonna Lactans) the Christ Child which was seen as a sign of her compassion and does not seem to have caused offense.
This left-hand panel is separated into three 'scenes' in a vertical manner: the top scene shows the Annunciation, when the angel Gabriel came to tell Mary she would conceive Jesus. The middle scene shows the shepherds, who were told about the coming of Jesus by angels, and who visited Jesus, Mary and Joseph after Jesus' birth. And the bottom scene, that you sent a photo of, is a nativity scene. Jesus is in the manger, the Virgin Mary is relaxed next to the baby, and Joseph sits at the front, all three figures have halos above their heads. This way of showing a story in various scenes on top of each other is called a 'stacked composition' and was popular to help tell stories.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this?
This statue dates to a period when the Persian Empire controlled Egypt which explains the man's unusual clothing and jewelry. The high skirt tied at the chest is distinctly Persian as is the necklace, called a "torque," featuring ibexes. Despite the Persian garments, this man still wears an Egyptian-style wig and had Egyptian-style features.
I'd like to know what this is.
Simply put, this is a chair. The Ancient Egyptians invented chairs like this in the 2nd Dynasty and you can see similar seating depicted in some of the reliefs in the gallery. Animal feet--in this case lion--were popular on Ancient Egyptian chairs and the protrusions below the feet were designed to secure the chair in sockets.
Hi! That is the "Century Vase," made for the United States Centennial anniversary in 1876.
I bet you spotted the silhouette of George Washington already! If you keep looking, you will see many scenes from American history and images of American innovations including the sewing machine and telegraph poles! This work was meant to be publicly displayed and to act as a sort of advertisement for America's past, present, and future at that 100-year mark.
It was shown in Philadelphia in 1876, in a big exhibition that was open to the public to mark the Centennial. It had buildings and booths dedicated to various industries and trades, to art, etc. It was the first World's Fair held in the United States!
That's awesome! Super cool!
I agree! It was a major attraction. It took 10 years to plan, and it was held in the area that is present-day Fairmount Park.
How did the Brooklyn museum acquire it?
It was a gift from the descendants of the man who founded Union Porcelain Works, the Brooklyn-based company that made it.
In the erotic art from Ptolemaic Egypt, why are the proportions of the genitals so unrealistic?
Keeping in mind that such pieces were made to be deposited in tombs scholars think that the oversized genitals may represent the person's wish to be sexually potent in the afterlife. Also, this is strong symbolism for fertility, of course! Much of ancient Egyptian myth revolves around birth, death, and resurrection, the central story involves the god Osiris, who impregnated his wife, Isis, after he was dead, thus creating an heir, after the fact. And I can guess that the idea of fertility on all levels must have been so central to their culture, the crops, the livestock, the continuity of the royal line.
Just the other day, I saw some graffiti of a giant phallus (shall we say) in a subway station. Some things are universal!
I know in Pompeii they were placed everywhere as a symbol of good luck. (Not to lead you to a brothel, which is a common misconception). The idea is that a phallus makes you laugh, which wards off bad luck!
I like that idea, I guess. I might not put it into practice in my own home, though!
Is this sculpture broken or was this how the artist wanted the hand at the top to look? What does the hand mean?
It's meant to be that way! Rodin deliberately made many of his works to look rough and unfinished. He believed it gave his works a greater emotional impact as if you could feel the sculpture emerging from the raw material. It also differentiated his sculpture from the highly finished academic work of his contemporaries. “The artist must create a spark before he can make a fire and before art is born, the artist must ready to be consumed by the fire of his own creation,” Rodin said. As for the hand, this is part of the story of Orpheus. Orpheus was an amazingly gifted musician and singer. You might see that he's holding his lyre, a stringed instrument.
When his wife Eurydice died, he went down to the underworld and convinced the gods of the underworld by playing and singing for them to release her and send her back to the living world. But he had to promise not to look back as he and Eurydice went back up to the land of the living. He forgot, and looked back to check on Eurydice, thus losing her to the underworld again, permanently. That hand is all we see of Eurydice here.
What was Picasso thinking with this one?
That's a good question. You may already know, that Picasso was a pioneer of Cubism, a movement that was focused on distortion of perspective and reorganizing space and the components of the human figure.
The colors in this particular painting are influenced by the bleakness of World War II Europe. If you look carefully at the face, you can pick out all the normal features, 2 eyes, nose, mouth, and ear, but their arrangement is distorted to present multiple viewpoints at once. Picasso was interested in showing more than what you can get from a photograph or traditional 2-dimensional image.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is this?
This work by Salvatore Albano depicts "The Fallen Angels" who, according to the Bible, were the angels who rebelled against God along with Lucifer, who became the Devil.
I see, thanks, now I can relate to this work.
You're welcome! Are you familiar with that Biblical story, is that what made it easier to relate to?
Yes, I am. Is that main one Lucifer?
Well it's possible the main figure, whom you sent the photo of, could be Lucifer himself, but that is just speculation. He does look very angry and determined though, I think.
Beautiful work, truly inspired.
I agree, I also love the contrast between the white marble of the sculpture and the dark stone of the base.
Yes! 
I love this serene, beautiful outdoor scene by Theodore Robinson! What drew you to this work?
The way it's painted and how gentle it is in the colors and the woman's expression. Also the fact that I don't know anything about the painter.
Theodore Robinson is considered one of the first American Impressionists, a movement that began in, and is largely associated with, France. William Merritt Chase and Childe Hassam, two artists whom we have on view on the 5th floor, are also considered American Impressionists.
The Impressionists were concerned with capturing fleeting moments resulting in often quickly painted works with visible, varying brushstrokes. There is another work by Robinson on that same wall as well as 2 works by Monet, a noted French Impressionist! Robinson even went to France to study with the French Impressionists and became close friends with Monet.
Loved the Monet paintings! Absolutely beautiful.
I agree, seeing Monet is always a treat! I especially love the reflection on the water in "The Doge's Palace," the colors are so vibrant.
Yes! One of my favorites! Was it always here? I feel like I've seen it somewhere else? Do you have any info on it?
Monet is famous for creating many versions of the "same" painting. Because the Impressionists were interested in light and capturing the effects, he would often sit at the same site for a long period of time, painting different canvases of the same thing at different times of the day to see the changing light effects. There is a painting at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in Manhattan that looks similar to this, yes! I do believe our version has also been on view for some time, so it's possible you've seen it here before as well.
I probably saw the one at The Met. I am from Brazil so this is my first time here.
Oh, well, welcome to Brooklyn! Yes, you may have seen the Met's version. Although, I think it is easy to confuse various paintings by Monet because the subject matter, colors, and style can be so similar.
That's true, thanks!
Of course!
Could you give me some information?
The subject of this painting is the sister-in-law of a friend of the artist, Henri Fantin-Latour. She was the wife of a businessman Leon Maitre. Fantin-Latour painted her three times. LaTour prefered painting quiet scenes of men and women he knew well. Like Madame Maitre, they often seem absorbed in their own interior world, a new development in society portraiture.
Surprisingly, considering how beautiful and mysterious this portrait is, the artist is best known for paintings of flowers and group portraits, not portraits of a single subject.
Is Mary supposed to be topless and this was censored?
I'm glad to see you're looking so closely at Maso di Banco's triptych. Mary is not meant to be topless, it appears as though her shirt is a sort of coral or salmon color, and the typical blue robe she is often seen wearing is draped around her. On occasion she is presented breast feeding (Madonna Lactans) the Christ Child which was seen as a sign of her compassion and does not seem to have caused offense.
This left-hand panel is separated into three 'scenes' in a vertical manner: the top scene shows the Annunciation, when the angel Gabriel came to tell Mary she would conceive Jesus. The middle scene shows the shepherds, who were told about the coming of Jesus by angels, and who visited Jesus, Mary and Joseph after Jesus' birth. And the bottom scene, that you sent a photo of, is a nativity scene. Jesus is in the manger, the Virgin Mary is relaxed next to the baby, and Joseph sits at the front, all three figures have halos above their heads. This way of showing a story in various scenes on top of each other is called a 'stacked composition' and was popular to help tell stories.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this?
