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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
What is the difference between this & Coptic art?
"Coptic" comes from the Greek word "Aigyptos" which means "Egypt." In art historical terms, "Coptic" is used to refer to Egyptian art created during the period of Roman and Byzantine occupation when Christianity was most prominent in Egypt. So the Coptic period itself begins later than when this piece was created; the Coptic period, according to art historians, begins around the 3rd century CE.
I've always wondered about these different faces in one statue.
In representations of Buddhist deities, each face shows a different ability or characteristic.
Marichi can be either peaceful or angry. That is the reason for the front-facing calm face, and the fierce face. And the symbol of a boar on one face represents determination.
This one is the goddess of dawn.
What do the three faces represent?
I am not sure that the three faces represent anything necessarily but we do know that much of Edwin and Mary Scheier's work (they were married and both created pottery) showed people-within-people or figures in womb-like shapes. They often use symbols of birth and the cycles of life in their art. They were also inspired by Chinese art, I don't know enough about Chinese art and motifs to say for sure, but possibly this was something that comes out of that inspiration. And here's an interesting fact: they first worked together as puppeteers, before they began collaborating on pottery!
Very powerful! What war is depicted here?
These paintings were from the Russo-Turkish war that took place in the late 1870s.
Vereshchagin also observed a lot of Russian military activity in Central Asia. He was a military staff artist from 1867-1870. What I find most interesting though is that his portrayals didn't show how great and powerful Russia was; his view was objectively about the horror and pain of war, irrespective of which side you're on.
Why is this ombré? Was it to do with fire of some sort?
Yes, it's been blackened by smoke, though the date of the fire is unknown.
How does the iconography/style reflect the early Renaissance movements?
You can see that it still incorporates silver and gold from medieval iconography, but is adding a sense of realism to the faces of the figures. It shows not only the graceful linear forms that characterize Sienese painting, but also the powerful effect of Florentine realism in the pliant muscularity of the Child and the sense of observed reality in the head of the Madonna.
Sano’s active workshop was the principal source in Siena for devotional images of the Madonna and Child.
Interesting. And then it continues the medieval style of having similar facial expressions on the figures depicted?
Yes, the facial expressions are still pretty static especially when you compare them to later Renaissance painting.
I find the contrast of the colors - the Virgin's cloak and Christ child's skin - so striking. It really gives the figures a sense of other-worldliness.The relationship of the figure to the frame is also innovative. The Madonna and child appear to hover before the arch of the frame by design as the frame was an integral part of the work (known as an engaged frame). By appearing to float in the viewer’s space, the Madonna and Child achieve a greater sense of tangibility and accessibility. This is in keeping with the Madonna seated on the ground theme (Madonna of Humility), which evokes a caring and humble mother.
Why are these two paired up?
They're paired to point out the cross-cultural dialogue that's taking place. For example, notice the woman's wardrobe in William Merritt Chase's painting. She's wearing a Japanese kimono, showing the late 19th century American interest in Asian arts and culture after trade was reestablished between the Western world and Japan for the first time in more than two hundred years."
Who are these people?
This plaque was from a really interesting time in Ancient Egyptian history, known as the Amarna period.
The figure on the left, Akhenaten completely changed the official religion in Egypt during his reign, excluding all the gods except Aten, a new sun god, who he built lavish temples for. He also significantly changed the way he as king was represented compared with previous rulers. Let me know if you have any questions in the Amarna galleries.
This feels like the 90's. Where did graffiti art originate and why?
This work is from 1984 but the 80s style of street art definitely carried over into the culture of the 90s.
In the early 1980s, graffiti art was a new trend among contemporary art collectors, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Graffiti comes from the Italian word "graffito" and was used to signify writings or scratching on walls. Writing on walls has been popular since ancient times (examples exist in Greece, Rome and Egypt). You can even see some ancient graffiti in the Mummy Chamber on the third floor of this museum! 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
What is the difference between this & Coptic art?
"Coptic" comes from the Greek word "Aigyptos" which means "Egypt." In art historical terms, "Coptic" is used to refer to Egyptian art created during the period of Roman and Byzantine occupation when Christianity was most prominent in Egypt. So the Coptic period itself begins later than when this piece was created; the Coptic period, according to art historians, begins around the 3rd century CE.
I've always wondered about these different faces in one statue.
In representations of Buddhist deities, each face shows a different ability or characteristic.
Marichi can be either peaceful or angry. That is the reason for the front-facing calm face, and the fierce face. And the symbol of a boar on one face represents determination.
This one is the goddess of dawn.
What do the three faces represent?
I am not sure that the three faces represent anything necessarily but we do know that much of Edwin and Mary Scheier's work (they were married and both created pottery) showed people-within-people or figures in womb-like shapes. They often use symbols of birth and the cycles of life in their art. They were also inspired by Chinese art, I don't know enough about Chinese art and motifs to say for sure, but possibly this was something that comes out of that inspiration. And here's an interesting fact: they first worked together as puppeteers, before they began collaborating on pottery!
Very powerful! What war is depicted here?
These paintings were from the Russo-Turkish war that took place in the late 1870s.
Vereshchagin also observed a lot of Russian military activity in Central Asia. He was a military staff artist from 1867-1870. What I find most interesting though is that his portrayals didn't show how great and powerful Russia was; his view was objectively about the horror and pain of war, irrespective of which side you're on.
Why is this ombré? Was it to do with fire of some sort?
Yes, it's been blackened by smoke, though the date of the fire is unknown.
How does the iconography/style reflect the early Renaissance movements?
You can see that it still incorporates silver and gold from medieval iconography, but is adding a sense of realism to the faces of the figures. It shows not only the graceful linear forms that characterize Sienese painting, but also the powerful effect of Florentine realism in the pliant muscularity of the Child and the sense of observed reality in the head of the Madonna.
Sano’s active workshop was the principal source in Siena for devotional images of the Madonna and Child.
Interesting. And then it continues the medieval style of having similar facial expressions on the figures depicted?
Yes, the facial expressions are still pretty static especially when you compare them to later Renaissance painting.
I find the contrast of the colors - the Virgin's cloak and Christ child's skin - so striking. It really gives the figures a sense of other-worldliness.The relationship of the figure to the frame is also innovative. The Madonna and child appear to hover before the arch of the frame by design as the frame was an integral part of the work (known as an engaged frame). By appearing to float in the viewer’s space, the Madonna and Child achieve a greater sense of tangibility and accessibility. This is in keeping with the Madonna seated on the ground theme (Madonna of Humility), which evokes a caring and humble mother.
Why are these two paired up?
They're paired to point out the cross-cultural dialogue that's taking place. For example, notice the woman's wardrobe in William Merritt Chase's painting. She's wearing a Japanese kimono, showing the late 19th century American interest in Asian arts and culture after trade was reestablished between the Western world and Japan for the first time in more than two hundred years."
Who are these people?
This plaque was from a really interesting time in Ancient Egyptian history, known as the Amarna period.
The figure on the left, Akhenaten completely changed the official religion in Egypt during his reign, excluding all the gods except Aten, a new sun god, who he built lavish temples for. He also significantly changed the way he as king was represented compared with previous rulers. Let me know if you have any questions in the Amarna galleries.
This feels like the 90's. Where did graffiti art originate and why?
This work is from 1984 but the 80s style of street art definitely carried over into the culture of the 90s.
In the early 1980s, graffiti art was a new trend among contemporary art collectors, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Graffiti comes from the Italian word "graffito" and was used to signify writings or scratching on walls. Writing on walls has been popular since ancient times (examples exist in Greece, Rome and Egypt). You can even see some ancient graffiti in the Mummy Chamber on the third floor of this museum! 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
What is the difference between this & Coptic art?
"Coptic" comes from the Greek word "Aigyptos" which means "Egypt." In art historical terms, "Coptic" is used to refer to Egyptian art created during the period of Roman and Byzantine occupation when Christianity was most prominent in Egypt. So the Coptic period itself begins later than when this piece was created; the Coptic period, according to art historians, begins around the 3rd century CE.
I've always wondered about these different faces in one statue.
In representations of Buddhist deities, each face shows a different ability or characteristic.
Marichi can be either peaceful or angry. That is the reason for the front-facing calm face, and the fierce face. And the symbol of a boar on one face represents determination.
This one is the goddess of dawn.
What do the three faces represent?
I am not sure that the three faces represent anything necessarily but we do know that much of Edwin and Mary Scheier's work (they were married and both created pottery) showed people-within-people or figures in womb-like shapes. They often use symbols of birth and the cycles of life in their art. They were also inspired by Chinese art, I don't know enough about Chinese art and motifs to say for sure, but possibly this was something that comes out of that inspiration. And here's an interesting fact: they first worked together as puppeteers, before they began collaborating on pottery!
Very powerful! What war is depicted here?
These paintings were from the Russo-Turkish war that took place in the late 1870s.
Vereshchagin also observed a lot of Russian military activity in Central Asia. He was a military staff artist from 1867-1870. What I find most interesting though is that his portrayals didn't show how great and powerful Russia was; his view was objectively about the horror and pain of war, irrespective of which side you're on.
