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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is this considered a Fauvist painting?
Yes it is. With its undisguised vivid brushstrokes and high-keyed, vibrant colors directly from the tube, this is a typical fauvist painting. 
Henri Matisse painted it just one year after debuting his new style at the 1905 Salon d'Autumn in Paris. (It was during that exhibition that the witty critic Louis Vauxcelles called such paintings "fauves," meaning "wild beasts," in his review for the magazine Gil Blas.) This picture still shows the influence of neo-impressionism (also sometimes called pointillism), with its short dabs of color in the lower left and on the nude herself. As the years went by, Matisse moved to a greater focus on powerful line and flat color.
Interestingly this picture was the first work by Matisse to enter an American art collection. The American painter and frame-maker George F. Of purchased it from the expatriate Mrs. Michael Stein, the sister-in-law of Gertrude Stein.
Why is it called Avarice?
"Avarice" means "extreme greed," and this work, by Fernando Mastrangelo deals with the idea of greed.
The depiction of corn-based products draws attention to Mexico’s mass cultivation of corn to meet energy needs and foreign consumer demands.
Mastrangelo uses one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone, which dates from about 1500 and symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Unchanged is the Aztec sun god Tonatiuh, who looks out from the stone’s center – his knife-like tongue is stuck out in a representation of his hunger for the human sacrifice. We can infer the image of the implacable imperial force with which the United States achieves its economic agenda in the Americas.
What does the skirt pattern represent?
 The pattern on the skirt is a reference a specific to a specific king's reign. You may have read this on the label, but "A motif on the figure's kilt depicting an elephant, whose trunk ends in a human right hand, identifies this work with the reign of the oba Esigie, who ruled from 1504 to 1550."
What is the connection between large orange cats and the words "fear" and "denial" on pendants hanging from a gold chain that is connected?
In the work of Pepon Osorio, the cats comes from the domestic aesthetic of his mother's house, as she would have kitsch objects like these stuffed cats as decoration. And the words "fear" and "denial" play as visual metaphors for the power of that which is not acknowledged. Feelings that often are present in households, or even in the Latino community of New York, but are often never addressed.
Why did the artist use cat figurines in this work?
The artist explains that these figures remind him of the sort of kitschy knick-knacks he would see around his mother's house when he would leave art school to visit.
For him, these figurines were the opposite of the "high art" that he was studying in school. So, he created a "high art" version of the tchotchkes.
Why are the skateboards placed in this particular order?
This was actually just a choice by the curator and artist based on how they looked best in this particular space. It has been installed differently when it was shown elsewhere.
(We have some images of the piece being shown in galleries where they are clustered much more closely together in a circle with them all touching.)
How does this relate to the gallery? It reminds me of Pollock.
That's a really interesting piece, and like everything else in this "Diverse Works" show, it was acquired sometime during the past 18 years, under the outgoing director.
Bidlo purposely copies the styles of famous artists who came before him in order to make us question the idea of originality. In the early 1980s, he did a whole solo show of paintings appropriating Pollock's style. It helped to make him famous.
It was probably chosen for the Museum's collection because it's a good example of the "appropriation art" movement of the 1980s -- when many artists were sampling from art or other imagery that had come before them, and putting whatever they borrowed into new contexts.
What material is this made out of?
That is actually made from plywood (the frame) and plastic (the flecked parts that you see). But we have a note here that the item is made from a recycled plastic called "origin. "
Crows picking at bodies-this is horrifying. Are they soldiers? Where is this set?
It is, isn't it? Vereshchagin painted his direct observations during the Russo-Turkish war. Turkish prisoners or war froze to death while being marched from Plevna in northern Bulgaria to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Vereshchagin watched the men collapse out of weakness. The two paintings serve as a sort of before-and-after: In the days after the tragedy, there was nobody to move the bodies off the road so passing carts and gun-carriages crushed them into the snow.
I'm interested in how it's placed next to the Anisfeld seascape. Is there a narrative to be drawn from this wall? Or is it more thematic?
This wall is devoted to Russian modern art and features thirteen paintings spanning 100 years. The diversity of their scale, subject-matter, and style is a tribute to the dramatic aesthetic and political changes taking place in Russia, and across Europe, during the late-19th and early-20th centuries. Large-scale landscapes seen from unusual perspectives were a popular genre in Russia at this time. The paintings by Vasily Vereshchagin and Boris Anisfeld both draw attention to the vastness of the Russian Empire's landscape and the powerful impact of the elements. Vereshchagin shows the ferocity and bleakness of winter in the fields of Bulgaria. In Anisfeld’s canvas, painted from the Aiou-Dagh Mountain in the Crimean Peninsula, the artist introduces a new aerial viewpoint emphasizing the clouds and reducing the battleship below to a tiny object in the vast sea. Vereshschagin's picture conveys a message about the nature of warfare. The artist witnessed the devastating Russo-Turkish war of 1877 and was deeply affected by the loss of life on both sides.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is this considered a Fauvist painting?
Yes it is. With its undisguised vivid brushstrokes and high-keyed, vibrant colors directly from the tube, this is a typical fauvist painting. 
Henri Matisse painted it just one year after debuting his new style at the 1905 Salon d'Autumn in Paris. (It was during that exhibition that the witty critic Louis Vauxcelles called such paintings "fauves," meaning "wild beasts," in his review for the magazine Gil Blas.) This picture still shows the influence of neo-impressionism (also sometimes called pointillism), with its short dabs of color in the lower left and on the nude herself. As the years went by, Matisse moved to a greater focus on powerful line and flat color.
Interestingly this picture was the first work by Matisse to enter an American art collection. The American painter and frame-maker George F. Of purchased it from the expatriate Mrs. Michael Stein, the sister-in-law of Gertrude Stein.
Why is it called Avarice?
"Avarice" means "extreme greed," and this work, by Fernando Mastrangelo deals with the idea of greed.
The depiction of corn-based products draws attention to Mexico’s mass cultivation of corn to meet energy needs and foreign consumer demands.
Mastrangelo uses one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone, which dates from about 1500 and symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Unchanged is the Aztec sun god Tonatiuh, who looks out from the stone’s center – his knife-like tongue is stuck out in a representation of his hunger for the human sacrifice. We can infer the image of the implacable imperial force with which the United States achieves its economic agenda in the Americas.
What does the skirt pattern represent?
 The pattern on the skirt is a reference a specific to a specific king's reign. You may have read this on the label, but "A motif on the figure's kilt depicting an elephant, whose trunk ends in a human right hand, identifies this work with the reign of the oba Esigie, who ruled from 1504 to 1550."
What is the connection between large orange cats and the words "fear" and "denial" on pendants hanging from a gold chain that is connected?
In the work of Pepon Osorio, the cats comes from the domestic aesthetic of his mother's house, as she would have kitsch objects like these stuffed cats as decoration. And the words "fear" and "denial" play as visual metaphors for the power of that which is not acknowledged. Feelings that often are present in households, or even in the Latino community of New York, but are often never addressed.
Why did the artist use cat figurines in this work?
The artist explains that these figures remind him of the sort of kitschy knick-knacks he would see around his mother's house when he would leave art school to visit.
For him, these figurines were the opposite of the "high art" that he was studying in school. So, he created a "high art" version of the tchotchkes.
Why are the skateboards placed in this particular order?
This was actually just a choice by the curator and artist based on how they looked best in this particular space. It has been installed differently when it was shown elsewhere.
(We have some images of the piece being shown in galleries where they are clustered much more closely together in a circle with them all touching.)
How does this relate to the gallery? It reminds me of Pollock.
That's a really interesting piece, and like everything else in this "Diverse Works" show, it was acquired sometime during the past 18 years, under the outgoing director.
Bidlo purposely copies the styles of famous artists who came before him in order to make us question the idea of originality. In the early 1980s, he did a whole solo show of paintings appropriating Pollock's style. It helped to make him famous.
It was probably chosen for the Museum's collection because it's a good example of the "appropriation art" movement of the 1980s -- when many artists were sampling from art or other imagery that had come before them, and putting whatever they borrowed into new contexts.
What material is this made out of?
That is actually made from plywood (the frame) and plastic (the flecked parts that you see). But we have a note here that the item is made from a recycled plastic called "origin. "
Crows picking at bodies-this is horrifying. Are they soldiers? Where is this set?
It is, isn't it? Vereshchagin painted his direct observations during the Russo-Turkish war. Turkish prisoners or war froze to death while being marched from Plevna in northern Bulgaria to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Vereshchagin watched the men collapse out of weakness. The two paintings serve as a sort of before-and-after: In the days after the tragedy, there was nobody to move the bodies off the road so passing carts and gun-carriages crushed them into the snow.
I'm interested in how it's placed next to the Anisfeld seascape. Is there a narrative to be drawn from this wall? Or is it more thematic?
This wall is devoted to Russian modern art and features thirteen paintings spanning 100 years. The diversity of their scale, subject-matter, and style is a tribute to the dramatic aesthetic and political changes taking place in Russia, and across Europe, during the late-19th and early-20th centuries. Large-scale landscapes seen from unusual perspectives were a popular genre in Russia at this time. The paintings by Vasily Vereshchagin and Boris Anisfeld both draw attention to the vastness of the Russian Empire's landscape and the powerful impact of the elements. Vereshchagin shows the ferocity and bleakness of winter in the fields of Bulgaria. In Anisfeld’s canvas, painted from the Aiou-Dagh Mountain in the Crimean Peninsula, the artist introduces a new aerial viewpoint emphasizing the clouds and reducing the battleship below to a tiny object in the vast sea. Vereshschagin's picture conveys a message about the nature of warfare. The artist witnessed the devastating Russo-Turkish war of 1877 and was deeply affected by the loss of life on both sides.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is this considered a Fauvist painting?
Yes it is. With its undisguised vivid brushstrokes and high-keyed, vibrant colors directly from the tube, this is a typical fauvist painting. 
Henri Matisse painted it just one year after debuting his new style at the 1905 Salon d'Autumn in Paris. (It was during that exhibition that the witty critic Louis Vauxcelles called such paintings "fauves," meaning "wild beasts," in his review for the magazine Gil Blas.) This picture still shows the influence of neo-impressionism (also sometimes called pointillism), with its short dabs of color in the lower left and on the nude herself. As the years went by, Matisse moved to a greater focus on powerful line and flat color.
Interestingly this picture was the first work by Matisse to enter an American art collection. The American painter and frame-maker George F. Of purchased it from the expatriate Mrs. Michael Stein, the sister-in-law of Gertrude Stein.
Why is it called Avarice?
"Avarice" means "extreme greed," and this work, by Fernando Mastrangelo deals with the idea of greed.
The depiction of corn-based products draws attention to Mexico’s mass cultivation of corn to meet energy needs and foreign consumer demands.
Mastrangelo uses one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone, which dates from about 1500 and symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Unchanged is the Aztec sun god Tonatiuh, who looks out from the stone’s center – his knife-like tongue is stuck out in a representation of his hunger for the human sacrifice. We can infer the image of the implacable imperial force with which the United States achieves its economic agenda in the Americas.
What does the skirt pattern represent?
 The pattern on the skirt is a reference a specific to a specific king's reign. You may have read this on the label, but "A motif on the figure's kilt depicting an elephant, whose trunk ends in a human right hand, identifies this work with the reign of the oba Esigie, who ruled from 1504 to 1550."
What is the connection between large orange cats and the words "fear" and "denial" on pendants hanging from a gold chain that is connected?