This statue dates to a period when the Persian Empire controlled Egypt which explains the man's unusual clothing and jewelry. The high skirt tied at the chest is distinctly Persian as is the necklace, called a "torque," featuring ibexes. Despite the Persian garments, this man still wears an Egyptian-style wig and had Egyptian-style features.
I'd like to know what this is.
Simply put, this is a chair. The Ancient Egyptians invented chairs like this in the 2nd Dynasty and you can see similar seating depicted in some of the reliefs in the gallery. Animal feet--in this case lion--were popular on Ancient Egyptian chairs and the protrusions below the feet were designed to secure the chair in sockets.
Hi! That is the "Century Vase," made for the United States Centennial anniversary in 1876.
I bet you spotted the silhouette of George Washington already! If you keep looking, you will see many scenes from American history and images of American innovations including the sewing machine and telegraph poles! This work was meant to be publicly displayed and to act as a sort of advertisement for America's past, present, and future at that 100-year mark.
It was shown in Philadelphia in 1876, in a big exhibition that was open to the public to mark the Centennial. It had buildings and booths dedicated to various industries and trades, to art, etc. It was the first World's Fair held in the United States!
That's awesome! Super cool!
I agree! It was a major attraction. It took 10 years to plan, and it was held in the area that is present-day Fairmount Park.
How did the Brooklyn museum acquire it?
It was a gift from the descendants of the man who founded Union Porcelain Works, the Brooklyn-based company that made it.
In the erotic art from Ptolemaic Egypt, why are the proportions of the genitals so unrealistic?
Keeping in mind that such pieces were made to be deposited in tombs scholars think that the oversized genitals may represent the person's wish to be sexually potent in the afterlife. Also, this is strong symbolism for fertility, of course! Much of ancient Egyptian myth revolves around birth, death, and resurrection, the central story involves the god Osiris, who impregnated his wife, Isis, after he was dead, thus creating an heir, after the fact. And I can guess that the idea of fertility on all levels must have been so central to their culture, the crops, the livestock, the continuity of the royal line.
Just the other day, I saw some graffiti of a giant phallus (shall we say) in a subway station. Some things are universal!
I know in Pompeii they were placed everywhere as a symbol of good luck. (Not to lead you to a brothel, which is a common misconception). The idea is that a phallus makes you laugh, which wards off bad luck!
I like that idea, I guess. I might not put it into practice in my own home, though!
Is this sculpture broken or was this how the artist wanted the hand at the top to look? What does the hand mean?
It's meant to be that way! Rodin deliberately made many of his works to look rough and unfinished. He believed it gave his works a greater emotional impact as if you could feel the sculpture emerging from the raw material. It also differentiated his sculpture from the highly finished academic work of his contemporaries. “The artist must create a spark before he can make a fire and before art is born, the artist must ready to be consumed by the fire of his own creation,” Rodin said. As for the hand, this is part of the story of Orpheus. Orpheus was an amazingly gifted musician and singer. You might see that he's holding his lyre, a stringed instrument.
When his wife Eurydice died, he went down to the underworld and convinced the gods of the underworld by playing and singing for them to release her and send her back to the living world. But he had to promise not to look back as he and Eurydice went back up to the land of the living. He forgot, and looked back to check on Eurydice, thus losing her to the underworld again, permanently. That hand is all we see of Eurydice here.
What was Picasso thinking with this one?
That's a good question. You may already know, that Picasso was a pioneer of Cubism, a movement that was focused on distortion of perspective and reorganizing space and the components of the human figure.
The colors in this particular painting are influenced by the bleakness of World War II Europe. If you look carefully at the face, you can pick out all the normal features, 2 eyes, nose, mouth, and ear, but their arrangement is distorted to present multiple viewpoints at once. Picasso was interested in showing more than what you can get from a photograph or traditional 2-dimensional image.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (The Norm restaurant and bar; BKM Café and Bowl)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is this?
This work by Salvatore Albano depicts "The Fallen Angels" who, according to the Bible, were the angels who rebelled against God along with Lucifer, who became the Devil.
I see, thanks, now I can relate to this work.
You're welcome! Are you familiar with that Biblical story, is that what made it easier to relate to?
Yes, I am. Is that main one Lucifer?
Well it's possible the main figure, whom you sent the photo of, could be Lucifer himself, but that is just speculation. He does look very angry and determined though, I think.
Beautiful work, truly inspired.
I agree, I also love the contrast between the white marble of the sculpture and the dark stone of the base.
Yes! 
I love this serene, beautiful outdoor scene by Theodore Robinson! What drew you to this work?
The way it's painted and how gentle it is in the colors and the woman's expression. Also the fact that I don't know anything about the painter.
Theodore Robinson is considered one of the first American Impressionists, a movement that began in, and is largely associated with, France. William Merritt Chase and Childe Hassam, two artists whom we have on view on the 5th floor, are also considered American Impressionists.
The Impressionists were concerned with capturing fleeting moments resulting in often quickly painted works with visible, varying brushstrokes. There is another work by Robinson on that same wall as well as 2 works by Monet, a noted French Impressionist! Robinson even went to France to study with the French Impressionists and became close friends with Monet.
Loved the Monet paintings! Absolutely beautiful.
I agree, seeing Monet is always a treat! I especially love the reflection on the water in "The Doge's Palace," the colors are so vibrant.
Yes! One of my favorites! Was it always here? I feel like I've seen it somewhere else? Do you have any info on it?
Monet is famous for creating many versions of the "same" painting. Because the Impressionists were interested in light and capturing the effects, he would often sit at the same site for a long period of time, painting different canvases of the same thing at different times of the day to see the changing light effects. There is a painting at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in Manhattan that looks similar to this, yes! I do believe our version has also been on view for some time, so it's possible you've seen it here before as well.
I probably saw the one at The Met. I am from Brazil so this is my first time here.
Oh, well, welcome to Brooklyn! Yes, you may have seen the Met's version. Although, I think it is easy to confuse various paintings by Monet because the subject matter, colors, and style can be so similar.
That's true, thanks!
Of course!
Could you give me some information?
The subject of this painting is the sister-in-law of a friend of the artist, Henri Fantin-Latour. She was the wife of a businessman Leon Maitre. Fantin-Latour painted her three times. LaTour prefered painting quiet scenes of men and women he knew well. Like Madame Maitre, they often seem absorbed in their own interior world, a new development in society portraiture.
Surprisingly, considering how beautiful and mysterious this portrait is, the artist is best known for paintings of flowers and group portraits, not portraits of a single subject.
Is Mary supposed to be topless and this was censored?
I'm glad to see you're looking so closely at Maso di Banco's triptych. Mary is not meant to be topless, it appears as though her shirt is a sort of coral or salmon color, and the typical blue robe she is often seen wearing is draped around her. On occasion she is presented breast feeding (Madonna Lactans) the Christ Child which was seen as a sign of her compassion and does not seem to have caused offense.
This left-hand panel is separated into three 'scenes' in a vertical manner: the top scene shows the Annunciation, when the angel Gabriel came to tell Mary she would conceive Jesus. The middle scene shows the shepherds, who were told about the coming of Jesus by angels, and who visited Jesus, Mary and Joseph after Jesus' birth. And the bottom scene, that you sent a photo of, is a nativity scene. Jesus is in the manger, the Virgin Mary is relaxed next to the baby, and Joseph sits at the front, all three figures have halos above their heads. This way of showing a story in various scenes on top of each other is called a 'stacked composition' and was popular to help tell stories.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this?
This statue dates to a period when the Persian Empire controlled Egypt which explains the man's unusual clothing and jewelry. The high skirt tied at the chest is distinctly Persian as is the necklace, called a "torque," featuring ibexes. Despite the Persian garments, this man still wears an Egyptian-style wig and had Egyptian-style features.
I'd like to know what this is.