Why is this ombré? Was it to do with fire of some sort?
Yes, it's been blackened by smoke, though the date of the fire is unknown.
How does the iconography/style reflect the early Renaissance movements?
You can see that it still incorporates silver and gold from medieval iconography, but is adding a sense of realism to the faces of the figures. It shows not only the graceful linear forms that characterize Sienese painting, but also the powerful effect of Florentine realism in the pliant muscularity of the Child and the sense of observed reality in the head of the Madonna.
Sano’s active workshop was the principal source in Siena for devotional images of the Madonna and Child.
Interesting. And then it continues the medieval style of having similar facial expressions on the figures depicted?
Yes, the facial expressions are still pretty static especially when you compare them to later Renaissance painting.
I find the contrast of the colors - the Virgin's cloak and Christ child's skin - so striking. It really gives the figures a sense of other-worldliness.The relationship of the figure to the frame is also innovative. The Madonna and child appear to hover before the arch of the frame by design as the frame was an integral part of the work (known as an engaged frame). By appearing to float in the viewer’s space, the Madonna and Child achieve a greater sense of tangibility and accessibility. This is in keeping with the Madonna seated on the ground theme (Madonna of Humility), which evokes a caring and humble mother.
Why are these two paired up?
They're paired to point out the cross-cultural dialogue that's taking place. For example, notice the woman's wardrobe in William Merritt Chase's painting. She's wearing a Japanese kimono, showing the late 19th century American interest in Asian arts and culture after trade was reestablished between the Western world and Japan for the first time in more than two hundred years."
Who are these people?
This plaque was from a really interesting time in Ancient Egyptian history, known as the Amarna period.
The figure on the left, Akhenaten completely changed the official religion in Egypt during his reign, excluding all the gods except Aten, a new sun god, who he built lavish temples for. He also significantly changed the way he as king was represented compared with previous rulers. Let me know if you have any questions in the Amarna galleries.
This feels like the 90's. Where did graffiti art originate and why?
This work is from 1984 but the 80s style of street art definitely carried over into the culture of the 90s.
In the early 1980s, graffiti art was a new trend among contemporary art collectors, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Graffiti comes from the Italian word "graffito" and was used to signify writings or scratching on walls. Writing on walls has been popular since ancient times (examples exist in Greece, Rome and Egypt). You can even see some ancient graffiti in the Mummy Chamber on the third floor of this museum! 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until fall 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
What is the difference between this & Coptic art?
"Coptic" comes from the Greek word "Aigyptos" which means "Egypt." In art historical terms, "Coptic" is used to refer to Egyptian art created during the period of Roman and Byzantine occupation when Christianity was most prominent in Egypt. So the Coptic period itself begins later than when this piece was created; the Coptic period, according to art historians, begins around the 3rd century CE.
I've always wondered about these different faces in one statue.
In representations of Buddhist deities, each face shows a different ability or characteristic.
Marichi can be either peaceful or angry. That is the reason for the front-facing calm face, and the fierce face. And the symbol of a boar on one face represents determination.
This one is the goddess of dawn.
What do the three faces represent?
I am not sure that the three faces represent anything necessarily but we do know that much of Edwin and Mary Scheier's work (they were married and both created pottery) showed people-within-people or figures in womb-like shapes. They often use symbols of birth and the cycles of life in their art. They were also inspired by Chinese art, I don't know enough about Chinese art and motifs to say for sure, but possibly this was something that comes out of that inspiration. And here's an interesting fact: they first worked together as puppeteers, before they began collaborating on pottery!
Very powerful! What war is depicted here?
These paintings were from the Russo-Turkish war that took place in the late 1870s.
Vereshchagin also observed a lot of Russian military activity in Central Asia. He was a military staff artist from 1867-1870. What I find most interesting though is that his portrayals didn't show how great and powerful Russia was; his view was objectively about the horror and pain of war, irrespective of which side you're on.
Why is this ombré? Was it to do with fire of some sort?
Yes, it's been blackened by smoke, though the date of the fire is unknown.
How does the iconography/style reflect the early Renaissance movements?
You can see that it still incorporates silver and gold from medieval iconography, but is adding a sense of realism to the faces of the figures. It shows not only the graceful linear forms that characterize Sienese painting, but also the powerful effect of Florentine realism in the pliant muscularity of the Child and the sense of observed reality in the head of the Madonna.
Sano’s active workshop was the principal source in Siena for devotional images of the Madonna and Child.
Interesting. And then it continues the medieval style of having similar facial expressions on the figures depicted?
Yes, the facial expressions are still pretty static especially when you compare them to later Renaissance painting.
I find the contrast of the colors - the Virgin's cloak and Christ child's skin - so striking. It really gives the figures a sense of other-worldliness.The relationship of the figure to the frame is also innovative. The Madonna and child appear to hover before the arch of the frame by design as the frame was an integral part of the work (known as an engaged frame). By appearing to float in the viewer’s space, the Madonna and Child achieve a greater sense of tangibility and accessibility. This is in keeping with the Madonna seated on the ground theme (Madonna of Humility), which evokes a caring and humble mother.
Why are these two paired up?
They're paired to point out the cross-cultural dialogue that's taking place. For example, notice the woman's wardrobe in William Merritt Chase's painting. She's wearing a Japanese kimono, showing the late 19th century American interest in Asian arts and culture after trade was reestablished between the Western world and Japan for the first time in more than two hundred years."
Who are these people?
This plaque was from a really interesting time in Ancient Egyptian history, known as the Amarna period.
The figure on the left, Akhenaten completely changed the official religion in Egypt during his reign, excluding all the gods except Aten, a new sun god, who he built lavish temples for. He also significantly changed the way he as king was represented compared with previous rulers. Let me know if you have any questions in the Amarna galleries.
This feels like the 90's. Where did graffiti art originate and why?
This work is from 1984 but the 80s style of street art definitely carried over into the culture of the 90s.
In the early 1980s, graffiti art was a new trend among contemporary art collectors, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Graffiti comes from the Italian word "graffito" and was used to signify writings or scratching on walls. Writing on walls has been popular since ancient times (examples exist in Greece, Rome and Egypt). You can even see some ancient graffiti in the Mummy Chamber on the third floor of this museum! 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
What is the difference between this & Coptic art?
"Coptic" comes from the Greek word "Aigyptos" which means "Egypt." In art historical terms, "Coptic" is used to refer to Egyptian art created during the period of Roman and Byzantine occupation when Christianity was most prominent in Egypt. So the Coptic period itself begins later than when this piece was created; the Coptic period, according to art historians, begins around the 3rd century CE.
I've always wondered about these different faces in one statue.
In representations of Buddhist deities, each face shows a different ability or characteristic.
Marichi can be either peaceful or angry. That is the reason for the front-facing calm face, and the fierce face. And the symbol of a boar on one face represents determination.
This one is the goddess of dawn.
What do the three faces represent?
I am not sure that the three faces represent anything necessarily but we do know that much of Edwin and Mary Scheier's work (they were married and both created pottery) showed people-within-people or figures in womb-like shapes. They often use symbols of birth and the cycles of life in their art. They were also inspired by Chinese art, I don't know enough about Chinese art and motifs to say for sure, but possibly this was something that comes out of that inspiration. And here's an interesting fact: they first worked together as puppeteers, before they began collaborating on pottery!
Very powerful! What war is depicted here?
These paintings were from the Russo-Turkish war that took place in the late 1870s.
Vereshchagin also observed a lot of Russian military activity in Central Asia. He was a military staff artist from 1867-1870. What I find most interesting though is that his portrayals didn't show how great and powerful Russia was; his view was objectively about the horror and pain of war, irrespective of which side you're on.
Why is this ombré? Was it to do with fire of some sort?
Yes, it's been blackened by smoke, though the date of the fire is unknown.
How does the iconography/style reflect the early Renaissance movements?
You can see that it still incorporates silver and gold from medieval iconography, but is adding a sense of realism to the faces of the figures. It shows not only the graceful linear forms that characterize Sienese painting, but also the powerful effect of Florentine realism in the pliant muscularity of the Child and the sense of observed reality in the head of the Madonna.
Sano’s active workshop was the principal source in Siena for devotional images of the Madonna and Child.
Interesting. And then it continues the medieval style of having similar facial expressions on the figures depicted?
Yes, the facial expressions are still pretty static especially when you compare them to later Renaissance painting.
I find the contrast of the colors - the Virgin's cloak and Christ child's skin - so striking. It really gives the figures a sense of other-worldliness.The relationship of the figure to the frame is also innovative. The Madonna and child appear to hover before the arch of the frame by design as the frame was an integral part of the work (known as an engaged frame). By appearing to float in the viewer’s space, the Madonna and Child achieve a greater sense of tangibility and accessibility. This is in keeping with the Madonna seated on the ground theme (Madonna of Humility), which evokes a caring and humble mother.
Why are these two paired up?
They're paired to point out the cross-cultural dialogue that's taking place. For example, notice the woman's wardrobe in William Merritt Chase's painting. She's wearing a Japanese kimono, showing the late 19th century American interest in Asian arts and culture after trade was reestablished between the Western world and Japan for the first time in more than two hundred years."