In the work of Pepon Osorio, the cats comes from the domestic aesthetic of his mother's house, as she would have kitsch objects like these stuffed cats as decoration. And the words "fear" and "denial" play as visual metaphors for the power of that which is not acknowledged. Feelings that often are present in households, or even in the Latino community of New York, but are often never addressed.
Why did the artist use cat figurines in this work?
The artist explains that these figures remind him of the sort of kitschy knick-knacks he would see around his mother's house when he would leave art school to visit.
For him, these figurines were the opposite of the "high art" that he was studying in school. So, he created a "high art" version of the tchotchkes.
Why are the skateboards placed in this particular order?
This was actually just a choice by the curator and artist based on how they looked best in this particular space. It has been installed differently when it was shown elsewhere.
(We have some images of the piece being shown in galleries where they are clustered much more closely together in a circle with them all touching.)
How does this relate to the gallery? It reminds me of Pollock.
That's a really interesting piece, and like everything else in this "Diverse Works" show, it was acquired sometime during the past 18 years, under the outgoing director.
Bidlo purposely copies the styles of famous artists who came before him in order to make us question the idea of originality. In the early 1980s, he did a whole solo show of paintings appropriating Pollock's style. It helped to make him famous.
It was probably chosen for the Museum's collection because it's a good example of the "appropriation art" movement of the 1980s -- when many artists were sampling from art or other imagery that had come before them, and putting whatever they borrowed into new contexts.
What material is this made out of?
That is actually made from plywood (the frame) and plastic (the flecked parts that you see). But we have a note here that the item is made from a recycled plastic called "origin. "
Crows picking at bodies-this is horrifying. Are they soldiers? Where is this set?
It is, isn't it? Vereshchagin painted his direct observations during the Russo-Turkish war. Turkish prisoners or war froze to death while being marched from Plevna in northern Bulgaria to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Vereshchagin watched the men collapse out of weakness. The two paintings serve as a sort of before-and-after: In the days after the tragedy, there was nobody to move the bodies off the road so passing carts and gun-carriages crushed them into the snow.
I'm interested in how it's placed next to the Anisfeld seascape. Is there a narrative to be drawn from this wall? Or is it more thematic?
This wall is devoted to Russian modern art and features thirteen paintings spanning 100 years. The diversity of their scale, subject-matter, and style is a tribute to the dramatic aesthetic and political changes taking place in Russia, and across Europe, during the late-19th and early-20th centuries. Large-scale landscapes seen from unusual perspectives were a popular genre in Russia at this time. The paintings by Vasily Vereshchagin and Boris Anisfeld both draw attention to the vastness of the Russian Empire's landscape and the powerful impact of the elements. Vereshchagin shows the ferocity and bleakness of winter in the fields of Bulgaria. In Anisfeld’s canvas, painted from the Aiou-Dagh Mountain in the Crimean Peninsula, the artist introduces a new aerial viewpoint emphasizing the clouds and reducing the battleship below to a tiny object in the vast sea. Vereshschagin's picture conveys a message about the nature of warfare. The artist witnessed the devastating Russo-Turkish war of 1877 and was deeply affected by the loss of life on both sides.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until spring 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is this considered a Fauvist painting?
Yes it is. With its undisguised vivid brushstrokes and high-keyed, vibrant colors directly from the tube, this is a typical fauvist painting. 
Henri Matisse painted it just one year after debuting his new style at the 1905 Salon d'Autumn in Paris. (It was during that exhibition that the witty critic Louis Vauxcelles called such paintings "fauves," meaning "wild beasts," in his review for the magazine Gil Blas.) This picture still shows the influence of neo-impressionism (also sometimes called pointillism), with its short dabs of color in the lower left and on the nude herself. As the years went by, Matisse moved to a greater focus on powerful line and flat color.
Interestingly this picture was the first work by Matisse to enter an American art collection. The American painter and frame-maker George F. Of purchased it from the expatriate Mrs. Michael Stein, the sister-in-law of Gertrude Stein.
Why is it called Avarice?
"Avarice" means "extreme greed," and this work, by Fernando Mastrangelo deals with the idea of greed.
The depiction of corn-based products draws attention to Mexico’s mass cultivation of corn to meet energy needs and foreign consumer demands.
Mastrangelo uses one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone, which dates from about 1500 and symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Unchanged is the Aztec sun god Tonatiuh, who looks out from the stone’s center – his knife-like tongue is stuck out in a representation of his hunger for the human sacrifice. We can infer the image of the implacable imperial force with which the United States achieves its economic agenda in the Americas.
What does the skirt pattern represent?
 The pattern on the skirt is a reference a specific to a specific king's reign. You may have read this on the label, but "A motif on the figure's kilt depicting an elephant, whose trunk ends in a human right hand, identifies this work with the reign of the oba Esigie, who ruled from 1504 to 1550."
What is the connection between large orange cats and the words "fear" and "denial" on pendants hanging from a gold chain that is connected?
In the work of Pepon Osorio, the cats comes from the domestic aesthetic of his mother's house, as she would have kitsch objects like these stuffed cats as decoration. And the words "fear" and "denial" play as visual metaphors for the power of that which is not acknowledged. Feelings that often are present in households, or even in the Latino community of New York, but are often never addressed.
Why did the artist use cat figurines in this work?
The artist explains that these figures remind him of the sort of kitschy knick-knacks he would see around his mother's house when he would leave art school to visit.
For him, these figurines were the opposite of the "high art" that he was studying in school. So, he created a "high art" version of the tchotchkes.
Why are the skateboards placed in this particular order?
This was actually just a choice by the curator and artist based on how they looked best in this particular space. It has been installed differently when it was shown elsewhere.
(We have some images of the piece being shown in galleries where they are clustered much more closely together in a circle with them all touching.)
How does this relate to the gallery? It reminds me of Pollock.
That's a really interesting piece, and like everything else in this "Diverse Works" show, it was acquired sometime during the past 18 years, under the outgoing director.
Bidlo purposely copies the styles of famous artists who came before him in order to make us question the idea of originality. In the early 1980s, he did a whole solo show of paintings appropriating Pollock's style. It helped to make him famous.
It was probably chosen for the Museum's collection because it's a good example of the "appropriation art" movement of the 1980s -- when many artists were sampling from art or other imagery that had come before them, and putting whatever they borrowed into new contexts.
What material is this made out of?
That is actually made from plywood (the frame) and plastic (the flecked parts that you see). But we have a note here that the item is made from a recycled plastic called "origin. "
Crows picking at bodies-this is horrifying. Are they soldiers? Where is this set?
It is, isn't it? Vereshchagin painted his direct observations during the Russo-Turkish war. Turkish prisoners or war froze to death while being marched from Plevna in northern Bulgaria to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Vereshchagin watched the men collapse out of weakness. The two paintings serve as a sort of before-and-after: In the days after the tragedy, there was nobody to move the bodies off the road so passing carts and gun-carriages crushed them into the snow.
I'm interested in how it's placed next to the Anisfeld seascape. Is there a narrative to be drawn from this wall? Or is it more thematic?
This wall is devoted to Russian modern art and features thirteen paintings spanning 100 years. The diversity of their scale, subject-matter, and style is a tribute to the dramatic aesthetic and political changes taking place in Russia, and across Europe, during the late-19th and early-20th centuries. Large-scale landscapes seen from unusual perspectives were a popular genre in Russia at this time. The paintings by Vasily Vereshchagin and Boris Anisfeld both draw attention to the vastness of the Russian Empire's landscape and the powerful impact of the elements. Vereshchagin shows the ferocity and bleakness of winter in the fields of Bulgaria. In Anisfeld’s canvas, painted from the Aiou-Dagh Mountain in the Crimean Peninsula, the artist introduces a new aerial viewpoint emphasizing the clouds and reducing the battleship below to a tiny object in the vast sea. Vereshschagin's picture conveys a message about the nature of warfare. The artist witnessed the devastating Russo-Turkish war of 1877 and was deeply affected by the loss of life on both sides.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is this considered a Fauvist painting?
Yes it is. With its undisguised vivid brushstrokes and high-keyed, vibrant colors directly from the tube, this is a typical fauvist painting. 
Henri Matisse painted it just one year after debuting his new style at the 1905 Salon d'Autumn in Paris. (It was during that exhibition that the witty critic Louis Vauxcelles called such paintings "fauves," meaning "wild beasts," in his review for the magazine Gil Blas.) This picture still shows the influence of neo-impressionism (also sometimes called pointillism), with its short dabs of color in the lower left and on the nude herself. As the years went by, Matisse moved to a greater focus on powerful line and flat color.
Interestingly this picture was the first work by Matisse to enter an American art collection. The American painter and frame-maker George F. Of purchased it from the expatriate Mrs. Michael Stein, the sister-in-law of Gertrude Stein.
Why is it called Avarice?
"Avarice" means "extreme greed," and this work, by Fernando Mastrangelo deals with the idea of greed.
The depiction of corn-based products draws attention to Mexico’s mass cultivation of corn to meet energy needs and foreign consumer demands.
Mastrangelo uses one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone, which dates from about 1500 and symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Unchanged is the Aztec sun god Tonatiuh, who looks out from the stone’s center – his knife-like tongue is stuck out in a representation of his hunger for the human sacrifice. We can infer the image of the implacable imperial force with which the United States achieves its economic agenda in the Americas.
What does the skirt pattern represent?
 The pattern on the skirt is a reference a specific to a specific king's reign. You may have read this on the label, but "A motif on the figure's kilt depicting an elephant, whose trunk ends in a human right hand, identifies this work with the reign of the oba Esigie, who ruled from 1504 to 1550."
What is the connection between large orange cats and the words "fear" and "denial" on pendants hanging from a gold chain that is connected?
In the work of Pepon Osorio, the cats comes from the domestic aesthetic of his mother's house, as she would have kitsch objects like these stuffed cats as decoration. And the words "fear" and "denial" play as visual metaphors for the power of that which is not acknowledged. Feelings that often are present in households, or even in the Latino community of New York, but are often never addressed.
Why did the artist use cat figurines in this work?
The artist explains that these figures remind him of the sort of kitschy knick-knacks he would see around his mother's house when he would leave art school to visit.
For him, these figurines were the opposite of the "high art" that he was studying in school. So, he created a "high art" version of the tchotchkes.
Why are the skateboards placed in this particular order?
This was actually just a choice by the curator and artist based on how they looked best in this particular space. It has been installed differently when it was shown elsewhere.
(We have some images of the piece being shown in galleries where they are clustered much more closely together in a circle with them all touching.)
How does this relate to the gallery? It reminds me of Pollock.
That's a really interesting piece, and like everything else in this "Diverse Works" show, it was acquired sometime during the past 18 years, under the outgoing director.
Bidlo purposely copies the styles of famous artists who came before him in order to make us question the idea of originality. In the early 1980s, he did a whole solo show of paintings appropriating Pollock's style. It helped to make him famous.
It was probably chosen for the Museum's collection because it's a good example of the "appropriation art" movement of the 1980s -- when many artists were sampling from art or other imagery that had come before them, and putting whatever they borrowed into new contexts.
What material is this made out of?
That is actually made from plywood (the frame) and plastic (the flecked parts that you see). But we have a note here that the item is made from a recycled plastic called "origin. "
Crows picking at bodies-this is horrifying. Are they soldiers? Where is this set?
It is, isn't it? Vereshchagin painted his direct observations during the Russo-Turkish war. Turkish prisoners or war froze to death while being marched from Plevna in northern Bulgaria to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Vereshchagin watched the men collapse out of weakness. The two paintings serve as a sort of before-and-after: In the days after the tragedy, there was nobody to move the bodies off the road so passing carts and gun-carriages crushed them into the snow.