Simply put, this is a chair. The Ancient Egyptians invented chairs like this in the 2nd Dynasty and you can see similar seating depicted in some of the reliefs in the gallery. Animal feet--in this case lion--were popular on Ancient Egyptian chairs and the protrusions below the feet were designed to secure the chair in sockets.
Hi! That is the "Century Vase," made for the United States Centennial anniversary in 1876.
I bet you spotted the silhouette of George Washington already! If you keep looking, you will see many scenes from American history and images of American innovations including the sewing machine and telegraph poles! This work was meant to be publicly displayed and to act as a sort of advertisement for America's past, present, and future at that 100-year mark.
It was shown in Philadelphia in 1876, in a big exhibition that was open to the public to mark the Centennial. It had buildings and booths dedicated to various industries and trades, to art, etc. It was the first World's Fair held in the United States!
That's awesome! Super cool!
I agree! It was a major attraction. It took 10 years to plan, and it was held in the area that is present-day Fairmount Park.
How did the Brooklyn museum acquire it?
It was a gift from the descendants of the man who founded Union Porcelain Works, the Brooklyn-based company that made it.
In the erotic art from Ptolemaic Egypt, why are the proportions of the genitals so unrealistic?
Keeping in mind that such pieces were made to be deposited in tombs scholars think that the oversized genitals may represent the person's wish to be sexually potent in the afterlife. Also, this is strong symbolism for fertility, of course! Much of ancient Egyptian myth revolves around birth, death, and resurrection, the central story involves the god Osiris, who impregnated his wife, Isis, after he was dead, thus creating an heir, after the fact. And I can guess that the idea of fertility on all levels must have been so central to their culture, the crops, the livestock, the continuity of the royal line.
Just the other day, I saw some graffiti of a giant phallus (shall we say) in a subway station. Some things are universal!
I know in Pompeii they were placed everywhere as a symbol of good luck. (Not to lead you to a brothel, which is a common misconception). The idea is that a phallus makes you laugh, which wards off bad luck!
I like that idea, I guess. I might not put it into practice in my own home, though!
Is this sculpture broken or was this how the artist wanted the hand at the top to look? What does the hand mean?
It's meant to be that way! Rodin deliberately made many of his works to look rough and unfinished. He believed it gave his works a greater emotional impact as if you could feel the sculpture emerging from the raw material. It also differentiated his sculpture from the highly finished academic work of his contemporaries. “The artist must create a spark before he can make a fire and before art is born, the artist must ready to be consumed by the fire of his own creation,” Rodin said. As for the hand, this is part of the story of Orpheus. Orpheus was an amazingly gifted musician and singer. You might see that he's holding his lyre, a stringed instrument.
When his wife Eurydice died, he went down to the underworld and convinced the gods of the underworld by playing and singing for them to release her and send her back to the living world. But he had to promise not to look back as he and Eurydice went back up to the land of the living. He forgot, and looked back to check on Eurydice, thus losing her to the underworld again, permanently. That hand is all we see of Eurydice here.
What was Picasso thinking with this one?
That's a good question. You may already know, that Picasso was a pioneer of Cubism, a movement that was focused on distortion of perspective and reorganizing space and the components of the human figure.
The colors in this particular painting are influenced by the bleakness of World War II Europe. If you look carefully at the face, you can pick out all the normal features, 2 eyes, nose, mouth, and ear, but their arrangement is distorted to present multiple viewpoints at once. Picasso was interested in showing more than what you can get from a photograph or traditional 2-dimensional image.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is this?
This work by Salvatore Albano depicts "The Fallen Angels" who, according to the Bible, were the angels who rebelled against God along with Lucifer, who became the Devil.
I see, thanks, now I can relate to this work.
You're welcome! Are you familiar with that Biblical story, is that what made it easier to relate to?
Yes, I am. Is that main one Lucifer?
Well it's possible the main figure, whom you sent the photo of, could be Lucifer himself, but that is just speculation. He does look very angry and determined though, I think.
Beautiful work, truly inspired.
I agree, I also love the contrast between the white marble of the sculpture and the dark stone of the base.
Yes! 
I love this serene, beautiful outdoor scene by Theodore Robinson! What drew you to this work?
The way it's painted and how gentle it is in the colors and the woman's expression. Also the fact that I don't know anything about the painter.
Theodore Robinson is considered one of the first American Impressionists, a movement that began in, and is largely associated with, France. William Merritt Chase and Childe Hassam, two artists whom we have on view on the 5th floor, are also considered American Impressionists.
The Impressionists were concerned with capturing fleeting moments resulting in often quickly painted works with visible, varying brushstrokes. There is another work by Robinson on that same wall as well as 2 works by Monet, a noted French Impressionist! Robinson even went to France to study with the French Impressionists and became close friends with Monet.
Loved the Monet paintings! Absolutely beautiful.
I agree, seeing Monet is always a treat! I especially love the reflection on the water in "The Doge's Palace," the colors are so vibrant.
Yes! One of my favorites! Was it always here? I feel like I've seen it somewhere else? Do you have any info on it?
Monet is famous for creating many versions of the "same" painting. Because the Impressionists were interested in light and capturing the effects, he would often sit at the same site for a long period of time, painting different canvases of the same thing at different times of the day to see the changing light effects. There is a painting at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in Manhattan that looks similar to this, yes! I do believe our version has also been on view for some time, so it's possible you've seen it here before as well.
I probably saw the one at The Met. I am from Brazil so this is my first time here.
Oh, well, welcome to Brooklyn! Yes, you may have seen the Met's version. Although, I think it is easy to confuse various paintings by Monet because the subject matter, colors, and style can be so similar.
That's true, thanks!
Of course!
Could you give me some information?
The subject of this painting is the sister-in-law of a friend of the artist, Henri Fantin-Latour. She was the wife of a businessman Leon Maitre. Fantin-Latour painted her three times. LaTour prefered painting quiet scenes of men and women he knew well. Like Madame Maitre, they often seem absorbed in their own interior world, a new development in society portraiture.
Surprisingly, considering how beautiful and mysterious this portrait is, the artist is best known for paintings of flowers and group portraits, not portraits of a single subject.
Is Mary supposed to be topless and this was censored?
I'm glad to see you're looking so closely at Maso di Banco's triptych. Mary is not meant to be topless, it appears as though her shirt is a sort of coral or salmon color, and the typical blue robe she is often seen wearing is draped around her. On occasion she is presented breast feeding (Madonna Lactans) the Christ Child which was seen as a sign of her compassion and does not seem to have caused offense.
This left-hand panel is separated into three 'scenes' in a vertical manner: the top scene shows the Annunciation, when the angel Gabriel came to tell Mary she would conceive Jesus. The middle scene shows the shepherds, who were told about the coming of Jesus by angels, and who visited Jesus, Mary and Joseph after Jesus' birth. And the bottom scene, that you sent a photo of, is a nativity scene. Jesus is in the manger, the Virgin Mary is relaxed next to the baby, and Joseph sits at the front, all three figures have halos above their heads. This way of showing a story in various scenes on top of each other is called a 'stacked composition' and was popular to help tell stories.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this?
This statue dates to a period when the Persian Empire controlled Egypt which explains the man's unusual clothing and jewelry. The high skirt tied at the chest is distinctly Persian as is the necklace, called a "torque," featuring ibexes. Despite the Persian garments, this man still wears an Egyptian-style wig and had Egyptian-style features.
I'd like to know what this is.
Simply put, this is a chair. The Ancient Egyptians invented chairs like this in the 2nd Dynasty and you can see similar seating depicted in some of the reliefs in the gallery. Animal feet--in this case lion--were popular on Ancient Egyptian chairs and the protrusions below the feet were designed to secure the chair in sockets.
Hi! That is the "Century Vase," made for the United States Centennial anniversary in 1876.
I bet you spotted the silhouette of George Washington already! If you keep looking, you will see many scenes from American history and images of American innovations including the sewing machine and telegraph poles! This work was meant to be publicly displayed and to act as a sort of advertisement for America's past, present, and future at that 100-year mark.