Who are these people?
This plaque was from a really interesting time in Ancient Egyptian history, known as the Amarna period.
The figure on the left, Akhenaten completely changed the official religion in Egypt during his reign, excluding all the gods except Aten, a new sun god, who he built lavish temples for. He also significantly changed the way he as king was represented compared with previous rulers. Let me know if you have any questions in the Amarna galleries.
This feels like the 90's. Where did graffiti art originate and why?
This work is from 1984 but the 80s style of street art definitely carried over into the culture of the 90s.
In the early 1980s, graffiti art was a new trend among contemporary art collectors, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Graffiti comes from the Italian word "graffito" and was used to signify writings or scratching on walls. Writing on walls has been popular since ancient times (examples exist in Greece, Rome and Egypt). You can even see some ancient graffiti in the Mummy Chamber on the third floor of this museum! 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
What is the difference between this & Coptic art?
"Coptic" comes from the Greek word "Aigyptos" which means "Egypt." In art historical terms, "Coptic" is used to refer to Egyptian art created during the period of Roman and Byzantine occupation when Christianity was most prominent in Egypt. So the Coptic period itself begins later than when this piece was created; the Coptic period, according to art historians, begins around the 3rd century CE.
I've always wondered about these different faces in one statue.
In representations of Buddhist deities, each face shows a different ability or characteristic.
Marichi can be either peaceful or angry. That is the reason for the front-facing calm face, and the fierce face. And the symbol of a boar on one face represents determination.
This one is the goddess of dawn.
What do the three faces represent?
I am not sure that the three faces represent anything necessarily but we do know that much of Edwin and Mary Scheier's work (they were married and both created pottery) showed people-within-people or figures in womb-like shapes. They often use symbols of birth and the cycles of life in their art. They were also inspired by Chinese art, I don't know enough about Chinese art and motifs to say for sure, but possibly this was something that comes out of that inspiration. And here's an interesting fact: they first worked together as puppeteers, before they began collaborating on pottery!
Very powerful! What war is depicted here?
These paintings were from the Russo-Turkish war that took place in the late 1870s.
Vereshchagin also observed a lot of Russian military activity in Central Asia. He was a military staff artist from 1867-1870. What I find most interesting though is that his portrayals didn't show how great and powerful Russia was; his view was objectively about the horror and pain of war, irrespective of which side you're on.
Why is this ombré? Was it to do with fire of some sort?
Yes, it's been blackened by smoke, though the date of the fire is unknown.
How does the iconography/style reflect the early Renaissance movements?
You can see that it still incorporates silver and gold from medieval iconography, but is adding a sense of realism to the faces of the figures. It shows not only the graceful linear forms that characterize Sienese painting, but also the powerful effect of Florentine realism in the pliant muscularity of the Child and the sense of observed reality in the head of the Madonna.
Sano’s active workshop was the principal source in Siena for devotional images of the Madonna and Child.
Interesting. And then it continues the medieval style of having similar facial expressions on the figures depicted?
Yes, the facial expressions are still pretty static especially when you compare them to later Renaissance painting.
I find the contrast of the colors - the Virgin's cloak and Christ child's skin - so striking. It really gives the figures a sense of other-worldliness.The relationship of the figure to the frame is also innovative. The Madonna and child appear to hover before the arch of the frame by design as the frame was an integral part of the work (known as an engaged frame). By appearing to float in the viewer’s space, the Madonna and Child achieve a greater sense of tangibility and accessibility. This is in keeping with the Madonna seated on the ground theme (Madonna of Humility), which evokes a caring and humble mother.
Why are these two paired up?
They're paired to point out the cross-cultural dialogue that's taking place. For example, notice the woman's wardrobe in William Merritt Chase's painting. She's wearing a Japanese kimono, showing the late 19th century American interest in Asian arts and culture after trade was reestablished between the Western world and Japan for the first time in more than two hundred years."
Who are these people?
This plaque was from a really interesting time in Ancient Egyptian history, known as the Amarna period.
The figure on the left, Akhenaten completely changed the official religion in Egypt during his reign, excluding all the gods except Aten, a new sun god, who he built lavish temples for. He also significantly changed the way he as king was represented compared with previous rulers. Let me know if you have any questions in the Amarna galleries.
This feels like the 90's. Where did graffiti art originate and why?
This work is from 1984 but the 80s style of street art definitely carried over into the culture of the 90s.
In the early 1980s, graffiti art was a new trend among contemporary art collectors, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Graffiti comes from the Italian word "graffito" and was used to signify writings or scratching on walls. Writing on walls has been popular since ancient times (examples exist in Greece, Rome and Egypt). You can even see some ancient graffiti in the Mummy Chamber on the third floor of this museum! 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
What is the difference between this & Coptic art?
"Coptic" comes from the Greek word "Aigyptos" which means "Egypt." In art historical terms, "Coptic" is used to refer to Egyptian art created during the period of Roman and Byzantine occupation when Christianity was most prominent in Egypt. So the Coptic period itself begins later than when this piece was created; the Coptic period, according to art historians, begins around the 3rd century CE.
I've always wondered about these different faces in one statue.
In representations of Buddhist deities, each face shows a different ability or characteristic.
Marichi can be either peaceful or angry. That is the reason for the front-facing calm face, and the fierce face. And the symbol of a boar on one face represents determination.
This one is the goddess of dawn.
What do the three faces represent?
I am not sure that the three faces represent anything necessarily but we do know that much of Edwin and Mary Scheier's work (they were married and both created pottery) showed people-within-people or figures in womb-like shapes. They often use symbols of birth and the cycles of life in their art. They were also inspired by Chinese art, I don't know enough about Chinese art and motifs to say for sure, but possibly this was something that comes out of that inspiration. And here's an interesting fact: they first worked together as puppeteers, before they began collaborating on pottery!
Very powerful! What war is depicted here?
These paintings were from the Russo-Turkish war that took place in the late 1870s.
Vereshchagin also observed a lot of Russian military activity in Central Asia. He was a military staff artist from 1867-1870. What I find most interesting though is that his portrayals didn't show how great and powerful Russia was; his view was objectively about the horror and pain of war, irrespective of which side you're on.
Why is this ombré? Was it to do with fire of some sort?
Yes, it's been blackened by smoke, though the date of the fire is unknown.
How does the iconography/style reflect the early Renaissance movements?
You can see that it still incorporates silver and gold from medieval iconography, but is adding a sense of realism to the faces of the figures. It shows not only the graceful linear forms that characterize Sienese painting, but also the powerful effect of Florentine realism in the pliant muscularity of the Child and the sense of observed reality in the head of the Madonna.
Sano’s active workshop was the principal source in Siena for devotional images of the Madonna and Child.
Interesting. And then it continues the medieval style of having similar facial expressions on the figures depicted?
Yes, the facial expressions are still pretty static especially when you compare them to later Renaissance painting.
I find the contrast of the colors - the Virgin's cloak and Christ child's skin - so striking. It really gives the figures a sense of other-worldliness.The relationship of the figure to the frame is also innovative. The Madonna and child appear to hover before the arch of the frame by design as the frame was an integral part of the work (known as an engaged frame). By appearing to float in the viewer’s space, the Madonna and Child achieve a greater sense of tangibility and accessibility. This is in keeping with the Madonna seated on the ground theme (Madonna of Humility), which evokes a caring and humble mother.
Why are these two paired up?
They're paired to point out the cross-cultural dialogue that's taking place. For example, notice the woman's wardrobe in William Merritt Chase's painting. She's wearing a Japanese kimono, showing the late 19th century American interest in Asian arts and culture after trade was reestablished between the Western world and Japan for the first time in more than two hundred years."
Who are these people?
This plaque was from a really interesting time in Ancient Egyptian history, known as the Amarna period.
The figure on the left, Akhenaten completely changed the official religion in Egypt during his reign, excluding all the gods except Aten, a new sun god, who he built lavish temples for. He also significantly changed the way he as king was represented compared with previous rulers. Let me know if you have any questions in the Amarna galleries.
This feels like the 90's. Where did graffiti art originate and why?
This work is from 1984 but the 80s style of street art definitely carried over into the culture of the 90s.
In the early 1980s, graffiti art was a new trend among contemporary art collectors, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Graffiti comes from the Italian word "graffito" and was used to signify writings or scratching on walls. Writing on walls has been popular since ancient times (examples exist in Greece, Rome and Egypt). You can even see some ancient graffiti in the Mummy Chamber on the third floor of this museum! 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
What is the difference between this & Coptic art?
"Coptic" comes from the Greek word "Aigyptos" which means "Egypt." In art historical terms, "Coptic" is used to refer to Egyptian art created during the period of Roman and Byzantine occupation when Christianity was most prominent in Egypt. So the Coptic period itself begins later than when this piece was created; the Coptic period, according to art historians, begins around the 3rd century CE.
I've always wondered about these different faces in one statue.
In representations of Buddhist deities, each face shows a different ability or characteristic.
Marichi can be either peaceful or angry. That is the reason for the front-facing calm face, and the fierce face. And the symbol of a boar on one face represents determination.