I'm interested in how it's placed next to the Anisfeld seascape. Is there a narrative to be drawn from this wall? Or is it more thematic?
This wall is devoted to Russian modern art and features thirteen paintings spanning 100 years. The diversity of their scale, subject-matter, and style is a tribute to the dramatic aesthetic and political changes taking place in Russia, and across Europe, during the late-19th and early-20th centuries. Large-scale landscapes seen from unusual perspectives were a popular genre in Russia at this time. The paintings by Vasily Vereshchagin and Boris Anisfeld both draw attention to the vastness of the Russian Empire's landscape and the powerful impact of the elements. Vereshchagin shows the ferocity and bleakness of winter in the fields of Bulgaria. In Anisfeld’s canvas, painted from the Aiou-Dagh Mountain in the Crimean Peninsula, the artist introduces a new aerial viewpoint emphasizing the clouds and reducing the battleship below to a tiny object in the vast sea. Vereshschagin's picture conveys a message about the nature of warfare. The artist witnessed the devastating Russo-Turkish war of 1877 and was deeply affected by the loss of life on both sides.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is this considered a Fauvist painting?
Yes it is. With its undisguised vivid brushstrokes and high-keyed, vibrant colors directly from the tube, this is a typical fauvist painting. 
Henri Matisse painted it just one year after debuting his new style at the 1905 Salon d'Autumn in Paris. (It was during that exhibition that the witty critic Louis Vauxcelles called such paintings "fauves," meaning "wild beasts," in his review for the magazine Gil Blas.) This picture still shows the influence of neo-impressionism (also sometimes called pointillism), with its short dabs of color in the lower left and on the nude herself. As the years went by, Matisse moved to a greater focus on powerful line and flat color.
Interestingly this picture was the first work by Matisse to enter an American art collection. The American painter and frame-maker George F. Of purchased it from the expatriate Mrs. Michael Stein, the sister-in-law of Gertrude Stein.
Why is it called Avarice?
"Avarice" means "extreme greed," and this work, by Fernando Mastrangelo deals with the idea of greed.
The depiction of corn-based products draws attention to Mexico’s mass cultivation of corn to meet energy needs and foreign consumer demands.
Mastrangelo uses one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone, which dates from about 1500 and symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Unchanged is the Aztec sun god Tonatiuh, who looks out from the stone’s center – his knife-like tongue is stuck out in a representation of his hunger for the human sacrifice. We can infer the image of the implacable imperial force with which the United States achieves its economic agenda in the Americas.
What does the skirt pattern represent?
 The pattern on the skirt is a reference a specific to a specific king's reign. You may have read this on the label, but "A motif on the figure's kilt depicting an elephant, whose trunk ends in a human right hand, identifies this work with the reign of the oba Esigie, who ruled from 1504 to 1550."
What is the connection between large orange cats and the words "fear" and "denial" on pendants hanging from a gold chain that is connected?
In the work of Pepon Osorio, the cats comes from the domestic aesthetic of his mother's house, as she would have kitsch objects like these stuffed cats as decoration. And the words "fear" and "denial" play as visual metaphors for the power of that which is not acknowledged. Feelings that often are present in households, or even in the Latino community of New York, but are often never addressed.
Why did the artist use cat figurines in this work?
The artist explains that these figures remind him of the sort of kitschy knick-knacks he would see around his mother's house when he would leave art school to visit.
For him, these figurines were the opposite of the "high art" that he was studying in school. So, he created a "high art" version of the tchotchkes.
Why are the skateboards placed in this particular order?
This was actually just a choice by the curator and artist based on how they looked best in this particular space. It has been installed differently when it was shown elsewhere.
(We have some images of the piece being shown in galleries where they are clustered much more closely together in a circle with them all touching.)
How does this relate to the gallery? It reminds me of Pollock.
That's a really interesting piece, and like everything else in this "Diverse Works" show, it was acquired sometime during the past 18 years, under the outgoing director.
Bidlo purposely copies the styles of famous artists who came before him in order to make us question the idea of originality. In the early 1980s, he did a whole solo show of paintings appropriating Pollock's style. It helped to make him famous.
It was probably chosen for the Museum's collection because it's a good example of the "appropriation art" movement of the 1980s -- when many artists were sampling from art or other imagery that had come before them, and putting whatever they borrowed into new contexts.
What material is this made out of?
That is actually made from plywood (the frame) and plastic (the flecked parts that you see). But we have a note here that the item is made from a recycled plastic called "origin. "
Crows picking at bodies-this is horrifying. Are they soldiers? Where is this set?
It is, isn't it? Vereshchagin painted his direct observations during the Russo-Turkish war. Turkish prisoners or war froze to death while being marched from Plevna in northern Bulgaria to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Vereshchagin watched the men collapse out of weakness. The two paintings serve as a sort of before-and-after: In the days after the tragedy, there was nobody to move the bodies off the road so passing carts and gun-carriages crushed them into the snow.
I'm interested in how it's placed next to the Anisfeld seascape. Is there a narrative to be drawn from this wall? Or is it more thematic?
This wall is devoted to Russian modern art and features thirteen paintings spanning 100 years. The diversity of their scale, subject-matter, and style is a tribute to the dramatic aesthetic and political changes taking place in Russia, and across Europe, during the late-19th and early-20th centuries. Large-scale landscapes seen from unusual perspectives were a popular genre in Russia at this time. The paintings by Vasily Vereshchagin and Boris Anisfeld both draw attention to the vastness of the Russian Empire's landscape and the powerful impact of the elements. Vereshchagin shows the ferocity and bleakness of winter in the fields of Bulgaria. In Anisfeld’s canvas, painted from the Aiou-Dagh Mountain in the Crimean Peninsula, the artist introduces a new aerial viewpoint emphasizing the clouds and reducing the battleship below to a tiny object in the vast sea. Vereshschagin's picture conveys a message about the nature of warfare. The artist witnessed the devastating Russo-Turkish war of 1877 and was deeply affected by the loss of life on both sides.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is this considered a Fauvist painting?
Yes it is. With its undisguised vivid brushstrokes and high-keyed, vibrant colors directly from the tube, this is a typical fauvist painting. 
Henri Matisse painted it just one year after debuting his new style at the 1905 Salon d'Autumn in Paris. (It was during that exhibition that the witty critic Louis Vauxcelles called such paintings "fauves," meaning "wild beasts," in his review for the magazine Gil Blas.) This picture still shows the influence of neo-impressionism (also sometimes called pointillism), with its short dabs of color in the lower left and on the nude herself. As the years went by, Matisse moved to a greater focus on powerful line and flat color.
Interestingly this picture was the first work by Matisse to enter an American art collection. The American painter and frame-maker George F. Of purchased it from the expatriate Mrs. Michael Stein, the sister-in-law of Gertrude Stein.
Why is it called Avarice?
"Avarice" means "extreme greed," and this work, by Fernando Mastrangelo deals with the idea of greed.
The depiction of corn-based products draws attention to Mexico’s mass cultivation of corn to meet energy needs and foreign consumer demands.
Mastrangelo uses one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone, which dates from about 1500 and symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Unchanged is the Aztec sun god Tonatiuh, who looks out from the stone’s center – his knife-like tongue is stuck out in a representation of his hunger for the human sacrifice. We can infer the image of the implacable imperial force with which the United States achieves its economic agenda in the Americas.
What does the skirt pattern represent?
 The pattern on the skirt is a reference a specific to a specific king's reign. You may have read this on the label, but "A motif on the figure's kilt depicting an elephant, whose trunk ends in a human right hand, identifies this work with the reign of the oba Esigie, who ruled from 1504 to 1550."
What is the connection between large orange cats and the words "fear" and "denial" on pendants hanging from a gold chain that is connected?
In the work of Pepon Osorio, the cats comes from the domestic aesthetic of his mother's house, as she would have kitsch objects like these stuffed cats as decoration. And the words "fear" and "denial" play as visual metaphors for the power of that which is not acknowledged. Feelings that often are present in households, or even in the Latino community of New York, but are often never addressed.
Why did the artist use cat figurines in this work?
The artist explains that these figures remind him of the sort of kitschy knick-knacks he would see around his mother's house when he would leave art school to visit.
For him, these figurines were the opposite of the "high art" that he was studying in school. So, he created a "high art" version of the tchotchkes.
Why are the skateboards placed in this particular order?
This was actually just a choice by the curator and artist based on how they looked best in this particular space. It has been installed differently when it was shown elsewhere.
(We have some images of the piece being shown in galleries where they are clustered much more closely together in a circle with them all touching.)
How does this relate to the gallery? It reminds me of Pollock.
That's a really interesting piece, and like everything else in this "Diverse Works" show, it was acquired sometime during the past 18 years, under the outgoing director.
Bidlo purposely copies the styles of famous artists who came before him in order to make us question the idea of originality. In the early 1980s, he did a whole solo show of paintings appropriating Pollock's style. It helped to make him famous.
It was probably chosen for the Museum's collection because it's a good example of the "appropriation art" movement of the 1980s -- when many artists were sampling from art or other imagery that had come before them, and putting whatever they borrowed into new contexts.
What material is this made out of?
That is actually made from plywood (the frame) and plastic (the flecked parts that you see). But we have a note here that the item is made from a recycled plastic called "origin. "
Crows picking at bodies-this is horrifying. Are they soldiers? Where is this set?
It is, isn't it? Vereshchagin painted his direct observations during the Russo-Turkish war. Turkish prisoners or war froze to death while being marched from Plevna in northern Bulgaria to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Vereshchagin watched the men collapse out of weakness. The two paintings serve as a sort of before-and-after: In the days after the tragedy, there was nobody to move the bodies off the road so passing carts and gun-carriages crushed them into the snow.
I'm interested in how it's placed next to the Anisfeld seascape. Is there a narrative to be drawn from this wall? Or is it more thematic?
This wall is devoted to Russian modern art and features thirteen paintings spanning 100 years. The diversity of their scale, subject-matter, and style is a tribute to the dramatic aesthetic and political changes taking place in Russia, and across Europe, during the late-19th and early-20th centuries. Large-scale landscapes seen from unusual perspectives were a popular genre in Russia at this time. The paintings by Vasily Vereshchagin and Boris Anisfeld both draw attention to the vastness of the Russian Empire's landscape and the powerful impact of the elements. Vereshchagin shows the ferocity and bleakness of winter in the fields of Bulgaria. In Anisfeld’s canvas, painted from the Aiou-Dagh Mountain in the Crimean Peninsula, the artist introduces a new aerial viewpoint emphasizing the clouds and reducing the battleship below to a tiny object in the vast sea. Vereshschagin's picture conveys a message about the nature of warfare. The artist witnessed the devastating Russo-Turkish war of 1877 and was deeply affected by the loss of life on both sides.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is this considered a Fauvist painting?
Yes it is. With its undisguised vivid brushstrokes and high-keyed, vibrant colors directly from the tube, this is a typical fauvist painting. 
Henri Matisse painted it just one year after debuting his new style at the 1905 Salon d'Autumn in Paris. (It was during that exhibition that the witty critic Louis Vauxcelles called such paintings "fauves," meaning "wild beasts," in his review for the magazine Gil Blas.) This picture still shows the influence of neo-impressionism (also sometimes called pointillism), with its short dabs of color in the lower left and on the nude herself. As the years went by, Matisse moved to a greater focus on powerful line and flat color.