It was shown in Philadelphia in 1876, in a big exhibition that was open to the public to mark the Centennial. It had buildings and booths dedicated to various industries and trades, to art, etc. It was the first World's Fair held in the United States!
That's awesome! Super cool!
I agree! It was a major attraction. It took 10 years to plan, and it was held in the area that is present-day Fairmount Park.
How did the Brooklyn museum acquire it?
It was a gift from the descendants of the man who founded Union Porcelain Works, the Brooklyn-based company that made it.
In the erotic art from Ptolemaic Egypt, why are the proportions of the genitals so unrealistic?
Keeping in mind that such pieces were made to be deposited in tombs scholars think that the oversized genitals may represent the person's wish to be sexually potent in the afterlife. Also, this is strong symbolism for fertility, of course! Much of ancient Egyptian myth revolves around birth, death, and resurrection, the central story involves the god Osiris, who impregnated his wife, Isis, after he was dead, thus creating an heir, after the fact. And I can guess that the idea of fertility on all levels must have been so central to their culture, the crops, the livestock, the continuity of the royal line.
Just the other day, I saw some graffiti of a giant phallus (shall we say) in a subway station. Some things are universal!
I know in Pompeii they were placed everywhere as a symbol of good luck. (Not to lead you to a brothel, which is a common misconception). The idea is that a phallus makes you laugh, which wards off bad luck!
I like that idea, I guess. I might not put it into practice in my own home, though!
Is this sculpture broken or was this how the artist wanted the hand at the top to look? What does the hand mean?
It's meant to be that way! Rodin deliberately made many of his works to look rough and unfinished. He believed it gave his works a greater emotional impact as if you could feel the sculpture emerging from the raw material. It also differentiated his sculpture from the highly finished academic work of his contemporaries. “The artist must create a spark before he can make a fire and before art is born, the artist must ready to be consumed by the fire of his own creation,” Rodin said. As for the hand, this is part of the story of Orpheus. Orpheus was an amazingly gifted musician and singer. You might see that he's holding his lyre, a stringed instrument.
When his wife Eurydice died, he went down to the underworld and convinced the gods of the underworld by playing and singing for them to release her and send her back to the living world. But he had to promise not to look back as he and Eurydice went back up to the land of the living. He forgot, and looked back to check on Eurydice, thus losing her to the underworld again, permanently. That hand is all we see of Eurydice here.
What was Picasso thinking with this one?
That's a good question. You may already know, that Picasso was a pioneer of Cubism, a movement that was focused on distortion of perspective and reorganizing space and the components of the human figure.
The colors in this particular painting are influenced by the bleakness of World War II Europe. If you look carefully at the face, you can pick out all the normal features, 2 eyes, nose, mouth, and ear, but their arrangement is distorted to present multiple viewpoints at once. Picasso was interested in showing more than what you can get from a photograph or traditional 2-dimensional image.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is this?
This work by Salvatore Albano depicts "The Fallen Angels" who, according to the Bible, were the angels who rebelled against God along with Lucifer, who became the Devil.
I see, thanks, now I can relate to this work.
You're welcome! Are you familiar with that Biblical story, is that what made it easier to relate to?
Yes, I am. Is that main one Lucifer?
Well it's possible the main figure, whom you sent the photo of, could be Lucifer himself, but that is just speculation. He does look very angry and determined though, I think.
Beautiful work, truly inspired.
I agree, I also love the contrast between the white marble of the sculpture and the dark stone of the base.
Yes! 
I love this serene, beautiful outdoor scene by Theodore Robinson! What drew you to this work?
The way it's painted and how gentle it is in the colors and the woman's expression. Also the fact that I don't know anything about the painter.
Theodore Robinson is considered one of the first American Impressionists, a movement that began in, and is largely associated with, France. William Merritt Chase and Childe Hassam, two artists whom we have on view on the 5th floor, are also considered American Impressionists.
The Impressionists were concerned with capturing fleeting moments resulting in often quickly painted works with visible, varying brushstrokes. There is another work by Robinson on that same wall as well as 2 works by Monet, a noted French Impressionist! Robinson even went to France to study with the French Impressionists and became close friends with Monet.
Loved the Monet paintings! Absolutely beautiful.
I agree, seeing Monet is always a treat! I especially love the reflection on the water in "The Doge's Palace," the colors are so vibrant.
Yes! One of my favorites! Was it always here? I feel like I've seen it somewhere else? Do you have any info on it?
Monet is famous for creating many versions of the "same" painting. Because the Impressionists were interested in light and capturing the effects, he would often sit at the same site for a long period of time, painting different canvases of the same thing at different times of the day to see the changing light effects. There is a painting at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in Manhattan that looks similar to this, yes! I do believe our version has also been on view for some time, so it's possible you've seen it here before as well.
I probably saw the one at The Met. I am from Brazil so this is my first time here.
Oh, well, welcome to Brooklyn! Yes, you may have seen the Met's version. Although, I think it is easy to confuse various paintings by Monet because the subject matter, colors, and style can be so similar.
That's true, thanks!
Of course!
Could you give me some information?
The subject of this painting is the sister-in-law of a friend of the artist, Henri Fantin-Latour. She was the wife of a businessman Leon Maitre. Fantin-Latour painted her three times. LaTour prefered painting quiet scenes of men and women he knew well. Like Madame Maitre, they often seem absorbed in their own interior world, a new development in society portraiture.
Surprisingly, considering how beautiful and mysterious this portrait is, the artist is best known for paintings of flowers and group portraits, not portraits of a single subject.
Is Mary supposed to be topless and this was censored?
I'm glad to see you're looking so closely at Maso di Banco's triptych. Mary is not meant to be topless, it appears as though her shirt is a sort of coral or salmon color, and the typical blue robe she is often seen wearing is draped around her. On occasion she is presented breast feeding (Madonna Lactans) the Christ Child which was seen as a sign of her compassion and does not seem to have caused offense.
This left-hand panel is separated into three 'scenes' in a vertical manner: the top scene shows the Annunciation, when the angel Gabriel came to tell Mary she would conceive Jesus. The middle scene shows the shepherds, who were told about the coming of Jesus by angels, and who visited Jesus, Mary and Joseph after Jesus' birth. And the bottom scene, that you sent a photo of, is a nativity scene. Jesus is in the manger, the Virgin Mary is relaxed next to the baby, and Joseph sits at the front, all three figures have halos above their heads. This way of showing a story in various scenes on top of each other is called a 'stacked composition' and was popular to help tell stories.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this?
This statue dates to a period when the Persian Empire controlled Egypt which explains the man's unusual clothing and jewelry. The high skirt tied at the chest is distinctly Persian as is the necklace, called a "torque," featuring ibexes. Despite the Persian garments, this man still wears an Egyptian-style wig and had Egyptian-style features.
I'd like to know what this is.
Simply put, this is a chair. The Ancient Egyptians invented chairs like this in the 2nd Dynasty and you can see similar seating depicted in some of the reliefs in the gallery. Animal feet--in this case lion--were popular on Ancient Egyptian chairs and the protrusions below the feet were designed to secure the chair in sockets.
Hi! That is the "Century Vase," made for the United States Centennial anniversary in 1876.
I bet you spotted the silhouette of George Washington already! If you keep looking, you will see many scenes from American history and images of American innovations including the sewing machine and telegraph poles! This work was meant to be publicly displayed and to act as a sort of advertisement for America's past, present, and future at that 100-year mark.
It was shown in Philadelphia in 1876, in a big exhibition that was open to the public to mark the Centennial. It had buildings and booths dedicated to various industries and trades, to art, etc. It was the first World's Fair held in the United States!
That's awesome! Super cool!
I agree! It was a major attraction. It took 10 years to plan, and it was held in the area that is present-day Fairmount Park.
How did the Brooklyn museum acquire it?
It was a gift from the descendants of the man who founded Union Porcelain Works, the Brooklyn-based company that made it.
In the erotic art from Ptolemaic Egypt, why are the proportions of the genitals so unrealistic?