This one is the goddess of dawn.
What do the three faces represent?
I am not sure that the three faces represent anything necessarily but we do know that much of Edwin and Mary Scheier's work (they were married and both created pottery) showed people-within-people or figures in womb-like shapes. They often use symbols of birth and the cycles of life in their art. They were also inspired by Chinese art, I don't know enough about Chinese art and motifs to say for sure, but possibly this was something that comes out of that inspiration. And here's an interesting fact: they first worked together as puppeteers, before they began collaborating on pottery!
Very powerful! What war is depicted here?
These paintings were from the Russo-Turkish war that took place in the late 1870s.
Vereshchagin also observed a lot of Russian military activity in Central Asia. He was a military staff artist from 1867-1870. What I find most interesting though is that his portrayals didn't show how great and powerful Russia was; his view was objectively about the horror and pain of war, irrespective of which side you're on.
Why is this ombré? Was it to do with fire of some sort?
Yes, it's been blackened by smoke, though the date of the fire is unknown.
How does the iconography/style reflect the early Renaissance movements?
You can see that it still incorporates silver and gold from medieval iconography, but is adding a sense of realism to the faces of the figures. It shows not only the graceful linear forms that characterize Sienese painting, but also the powerful effect of Florentine realism in the pliant muscularity of the Child and the sense of observed reality in the head of the Madonna.
Sano’s active workshop was the principal source in Siena for devotional images of the Madonna and Child.
Interesting. And then it continues the medieval style of having similar facial expressions on the figures depicted?
Yes, the facial expressions are still pretty static especially when you compare them to later Renaissance painting.
I find the contrast of the colors - the Virgin's cloak and Christ child's skin - so striking. It really gives the figures a sense of other-worldliness.The relationship of the figure to the frame is also innovative. The Madonna and child appear to hover before the arch of the frame by design as the frame was an integral part of the work (known as an engaged frame). By appearing to float in the viewer’s space, the Madonna and Child achieve a greater sense of tangibility and accessibility. This is in keeping with the Madonna seated on the ground theme (Madonna of Humility), which evokes a caring and humble mother.
Why are these two paired up?
They're paired to point out the cross-cultural dialogue that's taking place. For example, notice the woman's wardrobe in William Merritt Chase's painting. She's wearing a Japanese kimono, showing the late 19th century American interest in Asian arts and culture after trade was reestablished between the Western world and Japan for the first time in more than two hundred years."
Who are these people?
This plaque was from a really interesting time in Ancient Egyptian history, known as the Amarna period.
The figure on the left, Akhenaten completely changed the official religion in Egypt during his reign, excluding all the gods except Aten, a new sun god, who he built lavish temples for. He also significantly changed the way he as king was represented compared with previous rulers. Let me know if you have any questions in the Amarna galleries.
This feels like the 90's. Where did graffiti art originate and why?
This work is from 1984 but the 80s style of street art definitely carried over into the culture of the 90s.
In the early 1980s, graffiti art was a new trend among contemporary art collectors, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Graffiti comes from the Italian word "graffito" and was used to signify writings or scratching on walls. Writing on walls has been popular since ancient times (examples exist in Greece, Rome and Egypt). You can even see some ancient graffiti in the Mummy Chamber on the third floor of this museum! 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
What is the difference between this & Coptic art?
"Coptic" comes from the Greek word "Aigyptos" which means "Egypt." In art historical terms, "Coptic" is used to refer to Egyptian art created during the period of Roman and Byzantine occupation when Christianity was most prominent in Egypt. So the Coptic period itself begins later than when this piece was created; the Coptic period, according to art historians, begins around the 3rd century CE.
I've always wondered about these different faces in one statue.
In representations of Buddhist deities, each face shows a different ability or characteristic.
Marichi can be either peaceful or angry. That is the reason for the front-facing calm face, and the fierce face. And the symbol of a boar on one face represents determination.
This one is the goddess of dawn.
What do the three faces represent?
I am not sure that the three faces represent anything necessarily but we do know that much of Edwin and Mary Scheier's work (they were married and both created pottery) showed people-within-people or figures in womb-like shapes. They often use symbols of birth and the cycles of life in their art. They were also inspired by Chinese art, I don't know enough about Chinese art and motifs to say for sure, but possibly this was something that comes out of that inspiration. And here's an interesting fact: they first worked together as puppeteers, before they began collaborating on pottery!
Very powerful! What war is depicted here?
These paintings were from the Russo-Turkish war that took place in the late 1870s.
Vereshchagin also observed a lot of Russian military activity in Central Asia. He was a military staff artist from 1867-1870. What I find most interesting though is that his portrayals didn't show how great and powerful Russia was; his view was objectively about the horror and pain of war, irrespective of which side you're on.
Why is this ombré? Was it to do with fire of some sort?
Yes, it's been blackened by smoke, though the date of the fire is unknown.
How does the iconography/style reflect the early Renaissance movements?
You can see that it still incorporates silver and gold from medieval iconography, but is adding a sense of realism to the faces of the figures. It shows not only the graceful linear forms that characterize Sienese painting, but also the powerful effect of Florentine realism in the pliant muscularity of the Child and the sense of observed reality in the head of the Madonna.
Sano’s active workshop was the principal source in Siena for devotional images of the Madonna and Child.
Interesting. And then it continues the medieval style of having similar facial expressions on the figures depicted?
Yes, the facial expressions are still pretty static especially when you compare them to later Renaissance painting.
I find the contrast of the colors - the Virgin's cloak and Christ child's skin - so striking. It really gives the figures a sense of other-worldliness.The relationship of the figure to the frame is also innovative. The Madonna and child appear to hover before the arch of the frame by design as the frame was an integral part of the work (known as an engaged frame). By appearing to float in the viewer’s space, the Madonna and Child achieve a greater sense of tangibility and accessibility. This is in keeping with the Madonna seated on the ground theme (Madonna of Humility), which evokes a caring and humble mother.
Why are these two paired up?
They're paired to point out the cross-cultural dialogue that's taking place. For example, notice the woman's wardrobe in William Merritt Chase's painting. She's wearing a Japanese kimono, showing the late 19th century American interest in Asian arts and culture after trade was reestablished between the Western world and Japan for the first time in more than two hundred years."
Who are these people?
This plaque was from a really interesting time in Ancient Egyptian history, known as the Amarna period.
The figure on the left, Akhenaten completely changed the official religion in Egypt during his reign, excluding all the gods except Aten, a new sun god, who he built lavish temples for. He also significantly changed the way he as king was represented compared with previous rulers. Let me know if you have any questions in the Amarna galleries.
This feels like the 90's. Where did graffiti art originate and why?
This work is from 1984 but the 80s style of street art definitely carried over into the culture of the 90s.
In the early 1980s, graffiti art was a new trend among contemporary art collectors, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Graffiti comes from the Italian word "graffito" and was used to signify writings or scratching on walls. Writing on walls has been popular since ancient times (examples exist in Greece, Rome and Egypt). You can even see some ancient graffiti in the Mummy Chamber on the third floor of this museum! 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Have small plates, dinner, or drinks at The Norm restaurant and bar, led by Michelin-starred Chef Saul Bolton. Or stop by the BKM Café or Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group.

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
What is the difference between this & Coptic art?
"Coptic" comes from the Greek word "Aigyptos" which means "Egypt." In art historical terms, "Coptic" is used to refer to Egyptian art created during the period of Roman and Byzantine occupation when Christianity was most prominent in Egypt. So the Coptic period itself begins later than when this piece was created; the Coptic period, according to art historians, begins around the 3rd century CE.
I've always wondered about these different faces in one statue.
In representations of Buddhist deities, each face shows a different ability or characteristic.
Marichi can be either peaceful or angry. That is the reason for the front-facing calm face, and the fierce face. And the symbol of a boar on one face represents determination.
This one is the goddess of dawn.
What do the three faces represent?
I am not sure that the three faces represent anything necessarily but we do know that much of Edwin and Mary Scheier's work (they were married and both created pottery) showed people-within-people or figures in womb-like shapes. They often use symbols of birth and the cycles of life in their art. They were also inspired by Chinese art, I don't know enough about Chinese art and motifs to say for sure, but possibly this was something that comes out of that inspiration. And here's an interesting fact: they first worked together as puppeteers, before they began collaborating on pottery!
Very powerful! What war is depicted here?
These paintings were from the Russo-Turkish war that took place in the late 1870s.
Vereshchagin also observed a lot of Russian military activity in Central Asia. He was a military staff artist from 1867-1870. What I find most interesting though is that his portrayals didn't show how great and powerful Russia was; his view was objectively about the horror and pain of war, irrespective of which side you're on.
Why is this ombré? Was it to do with fire of some sort?
Yes, it's been blackened by smoke, though the date of the fire is unknown.
How does the iconography/style reflect the early Renaissance movements?
You can see that it still incorporates silver and gold from medieval iconography, but is adding a sense of realism to the faces of the figures. It shows not only the graceful linear forms that characterize Sienese painting, but also the powerful effect of Florentine realism in the pliant muscularity of the Child and the sense of observed reality in the head of the Madonna.