Interestingly this picture was the first work by Matisse to enter an American art collection. The American painter and frame-maker George F. Of purchased it from the expatriate Mrs. Michael Stein, the sister-in-law of Gertrude Stein.
Why is it called Avarice?
"Avarice" means "extreme greed," and this work, by Fernando Mastrangelo deals with the idea of greed.
The depiction of corn-based products draws attention to Mexico’s mass cultivation of corn to meet energy needs and foreign consumer demands.
Mastrangelo uses one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone, which dates from about 1500 and symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Unchanged is the Aztec sun god Tonatiuh, who looks out from the stone’s center – his knife-like tongue is stuck out in a representation of his hunger for the human sacrifice. We can infer the image of the implacable imperial force with which the United States achieves its economic agenda in the Americas.
What does the skirt pattern represent?
 The pattern on the skirt is a reference a specific to a specific king's reign. You may have read this on the label, but "A motif on the figure's kilt depicting an elephant, whose trunk ends in a human right hand, identifies this work with the reign of the oba Esigie, who ruled from 1504 to 1550."
What is the connection between large orange cats and the words "fear" and "denial" on pendants hanging from a gold chain that is connected?
In the work of Pepon Osorio, the cats comes from the domestic aesthetic of his mother's house, as she would have kitsch objects like these stuffed cats as decoration. And the words "fear" and "denial" play as visual metaphors for the power of that which is not acknowledged. Feelings that often are present in households, or even in the Latino community of New York, but are often never addressed.
Why did the artist use cat figurines in this work?
The artist explains that these figures remind him of the sort of kitschy knick-knacks he would see around his mother's house when he would leave art school to visit.
For him, these figurines were the opposite of the "high art" that he was studying in school. So, he created a "high art" version of the tchotchkes.
Why are the skateboards placed in this particular order?
This was actually just a choice by the curator and artist based on how they looked best in this particular space. It has been installed differently when it was shown elsewhere.
(We have some images of the piece being shown in galleries where they are clustered much more closely together in a circle with them all touching.)
How does this relate to the gallery? It reminds me of Pollock.
That's a really interesting piece, and like everything else in this "Diverse Works" show, it was acquired sometime during the past 18 years, under the outgoing director.
Bidlo purposely copies the styles of famous artists who came before him in order to make us question the idea of originality. In the early 1980s, he did a whole solo show of paintings appropriating Pollock's style. It helped to make him famous.
It was probably chosen for the Museum's collection because it's a good example of the "appropriation art" movement of the 1980s -- when many artists were sampling from art or other imagery that had come before them, and putting whatever they borrowed into new contexts.
What material is this made out of?
That is actually made from plywood (the frame) and plastic (the flecked parts that you see). But we have a note here that the item is made from a recycled plastic called "origin. "
Crows picking at bodies-this is horrifying. Are they soldiers? Where is this set?
It is, isn't it? Vereshchagin painted his direct observations during the Russo-Turkish war. Turkish prisoners or war froze to death while being marched from Plevna in northern Bulgaria to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Vereshchagin watched the men collapse out of weakness. The two paintings serve as a sort of before-and-after: In the days after the tragedy, there was nobody to move the bodies off the road so passing carts and gun-carriages crushed them into the snow.
I'm interested in how it's placed next to the Anisfeld seascape. Is there a narrative to be drawn from this wall? Or is it more thematic?
This wall is devoted to Russian modern art and features thirteen paintings spanning 100 years. The diversity of their scale, subject-matter, and style is a tribute to the dramatic aesthetic and political changes taking place in Russia, and across Europe, during the late-19th and early-20th centuries. Large-scale landscapes seen from unusual perspectives were a popular genre in Russia at this time. The paintings by Vasily Vereshchagin and Boris Anisfeld both draw attention to the vastness of the Russian Empire's landscape and the powerful impact of the elements. Vereshchagin shows the ferocity and bleakness of winter in the fields of Bulgaria. In Anisfeld’s canvas, painted from the Aiou-Dagh Mountain in the Crimean Peninsula, the artist introduces a new aerial viewpoint emphasizing the clouds and reducing the battleship below to a tiny object in the vast sea. Vereshschagin's picture conveys a message about the nature of warfare. The artist witnessed the devastating Russo-Turkish war of 1877 and was deeply affected by the loss of life on both sides.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is this considered a Fauvist painting?
Yes it is. With its undisguised vivid brushstrokes and high-keyed, vibrant colors directly from the tube, this is a typical fauvist painting. 
Henri Matisse painted it just one year after debuting his new style at the 1905 Salon d'Autumn in Paris. (It was during that exhibition that the witty critic Louis Vauxcelles called such paintings "fauves," meaning "wild beasts," in his review for the magazine Gil Blas.) This picture still shows the influence of neo-impressionism (also sometimes called pointillism), with its short dabs of color in the lower left and on the nude herself. As the years went by, Matisse moved to a greater focus on powerful line and flat color.
Interestingly this picture was the first work by Matisse to enter an American art collection. The American painter and frame-maker George F. Of purchased it from the expatriate Mrs. Michael Stein, the sister-in-law of Gertrude Stein.
Why is it called Avarice?
"Avarice" means "extreme greed," and this work, by Fernando Mastrangelo deals with the idea of greed.
The depiction of corn-based products draws attention to Mexico’s mass cultivation of corn to meet energy needs and foreign consumer demands.
Mastrangelo uses one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone, which dates from about 1500 and symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Unchanged is the Aztec sun god Tonatiuh, who looks out from the stone’s center – his knife-like tongue is stuck out in a representation of his hunger for the human sacrifice. We can infer the image of the implacable imperial force with which the United States achieves its economic agenda in the Americas.
What does the skirt pattern represent?
 The pattern on the skirt is a reference a specific to a specific king's reign. You may have read this on the label, but "A motif on the figure's kilt depicting an elephant, whose trunk ends in a human right hand, identifies this work with the reign of the oba Esigie, who ruled from 1504 to 1550."
What is the connection between large orange cats and the words "fear" and "denial" on pendants hanging from a gold chain that is connected?
In the work of Pepon Osorio, the cats comes from the domestic aesthetic of his mother's house, as she would have kitsch objects like these stuffed cats as decoration. And the words "fear" and "denial" play as visual metaphors for the power of that which is not acknowledged. Feelings that often are present in households, or even in the Latino community of New York, but are often never addressed.
Why did the artist use cat figurines in this work?
The artist explains that these figures remind him of the sort of kitschy knick-knacks he would see around his mother's house when he would leave art school to visit.
For him, these figurines were the opposite of the "high art" that he was studying in school. So, he created a "high art" version of the tchotchkes.
Why are the skateboards placed in this particular order?
This was actually just a choice by the curator and artist based on how they looked best in this particular space. It has been installed differently when it was shown elsewhere.
(We have some images of the piece being shown in galleries where they are clustered much more closely together in a circle with them all touching.)
How does this relate to the gallery? It reminds me of Pollock.
That's a really interesting piece, and like everything else in this "Diverse Works" show, it was acquired sometime during the past 18 years, under the outgoing director.
Bidlo purposely copies the styles of famous artists who came before him in order to make us question the idea of originality. In the early 1980s, he did a whole solo show of paintings appropriating Pollock's style. It helped to make him famous.
It was probably chosen for the Museum's collection because it's a good example of the "appropriation art" movement of the 1980s -- when many artists were sampling from art or other imagery that had come before them, and putting whatever they borrowed into new contexts.
What material is this made out of?
That is actually made from plywood (the frame) and plastic (the flecked parts that you see). But we have a note here that the item is made from a recycled plastic called "origin. "
Crows picking at bodies-this is horrifying. Are they soldiers? Where is this set?
It is, isn't it? Vereshchagin painted his direct observations during the Russo-Turkish war. Turkish prisoners or war froze to death while being marched from Plevna in northern Bulgaria to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Vereshchagin watched the men collapse out of weakness. The two paintings serve as a sort of before-and-after: In the days after the tragedy, there was nobody to move the bodies off the road so passing carts and gun-carriages crushed them into the snow.
I'm interested in how it's placed next to the Anisfeld seascape. Is there a narrative to be drawn from this wall? Or is it more thematic?
This wall is devoted to Russian modern art and features thirteen paintings spanning 100 years. The diversity of their scale, subject-matter, and style is a tribute to the dramatic aesthetic and political changes taking place in Russia, and across Europe, during the late-19th and early-20th centuries. Large-scale landscapes seen from unusual perspectives were a popular genre in Russia at this time. The paintings by Vasily Vereshchagin and Boris Anisfeld both draw attention to the vastness of the Russian Empire's landscape and the powerful impact of the elements. Vereshchagin shows the ferocity and bleakness of winter in the fields of Bulgaria. In Anisfeld’s canvas, painted from the Aiou-Dagh Mountain in the Crimean Peninsula, the artist introduces a new aerial viewpoint emphasizing the clouds and reducing the battleship below to a tiny object in the vast sea. Vereshschagin's picture conveys a message about the nature of warfare. The artist witnessed the devastating Russo-Turkish war of 1877 and was deeply affected by the loss of life on both sides.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Stop by the BKM Café or BKM Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group. (Saul is temporarily closed to bring you an exciting new Brooklyn dining experience.)

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is this considered a Fauvist painting?
Yes it is. With its undisguised vivid brushstrokes and high-keyed, vibrant colors directly from the tube, this is a typical fauvist painting. 
Henri Matisse painted it just one year after debuting his new style at the 1905 Salon d'Autumn in Paris. (It was during that exhibition that the witty critic Louis Vauxcelles called such paintings "fauves," meaning "wild beasts," in his review for the magazine Gil Blas.) This picture still shows the influence of neo-impressionism (also sometimes called pointillism), with its short dabs of color in the lower left and on the nude herself. As the years went by, Matisse moved to a greater focus on powerful line and flat color.
Interestingly this picture was the first work by Matisse to enter an American art collection. The American painter and frame-maker George F. Of purchased it from the expatriate Mrs. Michael Stein, the sister-in-law of Gertrude Stein.
Why is it called Avarice?
"Avarice" means "extreme greed," and this work, by Fernando Mastrangelo deals with the idea of greed.
The depiction of corn-based products draws attention to Mexico’s mass cultivation of corn to meet energy needs and foreign consumer demands.
Mastrangelo uses one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone, which dates from about 1500 and symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Unchanged is the Aztec sun god Tonatiuh, who looks out from the stone’s center – his knife-like tongue is stuck out in a representation of his hunger for the human sacrifice. We can infer the image of the implacable imperial force with which the United States achieves its economic agenda in the Americas.
What does the skirt pattern represent?
 The pattern on the skirt is a reference a specific to a specific king's reign. You may have read this on the label, but "A motif on the figure's kilt depicting an elephant, whose trunk ends in a human right hand, identifies this work with the reign of the oba Esigie, who ruled from 1504 to 1550."
What is the connection between large orange cats and the words "fear" and "denial" on pendants hanging from a gold chain that is connected?
In the work of Pepon Osorio, the cats comes from the domestic aesthetic of his mother's house, as she would have kitsch objects like these stuffed cats as decoration. And the words "fear" and "denial" play as visual metaphors for the power of that which is not acknowledged. Feelings that often are present in households, or even in the Latino community of New York, but are often never addressed.
Why did the artist use cat figurines in this work?
The artist explains that these figures remind him of the sort of kitschy knick-knacks he would see around his mother's house when he would leave art school to visit.
For him, these figurines were the opposite of the "high art" that he was studying in school. So, he created a "high art" version of the tchotchkes.
Why are the skateboards placed in this particular order?