Keeping in mind that such pieces were made to be deposited in tombs scholars think that the oversized genitals may represent the person's wish to be sexually potent in the afterlife. Also, this is strong symbolism for fertility, of course! Much of ancient Egyptian myth revolves around birth, death, and resurrection, the central story involves the god Osiris, who impregnated his wife, Isis, after he was dead, thus creating an heir, after the fact. And I can guess that the idea of fertility on all levels must have been so central to their culture, the crops, the livestock, the continuity of the royal line.
Just the other day, I saw some graffiti of a giant phallus (shall we say) in a subway station. Some things are universal!
I know in Pompeii they were placed everywhere as a symbol of good luck. (Not to lead you to a brothel, which is a common misconception). The idea is that a phallus makes you laugh, which wards off bad luck!
I like that idea, I guess. I might not put it into practice in my own home, though!
Is this sculpture broken or was this how the artist wanted the hand at the top to look? What does the hand mean?
It's meant to be that way! Rodin deliberately made many of his works to look rough and unfinished. He believed it gave his works a greater emotional impact as if you could feel the sculpture emerging from the raw material. It also differentiated his sculpture from the highly finished academic work of his contemporaries. “The artist must create a spark before he can make a fire and before art is born, the artist must ready to be consumed by the fire of his own creation,” Rodin said. As for the hand, this is part of the story of Orpheus. Orpheus was an amazingly gifted musician and singer. You might see that he's holding his lyre, a stringed instrument.
When his wife Eurydice died, he went down to the underworld and convinced the gods of the underworld by playing and singing for them to release her and send her back to the living world. But he had to promise not to look back as he and Eurydice went back up to the land of the living. He forgot, and looked back to check on Eurydice, thus losing her to the underworld again, permanently. That hand is all we see of Eurydice here.
What was Picasso thinking with this one?
That's a good question. You may already know, that Picasso was a pioneer of Cubism, a movement that was focused on distortion of perspective and reorganizing space and the components of the human figure.
The colors in this particular painting are influenced by the bleakness of World War II Europe. If you look carefully at the face, you can pick out all the normal features, 2 eyes, nose, mouth, and ear, but their arrangement is distorted to present multiple viewpoints at once. Picasso was interested in showing more than what you can get from a photograph or traditional 2-dimensional image.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is this?
This work by Salvatore Albano depicts "The Fallen Angels" who, according to the Bible, were the angels who rebelled against God along with Lucifer, who became the Devil.
I see, thanks, now I can relate to this work.
You're welcome! Are you familiar with that Biblical story, is that what made it easier to relate to?
Yes, I am. Is that main one Lucifer?
Well it's possible the main figure, whom you sent the photo of, could be Lucifer himself, but that is just speculation. He does look very angry and determined though, I think.
Beautiful work, truly inspired.
I agree, I also love the contrast between the white marble of the sculpture and the dark stone of the base.
Yes! 
I love this serene, beautiful outdoor scene by Theodore Robinson! What drew you to this work?
The way it's painted and how gentle it is in the colors and the woman's expression. Also the fact that I don't know anything about the painter.
Theodore Robinson is considered one of the first American Impressionists, a movement that began in, and is largely associated with, France. William Merritt Chase and Childe Hassam, two artists whom we have on view on the 5th floor, are also considered American Impressionists.
The Impressionists were concerned with capturing fleeting moments resulting in often quickly painted works with visible, varying brushstrokes. There is another work by Robinson on that same wall as well as 2 works by Monet, a noted French Impressionist! Robinson even went to France to study with the French Impressionists and became close friends with Monet.
Loved the Monet paintings! Absolutely beautiful.
I agree, seeing Monet is always a treat! I especially love the reflection on the water in "The Doge's Palace," the colors are so vibrant.
Yes! One of my favorites! Was it always here? I feel like I've seen it somewhere else? Do you have any info on it?
Monet is famous for creating many versions of the "same" painting. Because the Impressionists were interested in light and capturing the effects, he would often sit at the same site for a long period of time, painting different canvases of the same thing at different times of the day to see the changing light effects. There is a painting at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in Manhattan that looks similar to this, yes! I do believe our version has also been on view for some time, so it's possible you've seen it here before as well.
I probably saw the one at The Met. I am from Brazil so this is my first time here.
Oh, well, welcome to Brooklyn! Yes, you may have seen the Met's version. Although, I think it is easy to confuse various paintings by Monet because the subject matter, colors, and style can be so similar.
That's true, thanks!
Of course!
Could you give me some information?
The subject of this painting is the sister-in-law of a friend of the artist, Henri Fantin-Latour. She was the wife of a businessman Leon Maitre. Fantin-Latour painted her three times. LaTour prefered painting quiet scenes of men and women he knew well. Like Madame Maitre, they often seem absorbed in their own interior world, a new development in society portraiture.
Surprisingly, considering how beautiful and mysterious this portrait is, the artist is best known for paintings of flowers and group portraits, not portraits of a single subject.
Is Mary supposed to be topless and this was censored?
I'm glad to see you're looking so closely at Maso di Banco's triptych. Mary is not meant to be topless, it appears as though her shirt is a sort of coral or salmon color, and the typical blue robe she is often seen wearing is draped around her. On occasion she is presented breast feeding (Madonna Lactans) the Christ Child which was seen as a sign of her compassion and does not seem to have caused offense.
This left-hand panel is separated into three 'scenes' in a vertical manner: the top scene shows the Annunciation, when the angel Gabriel came to tell Mary she would conceive Jesus. The middle scene shows the shepherds, who were told about the coming of Jesus by angels, and who visited Jesus, Mary and Joseph after Jesus' birth. And the bottom scene, that you sent a photo of, is a nativity scene. Jesus is in the manger, the Virgin Mary is relaxed next to the baby, and Joseph sits at the front, all three figures have halos above their heads. This way of showing a story in various scenes on top of each other is called a 'stacked composition' and was popular to help tell stories.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this?
This statue dates to a period when the Persian Empire controlled Egypt which explains the man's unusual clothing and jewelry. The high skirt tied at the chest is distinctly Persian as is the necklace, called a "torque," featuring ibexes. Despite the Persian garments, this man still wears an Egyptian-style wig and had Egyptian-style features.
I'd like to know what this is.
Simply put, this is a chair. The Ancient Egyptians invented chairs like this in the 2nd Dynasty and you can see similar seating depicted in some of the reliefs in the gallery. Animal feet--in this case lion--were popular on Ancient Egyptian chairs and the protrusions below the feet were designed to secure the chair in sockets.
Hi! That is the "Century Vase," made for the United States Centennial anniversary in 1876.
I bet you spotted the silhouette of George Washington already! If you keep looking, you will see many scenes from American history and images of American innovations including the sewing machine and telegraph poles! This work was meant to be publicly displayed and to act as a sort of advertisement for America's past, present, and future at that 100-year mark.
It was shown in Philadelphia in 1876, in a big exhibition that was open to the public to mark the Centennial. It had buildings and booths dedicated to various industries and trades, to art, etc. It was the first World's Fair held in the United States!
That's awesome! Super cool!
I agree! It was a major attraction. It took 10 years to plan, and it was held in the area that is present-day Fairmount Park.
How did the Brooklyn museum acquire it?
It was a gift from the descendants of the man who founded Union Porcelain Works, the Brooklyn-based company that made it.
In the erotic art from Ptolemaic Egypt, why are the proportions of the genitals so unrealistic?
Keeping in mind that such pieces were made to be deposited in tombs scholars think that the oversized genitals may represent the person's wish to be sexually potent in the afterlife. Also, this is strong symbolism for fertility, of course! Much of ancient Egyptian myth revolves around birth, death, and resurrection, the central story involves the god Osiris, who impregnated his wife, Isis, after he was dead, thus creating an heir, after the fact. And I can guess that the idea of fertility on all levels must have been so central to their culture, the crops, the livestock, the continuity of the royal line.
Just the other day, I saw some graffiti of a giant phallus (shall we say) in a subway station. Some things are universal!
