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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me about Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl?
Sure! The artist Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl was originally from Germany and had a prolific career painting in the United States. He often painted watercolors and sketches of animals as well as works with allegorical themes.
That eye. I've seen it in so many places. Or eyes similar to that one... Any insight?
You are looking at the Wedjat eye! The Wedjat is a symbol of the Ancient Egyptian god Horus, who the king was thought to be the human embodiment of. The symbol is used as a protective measure in burials and funerary texts against evil forces. Horus is also shows as a falcon with wings outstretched. You'll see those two motifs repeat all throughout ancient Egyptian art
How did the artist get the paint to "come out" like that? Did the artist just dab large amounts of paint?
The effect you're noticing is called "impasto" coming from the Italian word for "mixture." It is a technique where paint is laid on an area of the surface very thickly, usually thickly enough that the brush or painting-knife strokes are visible. Artists at the time were drawn to this technique because it recorded the "action" of painting itself.
Richard Pousette-Dart actually created these large canvases that were densely packed with details from various cultures. He was inspired by Native American, African, and Oceanic art and wanted to convey transcendent spiritual truths.
Interesting...
I personally like getting really close, and then slowly taking small steps backwards to see new details emerge.
What and who is this?
That would be a sarcophagus lid carved of limestone. It was intended as a lid for a wealthy scribe and priest named Pa-di-Inpu. The very wealthy could afford stone sarcophagi, which have survived through the ages, whereas the less wealthy used wood or terra cotta for items in their tombs.
Why in Arabic?
Aha! Great question!
Mona Hatoum is the artist, and she likes to point at the idea of the youth in Arab countries, who are caught between action and inaction because of the political climates in their countries. "Waiting Is Forbidden" can be taken to mean no loitering.
Is she the photographer? Where are her pieces located?
She is a Canadian-based sculptor an most of her pieces are exhibited in Canada. Interestingly the artist hired a traditional sign-maker to create the work in the same format as a traditional Cairo street sign, which often has the name of the street written in two languages.
It's part of her series called "Cairo," where she also speaks about the immigrant journey, particularly for children and teenagers who stand between two different cultures.
Can you tell me some more about the painting titled The Root? Who are these people?
The figures are entirely fictional -- Lynette Yiadom-Boakye doesn't work with models. Instead she assembles images from scrapbooks, drawings, and her imagination.
Here's a quote from the artist that we find interesting: "The thing is that if you use a model, the painting becomes about capturing that particular person, and it’s disappointing if you can’t. I once tried to paint a friend, an incredible character, and it just wasn’t him. So moving away from that was to do with freedom.”
She paints quickly, completing the bulk of each canvas in a single day!
The label for this says Brooklyn waterfront is across. do you know where? Or is any of the businesses depicted here are still standing or in operation?
This painting depicts the OLD East River Park, which is now called "Carl Schurz Park." 
Oh. Where's that?
It's located on Manhattan's Upper East Side. If you looked out over the East River from this point today, you'd see Astoria, Queens. I used to live right in that area! You'd see brick apartment buildings and some warehouses from this vantage point.
Carl Schurz Park is located along FDR Drive in Manhattan, adjacent to the tip of Roosevelt Island.
Oh, I think I know it.
Most, if not all, of the buildings you see in this painting are long gone. There isn't much industry in the Astoria area any more as it has become quite residential.
Fun Fact: Carl Schurz Park is located near Gracie Mansion, where the mayor lives.
"A clever approach to representing depth, before the invention of perspective." When was perspective invented? And by whom?
In 1434/35, Leon Battista Alberti published the first major Renaissance treatise on perspective by Alberti based on ideas already known since antiquity.  At the same time, the great Florentine architect Brunelleschi (as in the dome of the cathedral) was experimenting in one point perspective. Prior to this, there were certainly attempts to create perspective but there was no scientific basis. It really was just artist trying to recreate nature. After Alberti it becomes scientific perspective as opposed to the earlier illusion of perspective.
Gothic art drew a lot of inspiration from Byzantine tile work, where figures can't appear to be behind each other, so they are stacked. Here the artist is stacking the figures to depict how a crowd of people might look.
Is the map suggesting that these areas share a common cultural or spiritual thread?
Did the Inca and Aztec share a common pantheon of gods?