This was actually just a choice by the curator and artist based on how they looked best in this particular space. It has been installed differently when it was shown elsewhere.
(We have some images of the piece being shown in galleries where they are clustered much more closely together in a circle with them all touching.)
How does this relate to the gallery? It reminds me of Pollock.
That's a really interesting piece, and like everything else in this "Diverse Works" show, it was acquired sometime during the past 18 years, under the outgoing director.
Bidlo purposely copies the styles of famous artists who came before him in order to make us question the idea of originality. In the early 1980s, he did a whole solo show of paintings appropriating Pollock's style. It helped to make him famous.
It was probably chosen for the Museum's collection because it's a good example of the "appropriation art" movement of the 1980s -- when many artists were sampling from art or other imagery that had come before them, and putting whatever they borrowed into new contexts.
What material is this made out of?
That is actually made from plywood (the frame) and plastic (the flecked parts that you see). But we have a note here that the item is made from a recycled plastic called "origin. "
Crows picking at bodies-this is horrifying. Are they soldiers? Where is this set?
It is, isn't it? Vereshchagin painted his direct observations during the Russo-Turkish war. Turkish prisoners or war froze to death while being marched from Plevna in northern Bulgaria to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Vereshchagin watched the men collapse out of weakness. The two paintings serve as a sort of before-and-after: In the days after the tragedy, there was nobody to move the bodies off the road so passing carts and gun-carriages crushed them into the snow.
I'm interested in how it's placed next to the Anisfeld seascape. Is there a narrative to be drawn from this wall? Or is it more thematic?
This wall is devoted to Russian modern art and features thirteen paintings spanning 100 years. The diversity of their scale, subject-matter, and style is a tribute to the dramatic aesthetic and political changes taking place in Russia, and across Europe, during the late-19th and early-20th centuries. Large-scale landscapes seen from unusual perspectives were a popular genre in Russia at this time. The paintings by Vasily Vereshchagin and Boris Anisfeld both draw attention to the vastness of the Russian Empire's landscape and the powerful impact of the elements. Vereshchagin shows the ferocity and bleakness of winter in the fields of Bulgaria. In Anisfeld’s canvas, painted from the Aiou-Dagh Mountain in the Crimean Peninsula, the artist introduces a new aerial viewpoint emphasizing the clouds and reducing the battleship below to a tiny object in the vast sea. Vereshschagin's picture conveys a message about the nature of warfare. The artist witnessed the devastating Russo-Turkish war of 1877 and was deeply affected by the loss of life on both sides.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is this considered a Fauvist painting?
Yes it is. With its undisguised vivid brushstrokes and high-keyed, vibrant colors directly from the tube, this is a typical fauvist painting. 
Henri Matisse painted it just one year after debuting his new style at the 1905 Salon d'Autumn in Paris. (It was during that exhibition that the witty critic Louis Vauxcelles called such paintings "fauves," meaning "wild beasts," in his review for the magazine Gil Blas.) This picture still shows the influence of neo-impressionism (also sometimes called pointillism), with its short dabs of color in the lower left and on the nude herself. As the years went by, Matisse moved to a greater focus on powerful line and flat color.
Interestingly this picture was the first work by Matisse to enter an American art collection. The American painter and frame-maker George F. Of purchased it from the expatriate Mrs. Michael Stein, the sister-in-law of Gertrude Stein.
Why is it called Avarice?
"Avarice" means "extreme greed," and this work, by Fernando Mastrangelo deals with the idea of greed.
The depiction of corn-based products draws attention to Mexico’s mass cultivation of corn to meet energy needs and foreign consumer demands.
Mastrangelo uses one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone, which dates from about 1500 and symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Unchanged is the Aztec sun god Tonatiuh, who looks out from the stone’s center – his knife-like tongue is stuck out in a representation of his hunger for the human sacrifice. We can infer the image of the implacable imperial force with which the United States achieves its economic agenda in the Americas.
What does the skirt pattern represent?
 The pattern on the skirt is a reference a specific to a specific king's reign. You may have read this on the label, but "A motif on the figure's kilt depicting an elephant, whose trunk ends in a human right hand, identifies this work with the reign of the oba Esigie, who ruled from 1504 to 1550."
What is the connection between large orange cats and the words "fear" and "denial" on pendants hanging from a gold chain that is connected?
In the work of Pepon Osorio, the cats comes from the domestic aesthetic of his mother's house, as she would have kitsch objects like these stuffed cats as decoration. And the words "fear" and "denial" play as visual metaphors for the power of that which is not acknowledged. Feelings that often are present in households, or even in the Latino community of New York, but are often never addressed.
Why did the artist use cat figurines in this work?
The artist explains that these figures remind him of the sort of kitschy knick-knacks he would see around his mother's house when he would leave art school to visit.
For him, these figurines were the opposite of the "high art" that he was studying in school. So, he created a "high art" version of the tchotchkes.
Why are the skateboards placed in this particular order?
This was actually just a choice by the curator and artist based on how they looked best in this particular space. It has been installed differently when it was shown elsewhere.
(We have some images of the piece being shown in galleries where they are clustered much more closely together in a circle with them all touching.)
How does this relate to the gallery? It reminds me of Pollock.
That's a really interesting piece, and like everything else in this "Diverse Works" show, it was acquired sometime during the past 18 years, under the outgoing director.
Bidlo purposely copies the styles of famous artists who came before him in order to make us question the idea of originality. In the early 1980s, he did a whole solo show of paintings appropriating Pollock's style. It helped to make him famous.
It was probably chosen for the Museum's collection because it's a good example of the "appropriation art" movement of the 1980s -- when many artists were sampling from art or other imagery that had come before them, and putting whatever they borrowed into new contexts.
What material is this made out of?
That is actually made from plywood (the frame) and plastic (the flecked parts that you see). But we have a note here that the item is made from a recycled plastic called "origin. "
Crows picking at bodies-this is horrifying. Are they soldiers? Where is this set?
It is, isn't it? Vereshchagin painted his direct observations during the Russo-Turkish war. Turkish prisoners or war froze to death while being marched from Plevna in northern Bulgaria to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Vereshchagin watched the men collapse out of weakness. The two paintings serve as a sort of before-and-after: In the days after the tragedy, there was nobody to move the bodies off the road so passing carts and gun-carriages crushed them into the snow.
I'm interested in how it's placed next to the Anisfeld seascape. Is there a narrative to be drawn from this wall? Or is it more thematic?
This wall is devoted to Russian modern art and features thirteen paintings spanning 100 years. The diversity of their scale, subject-matter, and style is a tribute to the dramatic aesthetic and political changes taking place in Russia, and across Europe, during the late-19th and early-20th centuries. Large-scale landscapes seen from unusual perspectives were a popular genre in Russia at this time. The paintings by Vasily Vereshchagin and Boris Anisfeld both draw attention to the vastness of the Russian Empire's landscape and the powerful impact of the elements. Vereshchagin shows the ferocity and bleakness of winter in the fields of Bulgaria. In Anisfeld’s canvas, painted from the Aiou-Dagh Mountain in the Crimean Peninsula, the artist introduces a new aerial viewpoint emphasizing the clouds and reducing the battleship below to a tiny object in the vast sea. Vereshschagin's picture conveys a message about the nature of warfare. The artist witnessed the devastating Russo-Turkish war of 1877 and was deeply affected by the loss of life on both sides.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is this considered a Fauvist painting?
Yes it is. With its undisguised vivid brushstrokes and high-keyed, vibrant colors directly from the tube, this is a typical fauvist painting. 
Henri Matisse painted it just one year after debuting his new style at the 1905 Salon d'Autumn in Paris. (It was during that exhibition that the witty critic Louis Vauxcelles called such paintings "fauves," meaning "wild beasts," in his review for the magazine Gil Blas.) This picture still shows the influence of neo-impressionism (also sometimes called pointillism), with its short dabs of color in the lower left and on the nude herself. As the years went by, Matisse moved to a greater focus on powerful line and flat color.
Interestingly this picture was the first work by Matisse to enter an American art collection. The American painter and frame-maker George F. Of purchased it from the expatriate Mrs. Michael Stein, the sister-in-law of Gertrude Stein.
Why is it called Avarice?
"Avarice" means "extreme greed," and this work, by Fernando Mastrangelo deals with the idea of greed.
The depiction of corn-based products draws attention to Mexico’s mass cultivation of corn to meet energy needs and foreign consumer demands.
Mastrangelo uses one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone, which dates from about 1500 and symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Unchanged is the Aztec sun god Tonatiuh, who looks out from the stone’s center – his knife-like tongue is stuck out in a representation of his hunger for the human sacrifice. We can infer the image of the implacable imperial force with which the United States achieves its economic agenda in the Americas.
What does the skirt pattern represent?
 The pattern on the skirt is a reference a specific to a specific king's reign. You may have read this on the label, but "A motif on the figure's kilt depicting an elephant, whose trunk ends in a human right hand, identifies this work with the reign of the oba Esigie, who ruled from 1504 to 1550."
What is the connection between large orange cats and the words "fear" and "denial" on pendants hanging from a gold chain that is connected?
In the work of Pepon Osorio, the cats comes from the domestic aesthetic of his mother's house, as she would have kitsch objects like these stuffed cats as decoration. And the words "fear" and "denial" play as visual metaphors for the power of that which is not acknowledged. Feelings that often are present in households, or even in the Latino community of New York, but are often never addressed.
Why did the artist use cat figurines in this work?
The artist explains that these figures remind him of the sort of kitschy knick-knacks he would see around his mother's house when he would leave art school to visit.
For him, these figurines were the opposite of the "high art" that he was studying in school. So, he created a "high art" version of the tchotchkes.
Why are the skateboards placed in this particular order?
This was actually just a choice by the curator and artist based on how they looked best in this particular space. It has been installed differently when it was shown elsewhere.
(We have some images of the piece being shown in galleries where they are clustered much more closely together in a circle with them all touching.)
How does this relate to the gallery? It reminds me of Pollock.
That's a really interesting piece, and like everything else in this "Diverse Works" show, it was acquired sometime during the past 18 years, under the outgoing director.
Bidlo purposely copies the styles of famous artists who came before him in order to make us question the idea of originality. In the early 1980s, he did a whole solo show of paintings appropriating Pollock's style. It helped to make him famous.
It was probably chosen for the Museum's collection because it's a good example of the "appropriation art" movement of the 1980s -- when many artists were sampling from art or other imagery that had come before them, and putting whatever they borrowed into new contexts.
What material is this made out of?
That is actually made from plywood (the frame) and plastic (the flecked parts that you see). But we have a note here that the item is made from a recycled plastic called "origin. "
Crows picking at bodies-this is horrifying. Are they soldiers? Where is this set?
It is, isn't it? Vereshchagin painted his direct observations during the Russo-Turkish war. Turkish prisoners or war froze to death while being marched from Plevna in northern Bulgaria to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Vereshchagin watched the men collapse out of weakness. The two paintings serve as a sort of before-and-after: In the days after the tragedy, there was nobody to move the bodies off the road so passing carts and gun-carriages crushed them into the snow.
I'm interested in how it's placed next to the Anisfeld seascape. Is there a narrative to be drawn from this wall? Or is it more thematic?