I know in Pompeii they were placed everywhere as a symbol of good luck. (Not to lead you to a brothel, which is a common misconception). The idea is that a phallus makes you laugh, which wards off bad luck!
I like that idea, I guess. I might not put it into practice in my own home, though!
Is this sculpture broken or was this how the artist wanted the hand at the top to look? What does the hand mean?
It's meant to be that way! Rodin deliberately made many of his works to look rough and unfinished. He believed it gave his works a greater emotional impact as if you could feel the sculpture emerging from the raw material. It also differentiated his sculpture from the highly finished academic work of his contemporaries. “The artist must create a spark before he can make a fire and before art is born, the artist must ready to be consumed by the fire of his own creation,” Rodin said. As for the hand, this is part of the story of Orpheus. Orpheus was an amazingly gifted musician and singer. You might see that he's holding his lyre, a stringed instrument.
When his wife Eurydice died, he went down to the underworld and convinced the gods of the underworld by playing and singing for them to release her and send her back to the living world. But he had to promise not to look back as he and Eurydice went back up to the land of the living. He forgot, and looked back to check on Eurydice, thus losing her to the underworld again, permanently. That hand is all we see of Eurydice here.
What was Picasso thinking with this one?
That's a good question. You may already know, that Picasso was a pioneer of Cubism, a movement that was focused on distortion of perspective and reorganizing space and the components of the human figure.
The colors in this particular painting are influenced by the bleakness of World War II Europe. If you look carefully at the face, you can pick out all the normal features, 2 eyes, nose, mouth, and ear, but their arrangement is distorted to present multiple viewpoints at once. Picasso was interested in showing more than what you can get from a photograph or traditional 2-dimensional image.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is this?
This work by Salvatore Albano depicts "The Fallen Angels" who, according to the Bible, were the angels who rebelled against God along with Lucifer, who became the Devil.
I see, thanks, now I can relate to this work.
You're welcome! Are you familiar with that Biblical story, is that what made it easier to relate to?
Yes, I am. Is that main one Lucifer?
Well it's possible the main figure, whom you sent the photo of, could be Lucifer himself, but that is just speculation. He does look very angry and determined though, I think.
Beautiful work, truly inspired.
I agree, I also love the contrast between the white marble of the sculpture and the dark stone of the base.
Yes! 
I love this serene, beautiful outdoor scene by Theodore Robinson! What drew you to this work?
The way it's painted and how gentle it is in the colors and the woman's expression. Also the fact that I don't know anything about the painter.
Theodore Robinson is considered one of the first American Impressionists, a movement that began in, and is largely associated with, France. William Merritt Chase and Childe Hassam, two artists whom we have on view on the 5th floor, are also considered American Impressionists.
The Impressionists were concerned with capturing fleeting moments resulting in often quickly painted works with visible, varying brushstrokes. There is another work by Robinson on that same wall as well as 2 works by Monet, a noted French Impressionist! Robinson even went to France to study with the French Impressionists and became close friends with Monet.
Loved the Monet paintings! Absolutely beautiful.
I agree, seeing Monet is always a treat! I especially love the reflection on the water in "The Doge's Palace," the colors are so vibrant.
Yes! One of my favorites! Was it always here? I feel like I've seen it somewhere else? Do you have any info on it?
Monet is famous for creating many versions of the "same" painting. Because the Impressionists were interested in light and capturing the effects, he would often sit at the same site for a long period of time, painting different canvases of the same thing at different times of the day to see the changing light effects. There is a painting at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in Manhattan that looks similar to this, yes! I do believe our version has also been on view for some time, so it's possible you've seen it here before as well.
I probably saw the one at The Met. I am from Brazil so this is my first time here.
Oh, well, welcome to Brooklyn! Yes, you may have seen the Met's version. Although, I think it is easy to confuse various paintings by Monet because the subject matter, colors, and style can be so similar.
That's true, thanks!
Of course!
Could you give me some information?
The subject of this painting is the sister-in-law of a friend of the artist, Henri Fantin-Latour. She was the wife of a businessman Leon Maitre. Fantin-Latour painted her three times. LaTour prefered painting quiet scenes of men and women he knew well. Like Madame Maitre, they often seem absorbed in their own interior world, a new development in society portraiture.
Surprisingly, considering how beautiful and mysterious this portrait is, the artist is best known for paintings of flowers and group portraits, not portraits of a single subject.
Is Mary supposed to be topless and this was censored?
I'm glad to see you're looking so closely at Maso di Banco's triptych. Mary is not meant to be topless, it appears as though her shirt is a sort of coral or salmon color, and the typical blue robe she is often seen wearing is draped around her. On occasion she is presented breast feeding (Madonna Lactans) the Christ Child which was seen as a sign of her compassion and does not seem to have caused offense.
This left-hand panel is separated into three 'scenes' in a vertical manner: the top scene shows the Annunciation, when the angel Gabriel came to tell Mary she would conceive Jesus. The middle scene shows the shepherds, who were told about the coming of Jesus by angels, and who visited Jesus, Mary and Joseph after Jesus' birth. And the bottom scene, that you sent a photo of, is a nativity scene. Jesus is in the manger, the Virgin Mary is relaxed next to the baby, and Joseph sits at the front, all three figures have halos above their heads. This way of showing a story in various scenes on top of each other is called a 'stacked composition' and was popular to help tell stories.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this?
This statue dates to a period when the Persian Empire controlled Egypt which explains the man's unusual clothing and jewelry. The high skirt tied at the chest is distinctly Persian as is the necklace, called a "torque," featuring ibexes. Despite the Persian garments, this man still wears an Egyptian-style wig and had Egyptian-style features.
I'd like to know what this is.
Simply put, this is a chair. The Ancient Egyptians invented chairs like this in the 2nd Dynasty and you can see similar seating depicted in some of the reliefs in the gallery. Animal feet--in this case lion--were popular on Ancient Egyptian chairs and the protrusions below the feet were designed to secure the chair in sockets.
Hi! That is the "Century Vase," made for the United States Centennial anniversary in 1876.
I bet you spotted the silhouette of George Washington already! If you keep looking, you will see many scenes from American history and images of American innovations including the sewing machine and telegraph poles! This work was meant to be publicly displayed and to act as a sort of advertisement for America's past, present, and future at that 100-year mark.
It was shown in Philadelphia in 1876, in a big exhibition that was open to the public to mark the Centennial. It had buildings and booths dedicated to various industries and trades, to art, etc. It was the first World's Fair held in the United States!
That's awesome! Super cool!
I agree! It was a major attraction. It took 10 years to plan, and it was held in the area that is present-day Fairmount Park.
How did the Brooklyn museum acquire it?
It was a gift from the descendants of the man who founded Union Porcelain Works, the Brooklyn-based company that made it.
In the erotic art from Ptolemaic Egypt, why are the proportions of the genitals so unrealistic?
Keeping in mind that such pieces were made to be deposited in tombs scholars think that the oversized genitals may represent the person's wish to be sexually potent in the afterlife. Also, this is strong symbolism for fertility, of course! Much of ancient Egyptian myth revolves around birth, death, and resurrection, the central story involves the god Osiris, who impregnated his wife, Isis, after he was dead, thus creating an heir, after the fact. And I can guess that the idea of fertility on all levels must have been so central to their culture, the crops, the livestock, the continuity of the royal line.
Just the other day, I saw some graffiti of a giant phallus (shall we say) in a subway station. Some things are universal!
I know in Pompeii they were placed everywhere as a symbol of good luck. (Not to lead you to a brothel, which is a common misconception). The idea is that a phallus makes you laugh, which wards off bad luck!
I like that idea, I guess. I might not put it into practice in my own home, though!
Is this sculpture broken or was this how the artist wanted the hand at the top to look? What does the hand mean?