Sano’s active workshop was the principal source in Siena for devotional images of the Madonna and Child.
Interesting. And then it continues the medieval style of having similar facial expressions on the figures depicted?
Yes, the facial expressions are still pretty static especially when you compare them to later Renaissance painting.
I find the contrast of the colors - the Virgin's cloak and Christ child's skin - so striking. It really gives the figures a sense of other-worldliness.The relationship of the figure to the frame is also innovative. The Madonna and child appear to hover before the arch of the frame by design as the frame was an integral part of the work (known as an engaged frame). By appearing to float in the viewer’s space, the Madonna and Child achieve a greater sense of tangibility and accessibility. This is in keeping with the Madonna seated on the ground theme (Madonna of Humility), which evokes a caring and humble mother.
Why are these two paired up?
They're paired to point out the cross-cultural dialogue that's taking place. For example, notice the woman's wardrobe in William Merritt Chase's painting. She's wearing a Japanese kimono, showing the late 19th century American interest in Asian arts and culture after trade was reestablished between the Western world and Japan for the first time in more than two hundred years."
Who are these people?
This plaque was from a really interesting time in Ancient Egyptian history, known as the Amarna period.
The figure on the left, Akhenaten completely changed the official religion in Egypt during his reign, excluding all the gods except Aten, a new sun god, who he built lavish temples for. He also significantly changed the way he as king was represented compared with previous rulers. Let me know if you have any questions in the Amarna galleries.
This feels like the 90's. Where did graffiti art originate and why?
This work is from 1984 but the 80s style of street art definitely carried over into the culture of the 90s.
In the early 1980s, graffiti art was a new trend among contemporary art collectors, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Graffiti comes from the Italian word "graffito" and was used to signify writings or scratching on walls. Writing on walls has been popular since ancient times (examples exist in Greece, Rome and Egypt). You can even see some ancient graffiti in the Mummy Chamber on the third floor of this museum! 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
What is the difference between this & Coptic art?
"Coptic" comes from the Greek word "Aigyptos" which means "Egypt." In art historical terms, "Coptic" is used to refer to Egyptian art created during the period of Roman and Byzantine occupation when Christianity was most prominent in Egypt. So the Coptic period itself begins later than when this piece was created; the Coptic period, according to art historians, begins around the 3rd century CE.
I've always wondered about these different faces in one statue.
In representations of Buddhist deities, each face shows a different ability or characteristic.
Marichi can be either peaceful or angry. That is the reason for the front-facing calm face, and the fierce face. And the symbol of a boar on one face represents determination.
This one is the goddess of dawn.
What do the three faces represent?
I am not sure that the three faces represent anything necessarily but we do know that much of Edwin and Mary Scheier's work (they were married and both created pottery) showed people-within-people or figures in womb-like shapes. They often use symbols of birth and the cycles of life in their art. They were also inspired by Chinese art, I don't know enough about Chinese art and motifs to say for sure, but possibly this was something that comes out of that inspiration. And here's an interesting fact: they first worked together as puppeteers, before they began collaborating on pottery!
Very powerful! What war is depicted here?
These paintings were from the Russo-Turkish war that took place in the late 1870s.
Vereshchagin also observed a lot of Russian military activity in Central Asia. He was a military staff artist from 1867-1870. What I find most interesting though is that his portrayals didn't show how great and powerful Russia was; his view was objectively about the horror and pain of war, irrespective of which side you're on.
Why is this ombré? Was it to do with fire of some sort?
Yes, it's been blackened by smoke, though the date of the fire is unknown.
How does the iconography/style reflect the early Renaissance movements?
You can see that it still incorporates silver and gold from medieval iconography, but is adding a sense of realism to the faces of the figures. It shows not only the graceful linear forms that characterize Sienese painting, but also the powerful effect of Florentine realism in the pliant muscularity of the Child and the sense of observed reality in the head of the Madonna.
Sano’s active workshop was the principal source in Siena for devotional images of the Madonna and Child.
Interesting. And then it continues the medieval style of having similar facial expressions on the figures depicted?
Yes, the facial expressions are still pretty static especially when you compare them to later Renaissance painting.
I find the contrast of the colors - the Virgin's cloak and Christ child's skin - so striking. It really gives the figures a sense of other-worldliness.The relationship of the figure to the frame is also innovative. The Madonna and child appear to hover before the arch of the frame by design as the frame was an integral part of the work (known as an engaged frame). By appearing to float in the viewer’s space, the Madonna and Child achieve a greater sense of tangibility and accessibility. This is in keeping with the Madonna seated on the ground theme (Madonna of Humility), which evokes a caring and humble mother.
Why are these two paired up?
They're paired to point out the cross-cultural dialogue that's taking place. For example, notice the woman's wardrobe in William Merritt Chase's painting. She's wearing a Japanese kimono, showing the late 19th century American interest in Asian arts and culture after trade was reestablished between the Western world and Japan for the first time in more than two hundred years."
Who are these people?
This plaque was from a really interesting time in Ancient Egyptian history, known as the Amarna period.
The figure on the left, Akhenaten completely changed the official religion in Egypt during his reign, excluding all the gods except Aten, a new sun god, who he built lavish temples for. He also significantly changed the way he as king was represented compared with previous rulers. Let me know if you have any questions in the Amarna galleries.
This feels like the 90's. Where did graffiti art originate and why?
This work is from 1984 but the 80s style of street art definitely carried over into the culture of the 90s.
In the early 1980s, graffiti art was a new trend among contemporary art collectors, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Graffiti comes from the Italian word "graffito" and was used to signify writings or scratching on walls. Writing on walls has been popular since ancient times (examples exist in Greece, Rome and Egypt). You can even see some ancient graffiti in the Mummy Chamber on the third floor of this museum! 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
What is the difference between this & Coptic art?
"Coptic" comes from the Greek word "Aigyptos" which means "Egypt." In art historical terms, "Coptic" is used to refer to Egyptian art created during the period of Roman and Byzantine occupation when Christianity was most prominent in Egypt. So the Coptic period itself begins later than when this piece was created; the Coptic period, according to art historians, begins around the 3rd century CE.
I've always wondered about these different faces in one statue.
In representations of Buddhist deities, each face shows a different ability or characteristic.
Marichi can be either peaceful or angry. That is the reason for the front-facing calm face, and the fierce face. And the symbol of a boar on one face represents determination.
This one is the goddess of dawn.
What do the three faces represent?
I am not sure that the three faces represent anything necessarily but we do know that much of Edwin and Mary Scheier's work (they were married and both created pottery) showed people-within-people or figures in womb-like shapes. They often use symbols of birth and the cycles of life in their art. They were also inspired by Chinese art, I don't know enough about Chinese art and motifs to say for sure, but possibly this was something that comes out of that inspiration. And here's an interesting fact: they first worked together as puppeteers, before they began collaborating on pottery!
Very powerful! What war is depicted here?
These paintings were from the Russo-Turkish war that took place in the late 1870s.
Vereshchagin also observed a lot of Russian military activity in Central Asia. He was a military staff artist from 1867-1870. What I find most interesting though is that his portrayals didn't show how great and powerful Russia was; his view was objectively about the horror and pain of war, irrespective of which side you're on.
Why is this ombré? Was it to do with fire of some sort?
Yes, it's been blackened by smoke, though the date of the fire is unknown.
How does the iconography/style reflect the early Renaissance movements?
You can see that it still incorporates silver and gold from medieval iconography, but is adding a sense of realism to the faces of the figures. It shows not only the graceful linear forms that characterize Sienese painting, but also the powerful effect of Florentine realism in the pliant muscularity of the Child and the sense of observed reality in the head of the Madonna.
Sano’s active workshop was the principal source in Siena for devotional images of the Madonna and Child.
Interesting. And then it continues the medieval style of having similar facial expressions on the figures depicted?
Yes, the facial expressions are still pretty static especially when you compare them to later Renaissance painting.
I find the contrast of the colors - the Virgin's cloak and Christ child's skin - so striking. It really gives the figures a sense of other-worldliness.The relationship of the figure to the frame is also innovative. The Madonna and child appear to hover before the arch of the frame by design as the frame was an integral part of the work (known as an engaged frame). By appearing to float in the viewer’s space, the Madonna and Child achieve a greater sense of tangibility and accessibility. This is in keeping with the Madonna seated on the ground theme (Madonna of Humility), which evokes a caring and humble mother.
Why are these two paired up?
They're paired to point out the cross-cultural dialogue that's taking place. For example, notice the woman's wardrobe in William Merritt Chase's painting. She's wearing a Japanese kimono, showing the late 19th century American interest in Asian arts and culture after trade was reestablished between the Western world and Japan for the first time in more than two hundred years."
Who are these people?
This plaque was from a really interesting time in Ancient Egyptian history, known as the Amarna period.
The figure on the left, Akhenaten completely changed the official religion in Egypt during his reign, excluding all the gods except Aten, a new sun god, who he built lavish temples for. He also significantly changed the way he as king was represented compared with previous rulers. Let me know if you have any questions in the Amarna galleries.