This wall is devoted to Russian modern art and features thirteen paintings spanning 100 years. The diversity of their scale, subject-matter, and style is a tribute to the dramatic aesthetic and political changes taking place in Russia, and across Europe, during the late-19th and early-20th centuries. Large-scale landscapes seen from unusual perspectives were a popular genre in Russia at this time. The paintings by Vasily Vereshchagin and Boris Anisfeld both draw attention to the vastness of the Russian Empire's landscape and the powerful impact of the elements. Vereshchagin shows the ferocity and bleakness of winter in the fields of Bulgaria. In Anisfeld’s canvas, painted from the Aiou-Dagh Mountain in the Crimean Peninsula, the artist introduces a new aerial viewpoint emphasizing the clouds and reducing the battleship below to a tiny object in the vast sea. Vereshschagin's picture conveys a message about the nature of warfare. The artist witnessed the devastating Russo-Turkish war of 1877 and was deeply affected by the loss of life on both sides.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (Saul is temporarily closed. Stop by our BKM Café and Bowl.)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is this considered a Fauvist painting?
Yes it is. With its undisguised vivid brushstrokes and high-keyed, vibrant colors directly from the tube, this is a typical fauvist painting. 
Henri Matisse painted it just one year after debuting his new style at the 1905 Salon d'Autumn in Paris. (It was during that exhibition that the witty critic Louis Vauxcelles called such paintings "fauves," meaning "wild beasts," in his review for the magazine Gil Blas.) This picture still shows the influence of neo-impressionism (also sometimes called pointillism), with its short dabs of color in the lower left and on the nude herself. As the years went by, Matisse moved to a greater focus on powerful line and flat color.
Interestingly this picture was the first work by Matisse to enter an American art collection. The American painter and frame-maker George F. Of purchased it from the expatriate Mrs. Michael Stein, the sister-in-law of Gertrude Stein.
Why is it called Avarice?
"Avarice" means "extreme greed," and this work, by Fernando Mastrangelo deals with the idea of greed.
The depiction of corn-based products draws attention to Mexico’s mass cultivation of corn to meet energy needs and foreign consumer demands.
Mastrangelo uses one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone, which dates from about 1500 and symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Unchanged is the Aztec sun god Tonatiuh, who looks out from the stone’s center – his knife-like tongue is stuck out in a representation of his hunger for the human sacrifice. We can infer the image of the implacable imperial force with which the United States achieves its economic agenda in the Americas.
What does the skirt pattern represent?
 The pattern on the skirt is a reference a specific to a specific king's reign. You may have read this on the label, but "A motif on the figure's kilt depicting an elephant, whose trunk ends in a human right hand, identifies this work with the reign of the oba Esigie, who ruled from 1504 to 1550."
What is the connection between large orange cats and the words "fear" and "denial" on pendants hanging from a gold chain that is connected?
In the work of Pepon Osorio, the cats comes from the domestic aesthetic of his mother's house, as she would have kitsch objects like these stuffed cats as decoration. And the words "fear" and "denial" play as visual metaphors for the power of that which is not acknowledged. Feelings that often are present in households, or even in the Latino community of New York, but are often never addressed.
Why did the artist use cat figurines in this work?
The artist explains that these figures remind him of the sort of kitschy knick-knacks he would see around his mother's house when he would leave art school to visit.
For him, these figurines were the opposite of the "high art" that he was studying in school. So, he created a "high art" version of the tchotchkes.
Why are the skateboards placed in this particular order?
This was actually just a choice by the curator and artist based on how they looked best in this particular space. It has been installed differently when it was shown elsewhere.
(We have some images of the piece being shown in galleries where they are clustered much more closely together in a circle with them all touching.)
How does this relate to the gallery? It reminds me of Pollock.
That's a really interesting piece, and like everything else in this "Diverse Works" show, it was acquired sometime during the past 18 years, under the outgoing director.
Bidlo purposely copies the styles of famous artists who came before him in order to make us question the idea of originality. In the early 1980s, he did a whole solo show of paintings appropriating Pollock's style. It helped to make him famous.
It was probably chosen for the Museum's collection because it's a good example of the "appropriation art" movement of the 1980s -- when many artists were sampling from art or other imagery that had come before them, and putting whatever they borrowed into new contexts.
What material is this made out of?
That is actually made from plywood (the frame) and plastic (the flecked parts that you see). But we have a note here that the item is made from a recycled plastic called "origin. "
Crows picking at bodies-this is horrifying. Are they soldiers? Where is this set?
It is, isn't it? Vereshchagin painted his direct observations during the Russo-Turkish war. Turkish prisoners or war froze to death while being marched from Plevna in northern Bulgaria to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Vereshchagin watched the men collapse out of weakness. The two paintings serve as a sort of before-and-after: In the days after the tragedy, there was nobody to move the bodies off the road so passing carts and gun-carriages crushed them into the snow.
I'm interested in how it's placed next to the Anisfeld seascape. Is there a narrative to be drawn from this wall? Or is it more thematic?
This wall is devoted to Russian modern art and features thirteen paintings spanning 100 years. The diversity of their scale, subject-matter, and style is a tribute to the dramatic aesthetic and political changes taking place in Russia, and across Europe, during the late-19th and early-20th centuries. Large-scale landscapes seen from unusual perspectives were a popular genre in Russia at this time. The paintings by Vasily Vereshchagin and Boris Anisfeld both draw attention to the vastness of the Russian Empire's landscape and the powerful impact of the elements. Vereshchagin shows the ferocity and bleakness of winter in the fields of Bulgaria. In Anisfeld’s canvas, painted from the Aiou-Dagh Mountain in the Crimean Peninsula, the artist introduces a new aerial viewpoint emphasizing the clouds and reducing the battleship below to a tiny object in the vast sea. Vereshschagin's picture conveys a message about the nature of warfare. The artist witnessed the devastating Russo-Turkish war of 1877 and was deeply affected by the loss of life on both sides.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is this considered a Fauvist painting?
Yes it is. With its undisguised vivid brushstrokes and high-keyed, vibrant colors directly from the tube, this is a typical fauvist painting. 
Henri Matisse painted it just one year after debuting his new style at the 1905 Salon d'Autumn in Paris. (It was during that exhibition that the witty critic Louis Vauxcelles called such paintings "fauves," meaning "wild beasts," in his review for the magazine Gil Blas.) This picture still shows the influence of neo-impressionism (also sometimes called pointillism), with its short dabs of color in the lower left and on the nude herself. As the years went by, Matisse moved to a greater focus on powerful line and flat color.
Interestingly this picture was the first work by Matisse to enter an American art collection. The American painter and frame-maker George F. Of purchased it from the expatriate Mrs. Michael Stein, the sister-in-law of Gertrude Stein.
Why is it called Avarice?
"Avarice" means "extreme greed," and this work, by Fernando Mastrangelo deals with the idea of greed.
The depiction of corn-based products draws attention to Mexico’s mass cultivation of corn to meet energy needs and foreign consumer demands.
Mastrangelo uses one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone, which dates from about 1500 and symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Unchanged is the Aztec sun god Tonatiuh, who looks out from the stone’s center – his knife-like tongue is stuck out in a representation of his hunger for the human sacrifice. We can infer the image of the implacable imperial force with which the United States achieves its economic agenda in the Americas.
What does the skirt pattern represent?
 The pattern on the skirt is a reference a specific to a specific king's reign. You may have read this on the label, but "A motif on the figure's kilt depicting an elephant, whose trunk ends in a human right hand, identifies this work with the reign of the oba Esigie, who ruled from 1504 to 1550."
What is the connection between large orange cats and the words "fear" and "denial" on pendants hanging from a gold chain that is connected?
In the work of Pepon Osorio, the cats comes from the domestic aesthetic of his mother's house, as she would have kitsch objects like these stuffed cats as decoration. And the words "fear" and "denial" play as visual metaphors for the power of that which is not acknowledged. Feelings that often are present in households, or even in the Latino community of New York, but are often never addressed.
Why did the artist use cat figurines in this work?
The artist explains that these figures remind him of the sort of kitschy knick-knacks he would see around his mother's house when he would leave art school to visit.
For him, these figurines were the opposite of the "high art" that he was studying in school. So, he created a "high art" version of the tchotchkes.
Why are the skateboards placed in this particular order?
This was actually just a choice by the curator and artist based on how they looked best in this particular space. It has been installed differently when it was shown elsewhere.
(We have some images of the piece being shown in galleries where they are clustered much more closely together in a circle with them all touching.)
How does this relate to the gallery? It reminds me of Pollock.
That's a really interesting piece, and like everything else in this "Diverse Works" show, it was acquired sometime during the past 18 years, under the outgoing director.
Bidlo purposely copies the styles of famous artists who came before him in order to make us question the idea of originality. In the early 1980s, he did a whole solo show of paintings appropriating Pollock's style. It helped to make him famous.
It was probably chosen for the Museum's collection because it's a good example of the "appropriation art" movement of the 1980s -- when many artists were sampling from art or other imagery that had come before them, and putting whatever they borrowed into new contexts.
What material is this made out of?
That is actually made from plywood (the frame) and plastic (the flecked parts that you see). But we have a note here that the item is made from a recycled plastic called "origin. "
Crows picking at bodies-this is horrifying. Are they soldiers? Where is this set?
It is, isn't it? Vereshchagin painted his direct observations during the Russo-Turkish war. Turkish prisoners or war froze to death while being marched from Plevna in northern Bulgaria to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Vereshchagin watched the men collapse out of weakness. The two paintings serve as a sort of before-and-after: In the days after the tragedy, there was nobody to move the bodies off the road so passing carts and gun-carriages crushed them into the snow.
I'm interested in how it's placed next to the Anisfeld seascape. Is there a narrative to be drawn from this wall? Or is it more thematic?
This wall is devoted to Russian modern art and features thirteen paintings spanning 100 years. The diversity of their scale, subject-matter, and style is a tribute to the dramatic aesthetic and political changes taking place in Russia, and across Europe, during the late-19th and early-20th centuries. Large-scale landscapes seen from unusual perspectives were a popular genre in Russia at this time. The paintings by Vasily Vereshchagin and Boris Anisfeld both draw attention to the vastness of the Russian Empire's landscape and the powerful impact of the elements. Vereshchagin shows the ferocity and bleakness of winter in the fields of Bulgaria. In Anisfeld’s canvas, painted from the Aiou-Dagh Mountain in the Crimean Peninsula, the artist introduces a new aerial viewpoint emphasizing the clouds and reducing the battleship below to a tiny object in the vast sea. Vereshschagin's picture conveys a message about the nature of warfare. The artist witnessed the devastating Russo-Turkish war of 1877 and was deeply affected by the loss of life on both sides.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is this considered a Fauvist painting?
Yes it is. With its undisguised vivid brushstrokes and high-keyed, vibrant colors directly from the tube, this is a typical fauvist painting. 
Henri Matisse painted it just one year after debuting his new style at the 1905 Salon d'Autumn in Paris. (It was during that exhibition that the witty critic Louis Vauxcelles called such paintings "fauves," meaning "wild beasts," in his review for the magazine Gil Blas.) This picture still shows the influence of neo-impressionism (also sometimes called pointillism), with its short dabs of color in the lower left and on the nude herself. As the years went by, Matisse moved to a greater focus on powerful line and flat color.
Interestingly this picture was the first work by Matisse to enter an American art collection. The American painter and frame-maker George F. Of purchased it from the expatriate Mrs. Michael Stein, the sister-in-law of Gertrude Stein.
Why is it called Avarice?
"Avarice" means "extreme greed," and this work, by Fernando Mastrangelo deals with the idea of greed.
The depiction of corn-based products draws attention to Mexico’s mass cultivation of corn to meet energy needs and foreign consumer demands.