It's meant to be that way! Rodin deliberately made many of his works to look rough and unfinished. He believed it gave his works a greater emotional impact as if you could feel the sculpture emerging from the raw material. It also differentiated his sculpture from the highly finished academic work of his contemporaries. “The artist must create a spark before he can make a fire and before art is born, the artist must ready to be consumed by the fire of his own creation,” Rodin said. As for the hand, this is part of the story of Orpheus. Orpheus was an amazingly gifted musician and singer. You might see that he's holding his lyre, a stringed instrument.
When his wife Eurydice died, he went down to the underworld and convinced the gods of the underworld by playing and singing for them to release her and send her back to the living world. But he had to promise not to look back as he and Eurydice went back up to the land of the living. He forgot, and looked back to check on Eurydice, thus losing her to the underworld again, permanently. That hand is all we see of Eurydice here.
What was Picasso thinking with this one?
That's a good question. You may already know, that Picasso was a pioneer of Cubism, a movement that was focused on distortion of perspective and reorganizing space and the components of the human figure.
The colors in this particular painting are influenced by the bleakness of World War II Europe. If you look carefully at the face, you can pick out all the normal features, 2 eyes, nose, mouth, and ear, but their arrangement is distorted to present multiple viewpoints at once. Picasso was interested in showing more than what you can get from a photograph or traditional 2-dimensional image.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is this?
This work by Salvatore Albano depicts "The Fallen Angels" who, according to the Bible, were the angels who rebelled against God along with Lucifer, who became the Devil.
I see, thanks, now I can relate to this work.
You're welcome! Are you familiar with that Biblical story, is that what made it easier to relate to?
Yes, I am. Is that main one Lucifer?
Well it's possible the main figure, whom you sent the photo of, could be Lucifer himself, but that is just speculation. He does look very angry and determined though, I think.
Beautiful work, truly inspired.
I agree, I also love the contrast between the white marble of the sculpture and the dark stone of the base.
Yes! 
I love this serene, beautiful outdoor scene by Theodore Robinson! What drew you to this work?
The way it's painted and how gentle it is in the colors and the woman's expression. Also the fact that I don't know anything about the painter.
Theodore Robinson is considered one of the first American Impressionists, a movement that began in, and is largely associated with, France. William Merritt Chase and Childe Hassam, two artists whom we have on view on the 5th floor, are also considered American Impressionists.
The Impressionists were concerned with capturing fleeting moments resulting in often quickly painted works with visible, varying brushstrokes. There is another work by Robinson on that same wall as well as 2 works by Monet, a noted French Impressionist! Robinson even went to France to study with the French Impressionists and became close friends with Monet.
Loved the Monet paintings! Absolutely beautiful.
I agree, seeing Monet is always a treat! I especially love the reflection on the water in "The Doge's Palace," the colors are so vibrant.
Yes! One of my favorites! Was it always here? I feel like I've seen it somewhere else? Do you have any info on it?
Monet is famous for creating many versions of the "same" painting. Because the Impressionists were interested in light and capturing the effects, he would often sit at the same site for a long period of time, painting different canvases of the same thing at different times of the day to see the changing light effects. There is a painting at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in Manhattan that looks similar to this, yes! I do believe our version has also been on view for some time, so it's possible you've seen it here before as well.
I probably saw the one at The Met. I am from Brazil so this is my first time here.
Oh, well, welcome to Brooklyn! Yes, you may have seen the Met's version. Although, I think it is easy to confuse various paintings by Monet because the subject matter, colors, and style can be so similar.
That's true, thanks!
Of course!
Could you give me some information?
The subject of this painting is the sister-in-law of a friend of the artist, Henri Fantin-Latour. She was the wife of a businessman Leon Maitre. Fantin-Latour painted her three times. LaTour prefered painting quiet scenes of men and women he knew well. Like Madame Maitre, they often seem absorbed in their own interior world, a new development in society portraiture.
Surprisingly, considering how beautiful and mysterious this portrait is, the artist is best known for paintings of flowers and group portraits, not portraits of a single subject.
Is Mary supposed to be topless and this was censored?
I'm glad to see you're looking so closely at Maso di Banco's triptych. Mary is not meant to be topless, it appears as though her shirt is a sort of coral or salmon color, and the typical blue robe she is often seen wearing is draped around her. On occasion she is presented breast feeding (Madonna Lactans) the Christ Child which was seen as a sign of her compassion and does not seem to have caused offense.
This left-hand panel is separated into three 'scenes' in a vertical manner: the top scene shows the Annunciation, when the angel Gabriel came to tell Mary she would conceive Jesus. The middle scene shows the shepherds, who were told about the coming of Jesus by angels, and who visited Jesus, Mary and Joseph after Jesus' birth. And the bottom scene, that you sent a photo of, is a nativity scene. Jesus is in the manger, the Virgin Mary is relaxed next to the baby, and Joseph sits at the front, all three figures have halos above their heads. This way of showing a story in various scenes on top of each other is called a 'stacked composition' and was popular to help tell stories.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this?
This statue dates to a period when the Persian Empire controlled Egypt which explains the man's unusual clothing and jewelry. The high skirt tied at the chest is distinctly Persian as is the necklace, called a "torque," featuring ibexes. Despite the Persian garments, this man still wears an Egyptian-style wig and had Egyptian-style features.
I'd like to know what this is.
Simply put, this is a chair. The Ancient Egyptians invented chairs like this in the 2nd Dynasty and you can see similar seating depicted in some of the reliefs in the gallery. Animal feet--in this case lion--were popular on Ancient Egyptian chairs and the protrusions below the feet were designed to secure the chair in sockets.
Hi! That is the "Century Vase," made for the United States Centennial anniversary in 1876.
I bet you spotted the silhouette of George Washington already! If you keep looking, you will see many scenes from American history and images of American innovations including the sewing machine and telegraph poles! This work was meant to be publicly displayed and to act as a sort of advertisement for America's past, present, and future at that 100-year mark.
It was shown in Philadelphia in 1876, in a big exhibition that was open to the public to mark the Centennial. It had buildings and booths dedicated to various industries and trades, to art, etc. It was the first World's Fair held in the United States!
That's awesome! Super cool!
I agree! It was a major attraction. It took 10 years to plan, and it was held in the area that is present-day Fairmount Park.
How did the Brooklyn museum acquire it?
It was a gift from the descendants of the man who founded Union Porcelain Works, the Brooklyn-based company that made it.
In the erotic art from Ptolemaic Egypt, why are the proportions of the genitals so unrealistic?
Keeping in mind that such pieces were made to be deposited in tombs scholars think that the oversized genitals may represent the person's wish to be sexually potent in the afterlife. Also, this is strong symbolism for fertility, of course! Much of ancient Egyptian myth revolves around birth, death, and resurrection, the central story involves the god Osiris, who impregnated his wife, Isis, after he was dead, thus creating an heir, after the fact. And I can guess that the idea of fertility on all levels must have been so central to their culture, the crops, the livestock, the continuity of the royal line.
Just the other day, I saw some graffiti of a giant phallus (shall we say) in a subway station. Some things are universal!
I know in Pompeii they were placed everywhere as a symbol of good luck. (Not to lead you to a brothel, which is a common misconception). The idea is that a phallus makes you laugh, which wards off bad luck!
I like that idea, I guess. I might not put it into practice in my own home, though!
Is this sculpture broken or was this how the artist wanted the hand at the top to look? What does the hand mean?
It's meant to be that way! Rodin deliberately made many of his works to look rough and unfinished. He believed it gave his works a greater emotional impact as if you could feel the sculpture emerging from the raw material. It also differentiated his sculpture from the highly finished academic work of his contemporaries. “The artist must create a spark before he can make a fire and before art is born, the artist must ready to be consumed by the fire of his own creation,” Rodin said. As for the hand, this is part of the story of Orpheus. Orpheus was an amazingly gifted musician and singer. You might see that he's holding his lyre, a stringed instrument.
When his wife Eurydice died, he went down to the underworld and convinced the gods of the underworld by playing and singing for them to release her and send her back to the living world. But he had to promise not to look back as he and Eurydice went back up to the land of the living. He forgot, and looked back to check on Eurydice, thus losing her to the underworld again, permanently. That hand is all we see of Eurydice here.