The map is there to contextualize different tribes and peoples with current geo-political boundaries.
As for your second question, no, the Inca and Aztec didn't share much in terms of spiritual beliefs. The Aztec, reside in current day Mexico and northern Central America, whereas the Inca were based in South America. The Inca controlled almost the entire western region of South America extending from southern Colombia to central Chile.
There are similarities in their appreciation and execution of large building projects, but outside of that their gods and origin beliefs are very different. Would you care to know more?
Yes, please.
Okay! There is a fair amount of information, so let me start with the creation myths for both peoples.
The Aztecs believed that in the beginning was the void. It was at some ancient time in the Aztec creation story that the dual god, Ometecuhtli/Omecihuatl, created itself. This god was good and bad, chaos and order, male and female. Being male and female, it was able to have children. It had four, which came to represent the four directions of north, south, east and west.
The Inca believed that in the beginning, all was darkness and nothing existed (popular belief). Viracocha the Creator came forth from the waters of Lake Titicaca and created the land and the sky before returning to the lake. He also created a race of people - in some versions of the story they were giants. These people and their leaders displeased Viracocha, so he came out of the lake again and flooded the world to destroy them. He also turned some of the men into stones. Then Viracocha created the Sun, Moon and stars.
Sounds like Genesis.
It does, doesn't it? Floods, Giants, the beginning being entirely darkness. There are parallels to Christianity found in many other belief systems.
Does the museum have later Matisse paintings in the collection?
We have paintings from 1906 and 1916-17, not on view right now, as well as many prints, but they are highly light-sensitive, so they are rarely displayed.
This painting was the first Matisse painting ever exhibited in New York, incidentally!
No kidding. That is really cool. Where was it first exhibited?
In a gallery at 291 5th Avenue, owned by the photographer Alfred Stieglitz. It's a physically small work, but it has a lot of presence, Matisse's color is so vibrant, and it has that interesting history! It was also included in the infamous "Armory Show" here in New York in 1913, the exhibition that introduced the NYC public to international modern art. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me about Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl?
Sure! The artist Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl was originally from Germany and had a prolific career painting in the United States. He often painted watercolors and sketches of animals as well as works with allegorical themes.
That eye. I've seen it in so many places. Or eyes similar to that one... Any insight?
You are looking at the Wedjat eye! The Wedjat is a symbol of the Ancient Egyptian god Horus, who the king was thought to be the human embodiment of. The symbol is used as a protective measure in burials and funerary texts against evil forces. Horus is also shows as a falcon with wings outstretched. You'll see those two motifs repeat all throughout ancient Egyptian art
How did the artist get the paint to "come out" like that? Did the artist just dab large amounts of paint?
The effect you're noticing is called "impasto" coming from the Italian word for "mixture." It is a technique where paint is laid on an area of the surface very thickly, usually thickly enough that the brush or painting-knife strokes are visible. Artists at the time were drawn to this technique because it recorded the "action" of painting itself.
Richard Pousette-Dart actually created these large canvases that were densely packed with details from various cultures. He was inspired by Native American, African, and Oceanic art and wanted to convey transcendent spiritual truths.
Interesting...
I personally like getting really close, and then slowly taking small steps backwards to see new details emerge.
What and who is this?
That would be a sarcophagus lid carved of limestone. It was intended as a lid for a wealthy scribe and priest named Pa-di-Inpu. The very wealthy could afford stone sarcophagi, which have survived through the ages, whereas the less wealthy used wood or terra cotta for items in their tombs.
Why in Arabic?
Aha! Great question!
Mona Hatoum is the artist, and she likes to point at the idea of the youth in Arab countries, who are caught between action and inaction because of the political climates in their countries. "Waiting Is Forbidden" can be taken to mean no loitering.
Is she the photographer? Where are her pieces located?
She is a Canadian-based sculptor an most of her pieces are exhibited in Canada. Interestingly the artist hired a traditional sign-maker to create the work in the same format as a traditional Cairo street sign, which often has the name of the street written in two languages.
It's part of her series called "Cairo," where she also speaks about the immigrant journey, particularly for children and teenagers who stand between two different cultures.
Can you tell me some more about the painting titled The Root? Who are these people?