This feels like the 90's. Where did graffiti art originate and why?
This work is from 1984 but the 80s style of street art definitely carried over into the culture of the 90s.
In the early 1980s, graffiti art was a new trend among contemporary art collectors, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Graffiti comes from the Italian word "graffito" and was used to signify writings or scratching on walls. Writing on walls has been popular since ancient times (examples exist in Greece, Rome and Egypt). You can even see some ancient graffiti in the Mummy Chamber on the third floor of this museum! 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (The Norm restaurant and bar; BKM Café and Bowl)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
What is the difference between this & Coptic art?
"Coptic" comes from the Greek word "Aigyptos" which means "Egypt." In art historical terms, "Coptic" is used to refer to Egyptian art created during the period of Roman and Byzantine occupation when Christianity was most prominent in Egypt. So the Coptic period itself begins later than when this piece was created; the Coptic period, according to art historians, begins around the 3rd century CE.
I've always wondered about these different faces in one statue.
In representations of Buddhist deities, each face shows a different ability or characteristic.
Marichi can be either peaceful or angry. That is the reason for the front-facing calm face, and the fierce face. And the symbol of a boar on one face represents determination.
This one is the goddess of dawn.
What do the three faces represent?
I am not sure that the three faces represent anything necessarily but we do know that much of Edwin and Mary Scheier's work (they were married and both created pottery) showed people-within-people or figures in womb-like shapes. They often use symbols of birth and the cycles of life in their art. They were also inspired by Chinese art, I don't know enough about Chinese art and motifs to say for sure, but possibly this was something that comes out of that inspiration. And here's an interesting fact: they first worked together as puppeteers, before they began collaborating on pottery!
Very powerful! What war is depicted here?
These paintings were from the Russo-Turkish war that took place in the late 1870s.
Vereshchagin also observed a lot of Russian military activity in Central Asia. He was a military staff artist from 1867-1870. What I find most interesting though is that his portrayals didn't show how great and powerful Russia was; his view was objectively about the horror and pain of war, irrespective of which side you're on.
Why is this ombré? Was it to do with fire of some sort?
Yes, it's been blackened by smoke, though the date of the fire is unknown.
How does the iconography/style reflect the early Renaissance movements?
You can see that it still incorporates silver and gold from medieval iconography, but is adding a sense of realism to the faces of the figures. It shows not only the graceful linear forms that characterize Sienese painting, but also the powerful effect of Florentine realism in the pliant muscularity of the Child and the sense of observed reality in the head of the Madonna.
Sano’s active workshop was the principal source in Siena for devotional images of the Madonna and Child.
Interesting. And then it continues the medieval style of having similar facial expressions on the figures depicted?
Yes, the facial expressions are still pretty static especially when you compare them to later Renaissance painting.
I find the contrast of the colors - the Virgin's cloak and Christ child's skin - so striking. It really gives the figures a sense of other-worldliness.The relationship of the figure to the frame is also innovative. The Madonna and child appear to hover before the arch of the frame by design as the frame was an integral part of the work (known as an engaged frame). By appearing to float in the viewer’s space, the Madonna and Child achieve a greater sense of tangibility and accessibility. This is in keeping with the Madonna seated on the ground theme (Madonna of Humility), which evokes a caring and humble mother.
Why are these two paired up?
They're paired to point out the cross-cultural dialogue that's taking place. For example, notice the woman's wardrobe in William Merritt Chase's painting. She's wearing a Japanese kimono, showing the late 19th century American interest in Asian arts and culture after trade was reestablished between the Western world and Japan for the first time in more than two hundred years."
Who are these people?
This plaque was from a really interesting time in Ancient Egyptian history, known as the Amarna period.
The figure on the left, Akhenaten completely changed the official religion in Egypt during his reign, excluding all the gods except Aten, a new sun god, who he built lavish temples for. He also significantly changed the way he as king was represented compared with previous rulers. Let me know if you have any questions in the Amarna galleries.
This feels like the 90's. Where did graffiti art originate and why?
This work is from 1984 but the 80s style of street art definitely carried over into the culture of the 90s.
In the early 1980s, graffiti art was a new trend among contemporary art collectors, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Graffiti comes from the Italian word "graffito" and was used to signify writings or scratching on walls. Writing on walls has been popular since ancient times (examples exist in Greece, Rome and Egypt). You can even see some ancient graffiti in the Mummy Chamber on the third floor of this museum! 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
What is the difference between this & Coptic art?
"Coptic" comes from the Greek word "Aigyptos" which means "Egypt." In art historical terms, "Coptic" is used to refer to Egyptian art created during the period of Roman and Byzantine occupation when Christianity was most prominent in Egypt. So the Coptic period itself begins later than when this piece was created; the Coptic period, according to art historians, begins around the 3rd century CE.
I've always wondered about these different faces in one statue.
In representations of Buddhist deities, each face shows a different ability or characteristic.
Marichi can be either peaceful or angry. That is the reason for the front-facing calm face, and the fierce face. And the symbol of a boar on one face represents determination.
This one is the goddess of dawn.
What do the three faces represent?
I am not sure that the three faces represent anything necessarily but we do know that much of Edwin and Mary Scheier's work (they were married and both created pottery) showed people-within-people or figures in womb-like shapes. They often use symbols of birth and the cycles of life in their art. They were also inspired by Chinese art, I don't know enough about Chinese art and motifs to say for sure, but possibly this was something that comes out of that inspiration. And here's an interesting fact: they first worked together as puppeteers, before they began collaborating on pottery!
Very powerful! What war is depicted here?
These paintings were from the Russo-Turkish war that took place in the late 1870s.
Vereshchagin also observed a lot of Russian military activity in Central Asia. He was a military staff artist from 1867-1870. What I find most interesting though is that his portrayals didn't show how great and powerful Russia was; his view was objectively about the horror and pain of war, irrespective of which side you're on.
Why is this ombré? Was it to do with fire of some sort?
Yes, it's been blackened by smoke, though the date of the fire is unknown.
How does the iconography/style reflect the early Renaissance movements?
You can see that it still incorporates silver and gold from medieval iconography, but is adding a sense of realism to the faces of the figures. It shows not only the graceful linear forms that characterize Sienese painting, but also the powerful effect of Florentine realism in the pliant muscularity of the Child and the sense of observed reality in the head of the Madonna.
Sano’s active workshop was the principal source in Siena for devotional images of the Madonna and Child.
Interesting. And then it continues the medieval style of having similar facial expressions on the figures depicted?
Yes, the facial expressions are still pretty static especially when you compare them to later Renaissance painting.
I find the contrast of the colors - the Virgin's cloak and Christ child's skin - so striking. It really gives the figures a sense of other-worldliness.The relationship of the figure to the frame is also innovative. The Madonna and child appear to hover before the arch of the frame by design as the frame was an integral part of the work (known as an engaged frame). By appearing to float in the viewer’s space, the Madonna and Child achieve a greater sense of tangibility and accessibility. This is in keeping with the Madonna seated on the ground theme (Madonna of Humility), which evokes a caring and humble mother.
Why are these two paired up?
They're paired to point out the cross-cultural dialogue that's taking place. For example, notice the woman's wardrobe in William Merritt Chase's painting. She's wearing a Japanese kimono, showing the late 19th century American interest in Asian arts and culture after trade was reestablished between the Western world and Japan for the first time in more than two hundred years."
Who are these people?
This plaque was from a really interesting time in Ancient Egyptian history, known as the Amarna period.
The figure on the left, Akhenaten completely changed the official religion in Egypt during his reign, excluding all the gods except Aten, a new sun god, who he built lavish temples for. He also significantly changed the way he as king was represented compared with previous rulers. Let me know if you have any questions in the Amarna galleries.
This feels like the 90's. Where did graffiti art originate and why?
This work is from 1984 but the 80s style of street art definitely carried over into the culture of the 90s.
In the early 1980s, graffiti art was a new trend among contemporary art collectors, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Graffiti comes from the Italian word "graffito" and was used to signify writings or scratching on walls. Writing on walls has been popular since ancient times (examples exist in Greece, Rome and Egypt). You can even see some ancient graffiti in the Mummy Chamber on the third floor of this museum! 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
What is the difference between this & Coptic art?
"Coptic" comes from the Greek word "Aigyptos" which means "Egypt." In art historical terms, "Coptic" is used to refer to Egyptian art created during the period of Roman and Byzantine occupation when Christianity was most prominent in Egypt. So the Coptic period itself begins later than when this piece was created; the Coptic period, according to art historians, begins around the 3rd century CE.
I've always wondered about these different faces in one statue.
In representations of Buddhist deities, each face shows a different ability or characteristic.
Marichi can be either peaceful or angry. That is the reason for the front-facing calm face, and the fierce face. And the symbol of a boar on one face represents determination.
This one is the goddess of dawn.
What do the three faces represent?
I am not sure that the three faces represent anything necessarily but we do know that much of Edwin and Mary Scheier's work (they were married and both created pottery) showed people-within-people or figures in womb-like shapes. They often use symbols of birth and the cycles of life in their art. They were also inspired by Chinese art, I don't know enough about Chinese art and motifs to say for sure, but possibly this was something that comes out of that inspiration. And here's an interesting fact: they first worked together as puppeteers, before they began collaborating on pottery!