What was Picasso thinking with this one?
That's a good question. You may already know, that Picasso was a pioneer of Cubism, a movement that was focused on distortion of perspective and reorganizing space and the components of the human figure.
The colors in this particular painting are influenced by the bleakness of World War II Europe. If you look carefully at the face, you can pick out all the normal features, 2 eyes, nose, mouth, and ear, but their arrangement is distorted to present multiple viewpoints at once. Picasso was interested in showing more than what you can get from a photograph or traditional 2-dimensional image.
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Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

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Here's what people are asking.

Who is this?
This work by Salvatore Albano depicts "The Fallen Angels" who, according to the Bible, were the angels who rebelled against God along with Lucifer, who became the Devil.
I see, thanks, now I can relate to this work.
You're welcome! Are you familiar with that Biblical story, is that what made it easier to relate to?
Yes, I am. Is that main one Lucifer?
Well it's possible the main figure, whom you sent the photo of, could be Lucifer himself, but that is just speculation. He does look very angry and determined though, I think.
Beautiful work, truly inspired.
I agree, I also love the contrast between the white marble of the sculpture and the dark stone of the base.
Yes! 
I love this serene, beautiful outdoor scene by Theodore Robinson! What drew you to this work?
The way it's painted and how gentle it is in the colors and the woman's expression. Also the fact that I don't know anything about the painter.
Theodore Robinson is considered one of the first American Impressionists, a movement that began in, and is largely associated with, France. William Merritt Chase and Childe Hassam, two artists whom we have on view on the 5th floor, are also considered American Impressionists.
The Impressionists were concerned with capturing fleeting moments resulting in often quickly painted works with visible, varying brushstrokes. There is another work by Robinson on that same wall as well as 2 works by Monet, a noted French Impressionist! Robinson even went to France to study with the French Impressionists and became close friends with Monet.
Loved the Monet paintings! Absolutely beautiful.
I agree, seeing Monet is always a treat! I especially love the reflection on the water in "The Doge's Palace," the colors are so vibrant.
Yes! One of my favorites! Was it always here? I feel like I've seen it somewhere else? Do you have any info on it?
Monet is famous for creating many versions of the "same" painting. Because the Impressionists were interested in light and capturing the effects, he would often sit at the same site for a long period of time, painting different canvases of the same thing at different times of the day to see the changing light effects. There is a painting at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in Manhattan that looks similar to this, yes! I do believe our version has also been on view for some time, so it's possible you've seen it here before as well.
I probably saw the one at The Met. I am from Brazil so this is my first time here.
Oh, well, welcome to Brooklyn! Yes, you may have seen the Met's version. Although, I think it is easy to confuse various paintings by Monet because the subject matter, colors, and style can be so similar.
That's true, thanks!
Of course!
Could you give me some information?
The subject of this painting is the sister-in-law of a friend of the artist, Henri Fantin-Latour. She was the wife of a businessman Leon Maitre. Fantin-Latour painted her three times. LaTour prefered painting quiet scenes of men and women he knew well. Like Madame Maitre, they often seem absorbed in their own interior world, a new development in society portraiture.
Surprisingly, considering how beautiful and mysterious this portrait is, the artist is best known for paintings of flowers and group portraits, not portraits of a single subject.
Is Mary supposed to be topless and this was censored?
I'm glad to see you're looking so closely at Maso di Banco's triptych. Mary is not meant to be topless, it appears as though her shirt is a sort of coral or salmon color, and the typical blue robe she is often seen wearing is draped around her. On occasion she is presented breast feeding (Madonna Lactans) the Christ Child which was seen as a sign of her compassion and does not seem to have caused offense.
This left-hand panel is separated into three 'scenes' in a vertical manner: the top scene shows the Annunciation, when the angel Gabriel came to tell Mary she would conceive Jesus. The middle scene shows the shepherds, who were told about the coming of Jesus by angels, and who visited Jesus, Mary and Joseph after Jesus' birth. And the bottom scene, that you sent a photo of, is a nativity scene. Jesus is in the manger, the Virgin Mary is relaxed next to the baby, and Joseph sits at the front, all three figures have halos above their heads. This way of showing a story in various scenes on top of each other is called a 'stacked composition' and was popular to help tell stories.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this?
This statue dates to a period when the Persian Empire controlled Egypt which explains the man's unusual clothing and jewelry. The high skirt tied at the chest is distinctly Persian as is the necklace, called a "torque," featuring ibexes. Despite the Persian garments, this man still wears an Egyptian-style wig and had Egyptian-style features.
I'd like to know what this is.
Simply put, this is a chair. The Ancient Egyptians invented chairs like this in the 2nd Dynasty and you can see similar seating depicted in some of the reliefs in the gallery. Animal feet--in this case lion--were popular on Ancient Egyptian chairs and the protrusions below the feet were designed to secure the chair in sockets.
Hi! That is the "Century Vase," made for the United States Centennial anniversary in 1876.
I bet you spotted the silhouette of George Washington already! If you keep looking, you will see many scenes from American history and images of American innovations including the sewing machine and telegraph poles! This work was meant to be publicly displayed and to act as a sort of advertisement for America's past, present, and future at that 100-year mark.
It was shown in Philadelphia in 1876, in a big exhibition that was open to the public to mark the Centennial. It had buildings and booths dedicated to various industries and trades, to art, etc. It was the first World's Fair held in the United States!
That's awesome! Super cool!
I agree! It was a major attraction. It took 10 years to plan, and it was held in the area that is present-day Fairmount Park.
How did the Brooklyn museum acquire it?
It was a gift from the descendants of the man who founded Union Porcelain Works, the Brooklyn-based company that made it.
In the erotic art from Ptolemaic Egypt, why are the proportions of the genitals so unrealistic?
Keeping in mind that such pieces were made to be deposited in tombs scholars think that the oversized genitals may represent the person's wish to be sexually potent in the afterlife. Also, this is strong symbolism for fertility, of course! Much of ancient Egyptian myth revolves around birth, death, and resurrection, the central story involves the god Osiris, who impregnated his wife, Isis, after he was dead, thus creating an heir, after the fact. And I can guess that the idea of fertility on all levels must have been so central to their culture, the crops, the livestock, the continuity of the royal line.
Just the other day, I saw some graffiti of a giant phallus (shall we say) in a subway station. Some things are universal!
I know in Pompeii they were placed everywhere as a symbol of good luck. (Not to lead you to a brothel, which is a common misconception). The idea is that a phallus makes you laugh, which wards off bad luck!
I like that idea, I guess. I might not put it into practice in my own home, though!
Is this sculpture broken or was this how the artist wanted the hand at the top to look? What does the hand mean?
It's meant to be that way! Rodin deliberately made many of his works to look rough and unfinished. He believed it gave his works a greater emotional impact as if you could feel the sculpture emerging from the raw material. It also differentiated his sculpture from the highly finished academic work of his contemporaries. “The artist must create a spark before he can make a fire and before art is born, the artist must ready to be consumed by the fire of his own creation,” Rodin said. As for the hand, this is part of the story of Orpheus. Orpheus was an amazingly gifted musician and singer. You might see that he's holding his lyre, a stringed instrument.
When his wife Eurydice died, he went down to the underworld and convinced the gods of the underworld by playing and singing for them to release her and send her back to the living world. But he had to promise not to look back as he and Eurydice went back up to the land of the living. He forgot, and looked back to check on Eurydice, thus losing her to the underworld again, permanently. That hand is all we see of Eurydice here.
What was Picasso thinking with this one?
That's a good question. You may already know, that Picasso was a pioneer of Cubism, a movement that was focused on distortion of perspective and reorganizing space and the components of the human figure.
The colors in this particular painting are influenced by the bleakness of World War II Europe. If you look carefully at the face, you can pick out all the normal features, 2 eyes, nose, mouth, and ear, but their arrangement is distorted to present multiple viewpoints at once. Picasso was interested in showing more than what you can get from a photograph or traditional 2-dimensional image.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.