The figures are entirely fictional -- Lynette Yiadom-Boakye doesn't work with models. Instead she assembles images from scrapbooks, drawings, and her imagination.
Here's a quote from the artist that we find interesting: "The thing is that if you use a model, the painting becomes about capturing that particular person, and it’s disappointing if you can’t. I once tried to paint a friend, an incredible character, and it just wasn’t him. So moving away from that was to do with freedom.”
She paints quickly, completing the bulk of each canvas in a single day!
The label for this says Brooklyn waterfront is across. do you know where? Or is any of the businesses depicted here are still standing or in operation?
This painting depicts the OLD East River Park, which is now called "Carl Schurz Park." 
Oh. Where's that?
It's located on Manhattan's Upper East Side. If you looked out over the East River from this point today, you'd see Astoria, Queens. I used to live right in that area! You'd see brick apartment buildings and some warehouses from this vantage point.
Carl Schurz Park is located along FDR Drive in Manhattan, adjacent to the tip of Roosevelt Island.
Oh, I think I know it.
Most, if not all, of the buildings you see in this painting are long gone. There isn't much industry in the Astoria area any more as it has become quite residential.
Fun Fact: Carl Schurz Park is located near Gracie Mansion, where the mayor lives.
"A clever approach to representing depth, before the invention of perspective." When was perspective invented? And by whom?
In 1434/35, Leon Battista Alberti published the first major Renaissance treatise on perspective by Alberti based on ideas already known since antiquity.  At the same time, the great Florentine architect Brunelleschi (as in the dome of the cathedral) was experimenting in one point perspective. Prior to this, there were certainly attempts to create perspective but there was no scientific basis. It really was just artist trying to recreate nature. After Alberti it becomes scientific perspective as opposed to the earlier illusion of perspective.
Gothic art drew a lot of inspiration from Byzantine tile work, where figures can't appear to be behind each other, so they are stacked. Here the artist is stacking the figures to depict how a crowd of people might look.
Is the map suggesting that these areas share a common cultural or spiritual thread?
Did the Inca and Aztec share a common pantheon of gods?
The map is there to contextualize different tribes and peoples with current geo-political boundaries.
As for your second question, no, the Inca and Aztec didn't share much in terms of spiritual beliefs. The Aztec, reside in current day Mexico and northern Central America, whereas the Inca were based in South America. The Inca controlled almost the entire western region of South America extending from southern Colombia to central Chile.
There are similarities in their appreciation and execution of large building projects, but outside of that their gods and origin beliefs are very different. Would you care to know more?
Yes, please.
Okay! There is a fair amount of information, so let me start with the creation myths for both peoples.
The Aztecs believed that in the beginning was the void. It was at some ancient time in the Aztec creation story that the dual god, Ometecuhtli/Omecihuatl, created itself. This god was good and bad, chaos and order, male and female. Being male and female, it was able to have children. It had four, which came to represent the four directions of north, south, east and west.
The Inca believed that in the beginning, all was darkness and nothing existed (popular belief). Viracocha the Creator came forth from the waters of Lake Titicaca and created the land and the sky before returning to the lake. He also created a race of people - in some versions of the story they were giants. These people and their leaders displeased Viracocha, so he came out of the lake again and flooded the world to destroy them. He also turned some of the men into stones. Then Viracocha created the Sun, Moon and stars.
Sounds like Genesis.
It does, doesn't it? Floods, Giants, the beginning being entirely darkness. There are parallels to Christianity found in many other belief systems.
Does the museum have later Matisse paintings in the collection?
We have paintings from 1906 and 1916-17, not on view right now, as well as many prints, but they are highly light-sensitive, so they are rarely displayed.
This painting was the first Matisse painting ever exhibited in New York, incidentally!
No kidding. That is really cool. Where was it first exhibited?
In a gallery at 291 5th Avenue, owned by the photographer Alfred Stieglitz. It's a physically small work, but it has a lot of presence, Matisse's color is so vibrant, and it has that interesting history! It was also included in the infamous "Armory Show" here in New York in 1913, the exhibition that introduced the NYC public to international modern art. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me about Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl?
Sure! The artist Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl was originally from Germany and had a prolific career painting in the United States. He often painted watercolors and sketches of animals as well as works with allegorical themes.
That eye. I've seen it in so many places. Or eyes similar to that one... Any insight?