Mastrangelo uses one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone, which dates from about 1500 and symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Unchanged is the Aztec sun god Tonatiuh, who looks out from the stone’s center – his knife-like tongue is stuck out in a representation of his hunger for the human sacrifice. We can infer the image of the implacable imperial force with which the United States achieves its economic agenda in the Americas.
What does the skirt pattern represent?
 The pattern on the skirt is a reference a specific to a specific king's reign. You may have read this on the label, but "A motif on the figure's kilt depicting an elephant, whose trunk ends in a human right hand, identifies this work with the reign of the oba Esigie, who ruled from 1504 to 1550."
What is the connection between large orange cats and the words "fear" and "denial" on pendants hanging from a gold chain that is connected?
In the work of Pepon Osorio, the cats comes from the domestic aesthetic of his mother's house, as she would have kitsch objects like these stuffed cats as decoration. And the words "fear" and "denial" play as visual metaphors for the power of that which is not acknowledged. Feelings that often are present in households, or even in the Latino community of New York, but are often never addressed.
Why did the artist use cat figurines in this work?
The artist explains that these figures remind him of the sort of kitschy knick-knacks he would see around his mother's house when he would leave art school to visit.
For him, these figurines were the opposite of the "high art" that he was studying in school. So, he created a "high art" version of the tchotchkes.
Why are the skateboards placed in this particular order?
This was actually just a choice by the curator and artist based on how they looked best in this particular space. It has been installed differently when it was shown elsewhere.
(We have some images of the piece being shown in galleries where they are clustered much more closely together in a circle with them all touching.)
How does this relate to the gallery? It reminds me of Pollock.
That's a really interesting piece, and like everything else in this "Diverse Works" show, it was acquired sometime during the past 18 years, under the outgoing director.
Bidlo purposely copies the styles of famous artists who came before him in order to make us question the idea of originality. In the early 1980s, he did a whole solo show of paintings appropriating Pollock's style. It helped to make him famous.
It was probably chosen for the Museum's collection because it's a good example of the "appropriation art" movement of the 1980s -- when many artists were sampling from art or other imagery that had come before them, and putting whatever they borrowed into new contexts.
What material is this made out of?
That is actually made from plywood (the frame) and plastic (the flecked parts that you see). But we have a note here that the item is made from a recycled plastic called "origin. "
Crows picking at bodies-this is horrifying. Are they soldiers? Where is this set?
It is, isn't it? Vereshchagin painted his direct observations during the Russo-Turkish war. Turkish prisoners or war froze to death while being marched from Plevna in northern Bulgaria to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Vereshchagin watched the men collapse out of weakness. The two paintings serve as a sort of before-and-after: In the days after the tragedy, there was nobody to move the bodies off the road so passing carts and gun-carriages crushed them into the snow.
I'm interested in how it's placed next to the Anisfeld seascape. Is there a narrative to be drawn from this wall? Or is it more thematic?
This wall is devoted to Russian modern art and features thirteen paintings spanning 100 years. The diversity of their scale, subject-matter, and style is a tribute to the dramatic aesthetic and political changes taking place in Russia, and across Europe, during the late-19th and early-20th centuries. Large-scale landscapes seen from unusual perspectives were a popular genre in Russia at this time. The paintings by Vasily Vereshchagin and Boris Anisfeld both draw attention to the vastness of the Russian Empire's landscape and the powerful impact of the elements. Vereshchagin shows the ferocity and bleakness of winter in the fields of Bulgaria. In Anisfeld’s canvas, painted from the Aiou-Dagh Mountain in the Crimean Peninsula, the artist introduces a new aerial viewpoint emphasizing the clouds and reducing the battleship below to a tiny object in the vast sea. Vereshschagin's picture conveys a message about the nature of warfare. The artist witnessed the devastating Russo-Turkish war of 1877 and was deeply affected by the loss of life on both sides.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is this considered a Fauvist painting?
Yes it is. With its undisguised vivid brushstrokes and high-keyed, vibrant colors directly from the tube, this is a typical fauvist painting. 
Henri Matisse painted it just one year after debuting his new style at the 1905 Salon d'Autumn in Paris. (It was during that exhibition that the witty critic Louis Vauxcelles called such paintings "fauves," meaning "wild beasts," in his review for the magazine Gil Blas.) This picture still shows the influence of neo-impressionism (also sometimes called pointillism), with its short dabs of color in the lower left and on the nude herself. As the years went by, Matisse moved to a greater focus on powerful line and flat color.
Interestingly this picture was the first work by Matisse to enter an American art collection. The American painter and frame-maker George F. Of purchased it from the expatriate Mrs. Michael Stein, the sister-in-law of Gertrude Stein.
Why is it called Avarice?
"Avarice" means "extreme greed," and this work, by Fernando Mastrangelo deals with the idea of greed.
The depiction of corn-based products draws attention to Mexico’s mass cultivation of corn to meet energy needs and foreign consumer demands.
Mastrangelo uses one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone, which dates from about 1500 and symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Unchanged is the Aztec sun god Tonatiuh, who looks out from the stone’s center – his knife-like tongue is stuck out in a representation of his hunger for the human sacrifice. We can infer the image of the implacable imperial force with which the United States achieves its economic agenda in the Americas.
What does the skirt pattern represent?
 The pattern on the skirt is a reference a specific to a specific king's reign. You may have read this on the label, but "A motif on the figure's kilt depicting an elephant, whose trunk ends in a human right hand, identifies this work with the reign of the oba Esigie, who ruled from 1504 to 1550."
What is the connection between large orange cats and the words "fear" and "denial" on pendants hanging from a gold chain that is connected?
In the work of Pepon Osorio, the cats comes from the domestic aesthetic of his mother's house, as she would have kitsch objects like these stuffed cats as decoration. And the words "fear" and "denial" play as visual metaphors for the power of that which is not acknowledged. Feelings that often are present in households, or even in the Latino community of New York, but are often never addressed.
Why did the artist use cat figurines in this work?
The artist explains that these figures remind him of the sort of kitschy knick-knacks he would see around his mother's house when he would leave art school to visit.
For him, these figurines were the opposite of the "high art" that he was studying in school. So, he created a "high art" version of the tchotchkes.
Why are the skateboards placed in this particular order?
This was actually just a choice by the curator and artist based on how they looked best in this particular space. It has been installed differently when it was shown elsewhere.
(We have some images of the piece being shown in galleries where they are clustered much more closely together in a circle with them all touching.)
How does this relate to the gallery? It reminds me of Pollock.
That's a really interesting piece, and like everything else in this "Diverse Works" show, it was acquired sometime during the past 18 years, under the outgoing director.
Bidlo purposely copies the styles of famous artists who came before him in order to make us question the idea of originality. In the early 1980s, he did a whole solo show of paintings appropriating Pollock's style. It helped to make him famous.
It was probably chosen for the Museum's collection because it's a good example of the "appropriation art" movement of the 1980s -- when many artists were sampling from art or other imagery that had come before them, and putting whatever they borrowed into new contexts.
What material is this made out of?
That is actually made from plywood (the frame) and plastic (the flecked parts that you see). But we have a note here that the item is made from a recycled plastic called "origin. "
Crows picking at bodies-this is horrifying. Are they soldiers? Where is this set?
It is, isn't it? Vereshchagin painted his direct observations during the Russo-Turkish war. Turkish prisoners or war froze to death while being marched from Plevna in northern Bulgaria to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Vereshchagin watched the men collapse out of weakness. The two paintings serve as a sort of before-and-after: In the days after the tragedy, there was nobody to move the bodies off the road so passing carts and gun-carriages crushed them into the snow.
I'm interested in how it's placed next to the Anisfeld seascape. Is there a narrative to be drawn from this wall? Or is it more thematic?
This wall is devoted to Russian modern art and features thirteen paintings spanning 100 years. The diversity of their scale, subject-matter, and style is a tribute to the dramatic aesthetic and political changes taking place in Russia, and across Europe, during the late-19th and early-20th centuries. Large-scale landscapes seen from unusual perspectives were a popular genre in Russia at this time. The paintings by Vasily Vereshchagin and Boris Anisfeld both draw attention to the vastness of the Russian Empire's landscape and the powerful impact of the elements. Vereshchagin shows the ferocity and bleakness of winter in the fields of Bulgaria. In Anisfeld’s canvas, painted from the Aiou-Dagh Mountain in the Crimean Peninsula, the artist introduces a new aerial viewpoint emphasizing the clouds and reducing the battleship below to a tiny object in the vast sea. Vereshschagin's picture conveys a message about the nature of warfare. The artist witnessed the devastating Russo-Turkish war of 1877 and was deeply affected by the loss of life on both sides.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is this considered a Fauvist painting?
Yes it is. With its undisguised vivid brushstrokes and high-keyed, vibrant colors directly from the tube, this is a typical fauvist painting. 
Henri Matisse painted it just one year after debuting his new style at the 1905 Salon d'Autumn in Paris. (It was during that exhibition that the witty critic Louis Vauxcelles called such paintings "fauves," meaning "wild beasts," in his review for the magazine Gil Blas.) This picture still shows the influence of neo-impressionism (also sometimes called pointillism), with its short dabs of color in the lower left and on the nude herself. As the years went by, Matisse moved to a greater focus on powerful line and flat color.
Interestingly this picture was the first work by Matisse to enter an American art collection. The American painter and frame-maker George F. Of purchased it from the expatriate Mrs. Michael Stein, the sister-in-law of Gertrude Stein.
Why is it called Avarice?
"Avarice" means "extreme greed," and this work, by Fernando Mastrangelo deals with the idea of greed.
The depiction of corn-based products draws attention to Mexico’s mass cultivation of corn to meet energy needs and foreign consumer demands.
Mastrangelo uses one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone, which dates from about 1500 and symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Unchanged is the Aztec sun god Tonatiuh, who looks out from the stone’s center – his knife-like tongue is stuck out in a representation of his hunger for the human sacrifice. We can infer the image of the implacable imperial force with which the United States achieves its economic agenda in the Americas.
What does the skirt pattern represent?
 The pattern on the skirt is a reference a specific to a specific king's reign. You may have read this on the label, but "A motif on the figure's kilt depicting an elephant, whose trunk ends in a human right hand, identifies this work with the reign of the oba Esigie, who ruled from 1504 to 1550."
What is the connection between large orange cats and the words "fear" and "denial" on pendants hanging from a gold chain that is connected?
In the work of Pepon Osorio, the cats comes from the domestic aesthetic of his mother's house, as she would have kitsch objects like these stuffed cats as decoration. And the words "fear" and "denial" play as visual metaphors for the power of that which is not acknowledged. Feelings that often are present in households, or even in the Latino community of New York, but are often never addressed.
Why did the artist use cat figurines in this work?
The artist explains that these figures remind him of the sort of kitschy knick-knacks he would see around his mother's house when he would leave art school to visit.
For him, these figurines were the opposite of the "high art" that he was studying in school. So, he created a "high art" version of the tchotchkes.
Why are the skateboards placed in this particular order?
This was actually just a choice by the curator and artist based on how they looked best in this particular space. It has been installed differently when it was shown elsewhere.
(We have some images of the piece being shown in galleries where they are clustered much more closely together in a circle with them all touching.)
How does this relate to the gallery? It reminds me of Pollock.
That's a really interesting piece, and like everything else in this "Diverse Works" show, it was acquired sometime during the past 18 years, under the outgoing director.
Bidlo purposely copies the styles of famous artists who came before him in order to make us question the idea of originality. In the early 1980s, he did a whole solo show of paintings appropriating Pollock's style. It helped to make him famous.