Very powerful! What war is depicted here?
These paintings were from the Russo-Turkish war that took place in the late 1870s.
Vereshchagin also observed a lot of Russian military activity in Central Asia. He was a military staff artist from 1867-1870. What I find most interesting though is that his portrayals didn't show how great and powerful Russia was; his view was objectively about the horror and pain of war, irrespective of which side you're on.
Why is this ombré? Was it to do with fire of some sort?
Yes, it's been blackened by smoke, though the date of the fire is unknown.
How does the iconography/style reflect the early Renaissance movements?
You can see that it still incorporates silver and gold from medieval iconography, but is adding a sense of realism to the faces of the figures. It shows not only the graceful linear forms that characterize Sienese painting, but also the powerful effect of Florentine realism in the pliant muscularity of the Child and the sense of observed reality in the head of the Madonna.
Sano’s active workshop was the principal source in Siena for devotional images of the Madonna and Child.
Interesting. And then it continues the medieval style of having similar facial expressions on the figures depicted?
Yes, the facial expressions are still pretty static especially when you compare them to later Renaissance painting.
I find the contrast of the colors - the Virgin's cloak and Christ child's skin - so striking. It really gives the figures a sense of other-worldliness.The relationship of the figure to the frame is also innovative. The Madonna and child appear to hover before the arch of the frame by design as the frame was an integral part of the work (known as an engaged frame). By appearing to float in the viewer’s space, the Madonna and Child achieve a greater sense of tangibility and accessibility. This is in keeping with the Madonna seated on the ground theme (Madonna of Humility), which evokes a caring and humble mother.
Why are these two paired up?
They're paired to point out the cross-cultural dialogue that's taking place. For example, notice the woman's wardrobe in William Merritt Chase's painting. She's wearing a Japanese kimono, showing the late 19th century American interest in Asian arts and culture after trade was reestablished between the Western world and Japan for the first time in more than two hundred years."
Who are these people?
This plaque was from a really interesting time in Ancient Egyptian history, known as the Amarna period.
The figure on the left, Akhenaten completely changed the official religion in Egypt during his reign, excluding all the gods except Aten, a new sun god, who he built lavish temples for. He also significantly changed the way he as king was represented compared with previous rulers. Let me know if you have any questions in the Amarna galleries.
This feels like the 90's. Where did graffiti art originate and why?
This work is from 1984 but the 80s style of street art definitely carried over into the culture of the 90s.
In the early 1980s, graffiti art was a new trend among contemporary art collectors, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Graffiti comes from the Italian word "graffito" and was used to signify writings or scratching on walls. Writing on walls has been popular since ancient times (examples exist in Greece, Rome and Egypt). You can even see some ancient graffiti in the Mummy Chamber on the third floor of this museum! 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
What is the difference between this & Coptic art?
"Coptic" comes from the Greek word "Aigyptos" which means "Egypt." In art historical terms, "Coptic" is used to refer to Egyptian art created during the period of Roman and Byzantine occupation when Christianity was most prominent in Egypt. So the Coptic period itself begins later than when this piece was created; the Coptic period, according to art historians, begins around the 3rd century CE.
I've always wondered about these different faces in one statue.
In representations of Buddhist deities, each face shows a different ability or characteristic.
Marichi can be either peaceful or angry. That is the reason for the front-facing calm face, and the fierce face. And the symbol of a boar on one face represents determination.
This one is the goddess of dawn.
What do the three faces represent?
I am not sure that the three faces represent anything necessarily but we do know that much of Edwin and Mary Scheier's work (they were married and both created pottery) showed people-within-people or figures in womb-like shapes. They often use symbols of birth and the cycles of life in their art. They were also inspired by Chinese art, I don't know enough about Chinese art and motifs to say for sure, but possibly this was something that comes out of that inspiration. And here's an interesting fact: they first worked together as puppeteers, before they began collaborating on pottery!
Very powerful! What war is depicted here?
These paintings were from the Russo-Turkish war that took place in the late 1870s.
Vereshchagin also observed a lot of Russian military activity in Central Asia. He was a military staff artist from 1867-1870. What I find most interesting though is that his portrayals didn't show how great and powerful Russia was; his view was objectively about the horror and pain of war, irrespective of which side you're on.
Why is this ombré? Was it to do with fire of some sort?
Yes, it's been blackened by smoke, though the date of the fire is unknown.
How does the iconography/style reflect the early Renaissance movements?
You can see that it still incorporates silver and gold from medieval iconography, but is adding a sense of realism to the faces of the figures. It shows not only the graceful linear forms that characterize Sienese painting, but also the powerful effect of Florentine realism in the pliant muscularity of the Child and the sense of observed reality in the head of the Madonna.
Sano’s active workshop was the principal source in Siena for devotional images of the Madonna and Child.
Interesting. And then it continues the medieval style of having similar facial expressions on the figures depicted?
Yes, the facial expressions are still pretty static especially when you compare them to later Renaissance painting.
I find the contrast of the colors - the Virgin's cloak and Christ child's skin - so striking. It really gives the figures a sense of other-worldliness.The relationship of the figure to the frame is also innovative. The Madonna and child appear to hover before the arch of the frame by design as the frame was an integral part of the work (known as an engaged frame). By appearing to float in the viewer’s space, the Madonna and Child achieve a greater sense of tangibility and accessibility. This is in keeping with the Madonna seated on the ground theme (Madonna of Humility), which evokes a caring and humble mother.
Why are these two paired up?
They're paired to point out the cross-cultural dialogue that's taking place. For example, notice the woman's wardrobe in William Merritt Chase's painting. She's wearing a Japanese kimono, showing the late 19th century American interest in Asian arts and culture after trade was reestablished between the Western world and Japan for the first time in more than two hundred years."
Who are these people?
This plaque was from a really interesting time in Ancient Egyptian history, known as the Amarna period.
The figure on the left, Akhenaten completely changed the official religion in Egypt during his reign, excluding all the gods except Aten, a new sun god, who he built lavish temples for. He also significantly changed the way he as king was represented compared with previous rulers. Let me know if you have any questions in the Amarna galleries.
This feels like the 90's. Where did graffiti art originate and why?
This work is from 1984 but the 80s style of street art definitely carried over into the culture of the 90s.
In the early 1980s, graffiti art was a new trend among contemporary art collectors, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Graffiti comes from the Italian word "graffito" and was used to signify writings or scratching on walls. Writing on walls has been popular since ancient times (examples exist in Greece, Rome and Egypt). You can even see some ancient graffiti in the Mummy Chamber on the third floor of this museum! 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
What is the difference between this & Coptic art?
"Coptic" comes from the Greek word "Aigyptos" which means "Egypt." In art historical terms, "Coptic" is used to refer to Egyptian art created during the period of Roman and Byzantine occupation when Christianity was most prominent in Egypt. So the Coptic period itself begins later than when this piece was created; the Coptic period, according to art historians, begins around the 3rd century CE.
I've always wondered about these different faces in one statue.
In representations of Buddhist deities, each face shows a different ability or characteristic.
Marichi can be either peaceful or angry. That is the reason for the front-facing calm face, and the fierce face. And the symbol of a boar on one face represents determination.
This one is the goddess of dawn.
What do the three faces represent?
I am not sure that the three faces represent anything necessarily but we do know that much of Edwin and Mary Scheier's work (they were married and both created pottery) showed people-within-people or figures in womb-like shapes. They often use symbols of birth and the cycles of life in their art. They were also inspired by Chinese art, I don't know enough about Chinese art and motifs to say for sure, but possibly this was something that comes out of that inspiration. And here's an interesting fact: they first worked together as puppeteers, before they began collaborating on pottery!
Very powerful! What war is depicted here?
These paintings were from the Russo-Turkish war that took place in the late 1870s.
Vereshchagin also observed a lot of Russian military activity in Central Asia. He was a military staff artist from 1867-1870. What I find most interesting though is that his portrayals didn't show how great and powerful Russia was; his view was objectively about the horror and pain of war, irrespective of which side you're on.
Why is this ombré? Was it to do with fire of some sort?
Yes, it's been blackened by smoke, though the date of the fire is unknown.
How does the iconography/style reflect the early Renaissance movements?
You can see that it still incorporates silver and gold from medieval iconography, but is adding a sense of realism to the faces of the figures. It shows not only the graceful linear forms that characterize Sienese painting, but also the powerful effect of Florentine realism in the pliant muscularity of the Child and the sense of observed reality in the head of the Madonna.
Sano’s active workshop was the principal source in Siena for devotional images of the Madonna and Child.
Interesting. And then it continues the medieval style of having similar facial expressions on the figures depicted?
Yes, the facial expressions are still pretty static especially when you compare them to later Renaissance painting.