You are looking at the Wedjat eye! The Wedjat is a symbol of the Ancient Egyptian god Horus, who the king was thought to be the human embodiment of. The symbol is used as a protective measure in burials and funerary texts against evil forces. Horus is also shows as a falcon with wings outstretched. You'll see those two motifs repeat all throughout ancient Egyptian art
How did the artist get the paint to "come out" like that? Did the artist just dab large amounts of paint?
The effect you're noticing is called "impasto" coming from the Italian word for "mixture." It is a technique where paint is laid on an area of the surface very thickly, usually thickly enough that the brush or painting-knife strokes are visible. Artists at the time were drawn to this technique because it recorded the "action" of painting itself.
Richard Pousette-Dart actually created these large canvases that were densely packed with details from various cultures. He was inspired by Native American, African, and Oceanic art and wanted to convey transcendent spiritual truths.
Interesting...
I personally like getting really close, and then slowly taking small steps backwards to see new details emerge.
What and who is this?
That would be a sarcophagus lid carved of limestone. It was intended as a lid for a wealthy scribe and priest named Pa-di-Inpu. The very wealthy could afford stone sarcophagi, which have survived through the ages, whereas the less wealthy used wood or terra cotta for items in their tombs.
Why in Arabic?
Aha! Great question!
Mona Hatoum is the artist, and she likes to point at the idea of the youth in Arab countries, who are caught between action and inaction because of the political climates in their countries. "Waiting Is Forbidden" can be taken to mean no loitering.
Is she the photographer? Where are her pieces located?
She is a Canadian-based sculptor an most of her pieces are exhibited in Canada. Interestingly the artist hired a traditional sign-maker to create the work in the same format as a traditional Cairo street sign, which often has the name of the street written in two languages.
It's part of her series called "Cairo," where she also speaks about the immigrant journey, particularly for children and teenagers who stand between two different cultures.
Can you tell me some more about the painting titled The Root? Who are these people?
The figures are entirely fictional -- Lynette Yiadom-Boakye doesn't work with models. Instead she assembles images from scrapbooks, drawings, and her imagination.
Here's a quote from the artist that we find interesting: "The thing is that if you use a model, the painting becomes about capturing that particular person, and it’s disappointing if you can’t. I once tried to paint a friend, an incredible character, and it just wasn’t him. So moving away from that was to do with freedom.”
She paints quickly, completing the bulk of each canvas in a single day!
The label for this says Brooklyn waterfront is across. do you know where? Or is any of the businesses depicted here are still standing or in operation?
This painting depicts the OLD East River Park, which is now called "Carl Schurz Park." 
Oh. Where's that?
It's located on Manhattan's Upper East Side. If you looked out over the East River from this point today, you'd see Astoria, Queens. I used to live right in that area! You'd see brick apartment buildings and some warehouses from this vantage point.
Carl Schurz Park is located along FDR Drive in Manhattan, adjacent to the tip of Roosevelt Island.
Oh, I think I know it.
Most, if not all, of the buildings you see in this painting are long gone. There isn't much industry in the Astoria area any more as it has become quite residential.
Fun Fact: Carl Schurz Park is located near Gracie Mansion, where the mayor lives.
"A clever approach to representing depth, before the invention of perspective." When was perspective invented? And by whom?
In 1434/35, Leon Battista Alberti published the first major Renaissance treatise on perspective by Alberti based on ideas already known since antiquity.  At the same time, the great Florentine architect Brunelleschi (as in the dome of the cathedral) was experimenting in one point perspective. Prior to this, there were certainly attempts to create perspective but there was no scientific basis. It really was just artist trying to recreate nature. After Alberti it becomes scientific perspective as opposed to the earlier illusion of perspective.
Gothic art drew a lot of inspiration from Byzantine tile work, where figures can't appear to be behind each other, so they are stacked. Here the artist is stacking the figures to depict how a crowd of people might look.
Is the map suggesting that these areas share a common cultural or spiritual thread?
Did the Inca and Aztec share a common pantheon of gods?
The map is there to contextualize different tribes and peoples with current geo-political boundaries.
As for your second question, no, the Inca and Aztec didn't share much in terms of spiritual beliefs. The Aztec, reside in current day Mexico and northern Central America, whereas the Inca were based in South America. The Inca controlled almost the entire western region of South America extending from southern Colombia to central Chile.