It was probably chosen for the Museum's collection because it's a good example of the "appropriation art" movement of the 1980s -- when many artists were sampling from art or other imagery that had come before them, and putting whatever they borrowed into new contexts.
What material is this made out of?
That is actually made from plywood (the frame) and plastic (the flecked parts that you see). But we have a note here that the item is made from a recycled plastic called "origin. "
Crows picking at bodies-this is horrifying. Are they soldiers? Where is this set?
It is, isn't it? Vereshchagin painted his direct observations during the Russo-Turkish war. Turkish prisoners or war froze to death while being marched from Plevna in northern Bulgaria to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Vereshchagin watched the men collapse out of weakness. The two paintings serve as a sort of before-and-after: In the days after the tragedy, there was nobody to move the bodies off the road so passing carts and gun-carriages crushed them into the snow.
I'm interested in how it's placed next to the Anisfeld seascape. Is there a narrative to be drawn from this wall? Or is it more thematic?
This wall is devoted to Russian modern art and features thirteen paintings spanning 100 years. The diversity of their scale, subject-matter, and style is a tribute to the dramatic aesthetic and political changes taking place in Russia, and across Europe, during the late-19th and early-20th centuries. Large-scale landscapes seen from unusual perspectives were a popular genre in Russia at this time. The paintings by Vasily Vereshchagin and Boris Anisfeld both draw attention to the vastness of the Russian Empire's landscape and the powerful impact of the elements. Vereshchagin shows the ferocity and bleakness of winter in the fields of Bulgaria. In Anisfeld’s canvas, painted from the Aiou-Dagh Mountain in the Crimean Peninsula, the artist introduces a new aerial viewpoint emphasizing the clouds and reducing the battleship below to a tiny object in the vast sea. Vereshschagin's picture conveys a message about the nature of warfare. The artist witnessed the devastating Russo-Turkish war of 1877 and was deeply affected by the loss of life on both sides.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is this considered a Fauvist painting?
Yes it is. With its undisguised vivid brushstrokes and high-keyed, vibrant colors directly from the tube, this is a typical fauvist painting. 
Henri Matisse painted it just one year after debuting his new style at the 1905 Salon d'Autumn in Paris. (It was during that exhibition that the witty critic Louis Vauxcelles called such paintings "fauves," meaning "wild beasts," in his review for the magazine Gil Blas.) This picture still shows the influence of neo-impressionism (also sometimes called pointillism), with its short dabs of color in the lower left and on the nude herself. As the years went by, Matisse moved to a greater focus on powerful line and flat color.
Interestingly this picture was the first work by Matisse to enter an American art collection. The American painter and frame-maker George F. Of purchased it from the expatriate Mrs. Michael Stein, the sister-in-law of Gertrude Stein.
Why is it called Avarice?
"Avarice" means "extreme greed," and this work, by Fernando Mastrangelo deals with the idea of greed.
The depiction of corn-based products draws attention to Mexico’s mass cultivation of corn to meet energy needs and foreign consumer demands.
Mastrangelo uses one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone, which dates from about 1500 and symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Unchanged is the Aztec sun god Tonatiuh, who looks out from the stone’s center – his knife-like tongue is stuck out in a representation of his hunger for the human sacrifice. We can infer the image of the implacable imperial force with which the United States achieves its economic agenda in the Americas.
What does the skirt pattern represent?
 The pattern on the skirt is a reference a specific to a specific king's reign. You may have read this on the label, but "A motif on the figure's kilt depicting an elephant, whose trunk ends in a human right hand, identifies this work with the reign of the oba Esigie, who ruled from 1504 to 1550."
What is the connection between large orange cats and the words "fear" and "denial" on pendants hanging from a gold chain that is connected?
In the work of Pepon Osorio, the cats comes from the domestic aesthetic of his mother's house, as she would have kitsch objects like these stuffed cats as decoration. And the words "fear" and "denial" play as visual metaphors for the power of that which is not acknowledged. Feelings that often are present in households, or even in the Latino community of New York, but are often never addressed.
Why did the artist use cat figurines in this work?
The artist explains that these figures remind him of the sort of kitschy knick-knacks he would see around his mother's house when he would leave art school to visit.
For him, these figurines were the opposite of the "high art" that he was studying in school. So, he created a "high art" version of the tchotchkes.
Why are the skateboards placed in this particular order?
This was actually just a choice by the curator and artist based on how they looked best in this particular space. It has been installed differently when it was shown elsewhere.
(We have some images of the piece being shown in galleries where they are clustered much more closely together in a circle with them all touching.)
How does this relate to the gallery? It reminds me of Pollock.
That's a really interesting piece, and like everything else in this "Diverse Works" show, it was acquired sometime during the past 18 years, under the outgoing director.
Bidlo purposely copies the styles of famous artists who came before him in order to make us question the idea of originality. In the early 1980s, he did a whole solo show of paintings appropriating Pollock's style. It helped to make him famous.
It was probably chosen for the Museum's collection because it's a good example of the "appropriation art" movement of the 1980s -- when many artists were sampling from art or other imagery that had come before them, and putting whatever they borrowed into new contexts.
What material is this made out of?
That is actually made from plywood (the frame) and plastic (the flecked parts that you see). But we have a note here that the item is made from a recycled plastic called "origin. "
Crows picking at bodies-this is horrifying. Are they soldiers? Where is this set?
It is, isn't it? Vereshchagin painted his direct observations during the Russo-Turkish war. Turkish prisoners or war froze to death while being marched from Plevna in northern Bulgaria to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Vereshchagin watched the men collapse out of weakness. The two paintings serve as a sort of before-and-after: In the days after the tragedy, there was nobody to move the bodies off the road so passing carts and gun-carriages crushed them into the snow.
I'm interested in how it's placed next to the Anisfeld seascape. Is there a narrative to be drawn from this wall? Or is it more thematic?
This wall is devoted to Russian modern art and features thirteen paintings spanning 100 years. The diversity of their scale, subject-matter, and style is a tribute to the dramatic aesthetic and political changes taking place in Russia, and across Europe, during the late-19th and early-20th centuries. Large-scale landscapes seen from unusual perspectives were a popular genre in Russia at this time. The paintings by Vasily Vereshchagin and Boris Anisfeld both draw attention to the vastness of the Russian Empire's landscape and the powerful impact of the elements. Vereshchagin shows the ferocity and bleakness of winter in the fields of Bulgaria. In Anisfeld’s canvas, painted from the Aiou-Dagh Mountain in the Crimean Peninsula, the artist introduces a new aerial viewpoint emphasizing the clouds and reducing the battleship below to a tiny object in the vast sea. Vereshschagin's picture conveys a message about the nature of warfare. The artist witnessed the devastating Russo-Turkish war of 1877 and was deeply affected by the loss of life on both sides.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is this considered a Fauvist painting?
Yes it is. With its undisguised vivid brushstrokes and high-keyed, vibrant colors directly from the tube, this is a typical fauvist painting. 
Henri Matisse painted it just one year after debuting his new style at the 1905 Salon d'Autumn in Paris. (It was during that exhibition that the witty critic Louis Vauxcelles called such paintings "fauves," meaning "wild beasts," in his review for the magazine Gil Blas.) This picture still shows the influence of neo-impressionism (also sometimes called pointillism), with its short dabs of color in the lower left and on the nude herself. As the years went by, Matisse moved to a greater focus on powerful line and flat color.
Interestingly this picture was the first work by Matisse to enter an American art collection. The American painter and frame-maker George F. Of purchased it from the expatriate Mrs. Michael Stein, the sister-in-law of Gertrude Stein.
Why is it called Avarice?
"Avarice" means "extreme greed," and this work, by Fernando Mastrangelo deals with the idea of greed.
The depiction of corn-based products draws attention to Mexico’s mass cultivation of corn to meet energy needs and foreign consumer demands.
Mastrangelo uses one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone, which dates from about 1500 and symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Unchanged is the Aztec sun god Tonatiuh, who looks out from the stone’s center – his knife-like tongue is stuck out in a representation of his hunger for the human sacrifice. We can infer the image of the implacable imperial force with which the United States achieves its economic agenda in the Americas.
What does the skirt pattern represent?
 The pattern on the skirt is a reference a specific to a specific king's reign. You may have read this on the label, but "A motif on the figure's kilt depicting an elephant, whose trunk ends in a human right hand, identifies this work with the reign of the oba Esigie, who ruled from 1504 to 1550."
What is the connection between large orange cats and the words "fear" and "denial" on pendants hanging from a gold chain that is connected?
In the work of Pepon Osorio, the cats comes from the domestic aesthetic of his mother's house, as she would have kitsch objects like these stuffed cats as decoration. And the words "fear" and "denial" play as visual metaphors for the power of that which is not acknowledged. Feelings that often are present in households, or even in the Latino community of New York, but are often never addressed.
Why did the artist use cat figurines in this work?
The artist explains that these figures remind him of the sort of kitschy knick-knacks he would see around his mother's house when he would leave art school to visit.
For him, these figurines were the opposite of the "high art" that he was studying in school. So, he created a "high art" version of the tchotchkes.
Why are the skateboards placed in this particular order?
This was actually just a choice by the curator and artist based on how they looked best in this particular space. It has been installed differently when it was shown elsewhere.
(We have some images of the piece being shown in galleries where they are clustered much more closely together in a circle with them all touching.)
How does this relate to the gallery? It reminds me of Pollock.
That's a really interesting piece, and like everything else in this "Diverse Works" show, it was acquired sometime during the past 18 years, under the outgoing director.
Bidlo purposely copies the styles of famous artists who came before him in order to make us question the idea of originality. In the early 1980s, he did a whole solo show of paintings appropriating Pollock's style. It helped to make him famous.
It was probably chosen for the Museum's collection because it's a good example of the "appropriation art" movement of the 1980s -- when many artists were sampling from art or other imagery that had come before them, and putting whatever they borrowed into new contexts.
What material is this made out of?
That is actually made from plywood (the frame) and plastic (the flecked parts that you see). But we have a note here that the item is made from a recycled plastic called "origin. "
Crows picking at bodies-this is horrifying. Are they soldiers? Where is this set?
It is, isn't it? Vereshchagin painted his direct observations during the Russo-Turkish war. Turkish prisoners or war froze to death while being marched from Plevna in northern Bulgaria to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Vereshchagin watched the men collapse out of weakness. The two paintings serve as a sort of before-and-after: In the days after the tragedy, there was nobody to move the bodies off the road so passing carts and gun-carriages crushed them into the snow.
I'm interested in how it's placed next to the Anisfeld seascape. Is there a narrative to be drawn from this wall? Or is it more thematic?
This wall is devoted to Russian modern art and features thirteen paintings spanning 100 years. The diversity of their scale, subject-matter, and style is a tribute to the dramatic aesthetic and political changes taking place in Russia, and across Europe, during the late-19th and early-20th centuries. Large-scale landscapes seen from unusual perspectives were a popular genre in Russia at this time. The paintings by Vasily Vereshchagin and Boris Anisfeld both draw attention to the vastness of the Russian Empire's landscape and the powerful impact of the elements. Vereshchagin shows the ferocity and bleakness of winter in the fields of Bulgaria. In Anisfeld’s canvas, painted from the Aiou-Dagh Mountain in the Crimean Peninsula, the artist introduces a new aerial viewpoint emphasizing the clouds and reducing the battleship below to a tiny object in the vast sea. Vereshschagin's picture conveys a message about the nature of warfare. The artist witnessed the devastating Russo-Turkish war of 1877 and was deeply affected by the loss of life on both sides.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.