I find the contrast of the colors - the Virgin's cloak and Christ child's skin - so striking. It really gives the figures a sense of other-worldliness.The relationship of the figure to the frame is also innovative. The Madonna and child appear to hover before the arch of the frame by design as the frame was an integral part of the work (known as an engaged frame). By appearing to float in the viewer’s space, the Madonna and Child achieve a greater sense of tangibility and accessibility. This is in keeping with the Madonna seated on the ground theme (Madonna of Humility), which evokes a caring and humble mother.
Why are these two paired up?
They're paired to point out the cross-cultural dialogue that's taking place. For example, notice the woman's wardrobe in William Merritt Chase's painting. She's wearing a Japanese kimono, showing the late 19th century American interest in Asian arts and culture after trade was reestablished between the Western world and Japan for the first time in more than two hundred years."
Who are these people?
This plaque was from a really interesting time in Ancient Egyptian history, known as the Amarna period.
The figure on the left, Akhenaten completely changed the official religion in Egypt during his reign, excluding all the gods except Aten, a new sun god, who he built lavish temples for. He also significantly changed the way he as king was represented compared with previous rulers. Let me know if you have any questions in the Amarna galleries.
This feels like the 90's. Where did graffiti art originate and why?
This work is from 1984 but the 80s style of street art definitely carried over into the culture of the 90s.
In the early 1980s, graffiti art was a new trend among contemporary art collectors, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Graffiti comes from the Italian word "graffito" and was used to signify writings or scratching on walls. Writing on walls has been popular since ancient times (examples exist in Greece, Rome and Egypt). You can even see some ancient graffiti in the Mummy Chamber on the third floor of this museum! 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
What is the difference between this & Coptic art?
"Coptic" comes from the Greek word "Aigyptos" which means "Egypt." In art historical terms, "Coptic" is used to refer to Egyptian art created during the period of Roman and Byzantine occupation when Christianity was most prominent in Egypt. So the Coptic period itself begins later than when this piece was created; the Coptic period, according to art historians, begins around the 3rd century CE.
I've always wondered about these different faces in one statue.
In representations of Buddhist deities, each face shows a different ability or characteristic.
Marichi can be either peaceful or angry. That is the reason for the front-facing calm face, and the fierce face. And the symbol of a boar on one face represents determination.
This one is the goddess of dawn.
What do the three faces represent?
I am not sure that the three faces represent anything necessarily but we do know that much of Edwin and Mary Scheier's work (they were married and both created pottery) showed people-within-people or figures in womb-like shapes. They often use symbols of birth and the cycles of life in their art. They were also inspired by Chinese art, I don't know enough about Chinese art and motifs to say for sure, but possibly this was something that comes out of that inspiration. And here's an interesting fact: they first worked together as puppeteers, before they began collaborating on pottery!
Very powerful! What war is depicted here?
These paintings were from the Russo-Turkish war that took place in the late 1870s.
Vereshchagin also observed a lot of Russian military activity in Central Asia. He was a military staff artist from 1867-1870. What I find most interesting though is that his portrayals didn't show how great and powerful Russia was; his view was objectively about the horror and pain of war, irrespective of which side you're on.
Why is this ombré? Was it to do with fire of some sort?
Yes, it's been blackened by smoke, though the date of the fire is unknown.
How does the iconography/style reflect the early Renaissance movements?
You can see that it still incorporates silver and gold from medieval iconography, but is adding a sense of realism to the faces of the figures. It shows not only the graceful linear forms that characterize Sienese painting, but also the powerful effect of Florentine realism in the pliant muscularity of the Child and the sense of observed reality in the head of the Madonna.
Sano’s active workshop was the principal source in Siena for devotional images of the Madonna and Child.
Interesting. And then it continues the medieval style of having similar facial expressions on the figures depicted?
Yes, the facial expressions are still pretty static especially when you compare them to later Renaissance painting.
I find the contrast of the colors - the Virgin's cloak and Christ child's skin - so striking. It really gives the figures a sense of other-worldliness.The relationship of the figure to the frame is also innovative. The Madonna and child appear to hover before the arch of the frame by design as the frame was an integral part of the work (known as an engaged frame). By appearing to float in the viewer’s space, the Madonna and Child achieve a greater sense of tangibility and accessibility. This is in keeping with the Madonna seated on the ground theme (Madonna of Humility), which evokes a caring and humble mother.
Why are these two paired up?
They're paired to point out the cross-cultural dialogue that's taking place. For example, notice the woman's wardrobe in William Merritt Chase's painting. She's wearing a Japanese kimono, showing the late 19th century American interest in Asian arts and culture after trade was reestablished between the Western world and Japan for the first time in more than two hundred years."
Who are these people?
This plaque was from a really interesting time in Ancient Egyptian history, known as the Amarna period.
The figure on the left, Akhenaten completely changed the official religion in Egypt during his reign, excluding all the gods except Aten, a new sun god, who he built lavish temples for. He also significantly changed the way he as king was represented compared with previous rulers. Let me know if you have any questions in the Amarna galleries.
This feels like the 90's. Where did graffiti art originate and why?
This work is from 1984 but the 80s style of street art definitely carried over into the culture of the 90s.
In the early 1980s, graffiti art was a new trend among contemporary art collectors, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Graffiti comes from the Italian word "graffito" and was used to signify writings or scratching on walls. Writing on walls has been popular since ancient times (examples exist in Greece, Rome and Egypt). You can even see some ancient graffiti in the Mummy Chamber on the third floor of this museum! 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
What is the difference between this & Coptic art?
"Coptic" comes from the Greek word "Aigyptos" which means "Egypt." In art historical terms, "Coptic" is used to refer to Egyptian art created during the period of Roman and Byzantine occupation when Christianity was most prominent in Egypt. So the Coptic period itself begins later than when this piece was created; the Coptic period, according to art historians, begins around the 3rd century CE.
I've always wondered about these different faces in one statue.
In representations of Buddhist deities, each face shows a different ability or characteristic.
Marichi can be either peaceful or angry. That is the reason for the front-facing calm face, and the fierce face. And the symbol of a boar on one face represents determination.
This one is the goddess of dawn.
What do the three faces represent?
I am not sure that the three faces represent anything necessarily but we do know that much of Edwin and Mary Scheier's work (they were married and both created pottery) showed people-within-people or figures in womb-like shapes. They often use symbols of birth and the cycles of life in their art. They were also inspired by Chinese art, I don't know enough about Chinese art and motifs to say for sure, but possibly this was something that comes out of that inspiration. And here's an interesting fact: they first worked together as puppeteers, before they began collaborating on pottery!
Very powerful! What war is depicted here?
These paintings were from the Russo-Turkish war that took place in the late 1870s.
Vereshchagin also observed a lot of Russian military activity in Central Asia. He was a military staff artist from 1867-1870. What I find most interesting though is that his portrayals didn't show how great and powerful Russia was; his view was objectively about the horror and pain of war, irrespective of which side you're on.
Why is this ombré? Was it to do with fire of some sort?
Yes, it's been blackened by smoke, though the date of the fire is unknown.
How does the iconography/style reflect the early Renaissance movements?
You can see that it still incorporates silver and gold from medieval iconography, but is adding a sense of realism to the faces of the figures. It shows not only the graceful linear forms that characterize Sienese painting, but also the powerful effect of Florentine realism in the pliant muscularity of the Child and the sense of observed reality in the head of the Madonna.
Sano’s active workshop was the principal source in Siena for devotional images of the Madonna and Child.
Interesting. And then it continues the medieval style of having similar facial expressions on the figures depicted?
Yes, the facial expressions are still pretty static especially when you compare them to later Renaissance painting.
I find the contrast of the colors - the Virgin's cloak and Christ child's skin - so striking. It really gives the figures a sense of other-worldliness.The relationship of the figure to the frame is also innovative. The Madonna and child appear to hover before the arch of the frame by design as the frame was an integral part of the work (known as an engaged frame). By appearing to float in the viewer’s space, the Madonna and Child achieve a greater sense of tangibility and accessibility. This is in keeping with the Madonna seated on the ground theme (Madonna of Humility), which evokes a caring and humble mother.
Why are these two paired up?
They're paired to point out the cross-cultural dialogue that's taking place. For example, notice the woman's wardrobe in William Merritt Chase's painting. She's wearing a Japanese kimono, showing the late 19th century American interest in Asian arts and culture after trade was reestablished between the Western world and Japan for the first time in more than two hundred years."
Who are these people?
This plaque was from a really interesting time in Ancient Egyptian history, known as the Amarna period.
The figure on the left, Akhenaten completely changed the official religion in Egypt during his reign, excluding all the gods except Aten, a new sun god, who he built lavish temples for. He also significantly changed the way he as king was represented compared with previous rulers. Let me know if you have any questions in the Amarna galleries.
This feels like the 90's. Where did graffiti art originate and why?
This work is from 1984 but the 80s style of street art definitely carried over into the culture of the 90s.
In the early 1980s, graffiti art was a new trend among contemporary art collectors, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Graffiti comes from the Italian word "graffito" and was used to signify writings or scratching on walls. Writing on walls has been popular since ancient times (examples exist in Greece, Rome and Egypt). You can even see some ancient graffiti in the Mummy Chamber on the third floor of this museum! 
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Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.