There are similarities in their appreciation and execution of large building projects, but outside of that their gods and origin beliefs are very different. Would you care to know more?
Yes, please.
Okay! There is a fair amount of information, so let me start with the creation myths for both peoples.
The Aztecs believed that in the beginning was the void. It was at some ancient time in the Aztec creation story that the dual god, Ometecuhtli/Omecihuatl, created itself. This god was good and bad, chaos and order, male and female. Being male and female, it was able to have children. It had four, which came to represent the four directions of north, south, east and west.
The Inca believed that in the beginning, all was darkness and nothing existed (popular belief). Viracocha the Creator came forth from the waters of Lake Titicaca and created the land and the sky before returning to the lake. He also created a race of people - in some versions of the story they were giants. These people and their leaders displeased Viracocha, so he came out of the lake again and flooded the world to destroy them. He also turned some of the men into stones. Then Viracocha created the Sun, Moon and stars.
Sounds like Genesis.
It does, doesn't it? Floods, Giants, the beginning being entirely darkness. There are parallels to Christianity found in many other belief systems.
Does the museum have later Matisse paintings in the collection?
We have paintings from 1906 and 1916-17, not on view right now, as well as many prints, but they are highly light-sensitive, so they are rarely displayed.
This painting was the first Matisse painting ever exhibited in New York, incidentally!
No kidding. That is really cool. Where was it first exhibited?
In a gallery at 291 5th Avenue, owned by the photographer Alfred Stieglitz. It's a physically small work, but it has a lot of presence, Matisse's color is so vibrant, and it has that interesting history! It was also included in the infamous "Armory Show" here in New York in 1913, the exhibition that introduced the NYC public to international modern art. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until fall 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me about Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl?
Sure! The artist Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl was originally from Germany and had a prolific career painting in the United States. He often painted watercolors and sketches of animals as well as works with allegorical themes.
That eye. I've seen it in so many places. Or eyes similar to that one... Any insight?
You are looking at the Wedjat eye! The Wedjat is a symbol of the Ancient Egyptian god Horus, who the king was thought to be the human embodiment of. The symbol is used as a protective measure in burials and funerary texts against evil forces. Horus is also shows as a falcon with wings outstretched. You'll see those two motifs repeat all throughout ancient Egyptian art
How did the artist get the paint to "come out" like that? Did the artist just dab large amounts of paint?
The effect you're noticing is called "impasto" coming from the Italian word for "mixture." It is a technique where paint is laid on an area of the surface very thickly, usually thickly enough that the brush or painting-knife strokes are visible. Artists at the time were drawn to this technique because it recorded the "action" of painting itself.
Richard Pousette-Dart actually created these large canvases that were densely packed with details from various cultures. He was inspired by Native American, African, and Oceanic art and wanted to convey transcendent spiritual truths.
Interesting...
I personally like getting really close, and then slowly taking small steps backwards to see new details emerge.
What and who is this?
That would be a sarcophagus lid carved of limestone. It was intended as a lid for a wealthy scribe and priest named Pa-di-Inpu. The very wealthy could afford stone sarcophagi, which have survived through the ages, whereas the less wealthy used wood or terra cotta for items in their tombs.
Why in Arabic?
Aha! Great question!
Mona Hatoum is the artist, and she likes to point at the idea of the youth in Arab countries, who are caught between action and inaction because of the political climates in their countries. "Waiting Is Forbidden" can be taken to mean no loitering.
Is she the photographer? Where are her pieces located?
She is a Canadian-based sculptor an most of her pieces are exhibited in Canada. Interestingly the artist hired a traditional sign-maker to create the work in the same format as a traditional Cairo street sign, which often has the name of the street written in two languages.
It's part of her series called "Cairo," where she also speaks about the immigrant journey, particularly for children and teenagers who stand between two different cultures.
Can you tell me some more about the painting titled The Root? Who are these people?
The figures are entirely fictional -- Lynette Yiadom-Boakye doesn't work with models. Instead she assembles images from scrapbooks, drawings, and her imagination.
Here's a quote from the artist that we find interesting: "The thing is that if you use a model, the painting becomes about capturing that particular person, and it’s disappointing if you can’t. I once tried to paint a friend, an incredible character, and it just wasn’t him. So moving away from that was to do with freedom.”
She paints quickly, completing the bulk of each canvas in a single day!
The label for this says Brooklyn waterfront is across. do you know where? Or is any of the businesses depicted here are still standing or in operation?
This painting depicts the OLD East River Park, which is now called "Carl Schurz Park." 
Oh. Where's that?
It's located on Manhattan's Upper East Side. If you looked out over the East River from this point today, you'd see Astoria, Queens. I used to live right in that area! You'd see brick apartment buildings and some warehouses from this vantage point.
Carl Schurz Park is located along FDR Drive in Manhattan, adjacent to the tip of Roosevelt Island.
Oh, I think I know it.
Most, if not all, of the buildings you see in this painting are long gone. There isn't much industry in the Astoria area any more as it has become quite residential.
Fun Fact: Carl Schurz Park is located near Gracie Mansion, where the mayor lives.
"A clever approach to representing depth, before the invention of perspective." When was perspective invented? And by whom?
In 1434/35, Leon Battista Alberti published the first major Renaissance treatise on perspective by Alberti based on ideas already known since antiquity.  At the same time, the great Florentine architect Brunelleschi (as in the dome of the cathedral) was experimenting in one point perspective. Prior to this, there were certainly attempts to create perspective but there was no scientific basis. It really was just artist trying to recreate nature. After Alberti it becomes scientific perspective as opposed to the earlier illusion of perspective.
Gothic art drew a lot of inspiration from Byzantine tile work, where figures can't appear to be behind each other, so they are stacked. Here the artist is stacking the figures to depict how a crowd of people might look.
Is the map suggesting that these areas share a common cultural or spiritual thread?
Did the Inca and Aztec share a common pantheon of gods?
The map is there to contextualize different tribes and peoples with current geo-political boundaries.
As for your second question, no, the Inca and Aztec didn't share much in terms of spiritual beliefs. The Aztec, reside in current day Mexico and northern Central America, whereas the Inca were based in South America. The Inca controlled almost the entire western region of South America extending from southern Colombia to central Chile.
There are similarities in their appreciation and execution of large building projects, but outside of that their gods and origin beliefs are very different. Would you care to know more?
Yes, please.
Okay! There is a fair amount of information, so let me start with the creation myths for both peoples.
The Aztecs believed that in the beginning was the void. It was at some ancient time in the Aztec creation story that the dual god, Ometecuhtli/Omecihuatl, created itself. This god was good and bad, chaos and order, male and female. Being male and female, it was able to have children. It had four, which came to represent the four directions of north, south, east and west.
The Inca believed that in the beginning, all was darkness and nothing existed (popular belief). Viracocha the Creator came forth from the waters of Lake Titicaca and created the land and the sky before returning to the lake. He also created a race of people - in some versions of the story they were giants. These people and their leaders displeased Viracocha, so he came out of the lake again and flooded the world to destroy them. He also turned some of the men into stones. Then Viracocha created the Sun, Moon and stars.
Sounds like Genesis.
It does, doesn't it? Floods, Giants, the beginning being entirely darkness. There are parallels to Christianity found in many other belief systems.
Does the museum have later Matisse paintings in the collection?
We have paintings from 1906 and 1916-17, not on view right now, as well as many prints, but they are highly light-sensitive, so they are rarely displayed.
This painting was the first Matisse painting ever exhibited in New York, incidentally!
No kidding. That is really cool. Where was it first exhibited?
In a gallery at 291 5th Avenue, owned by the photographer Alfred Stieglitz. It's a physically small work, but it has a lot of presence, Matisse's color is so vibrant, and it has that interesting history! It was also included in the infamous "Armory Show" here in New York in 1913, the exhibition that introduced the NYC public to international modern art. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me about Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl?
Sure! The artist Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl was originally from Germany and had a prolific career painting in the United States. He often painted watercolors and sketches of animals as well as works with allegorical themes.
That eye. I've seen it in so many places. Or eyes similar to that one... Any insight?
You are looking at the Wedjat eye! The Wedjat is a symbol of the Ancient Egyptian god Horus, who the king was thought to be the human embodiment of. The symbol is used as a protective measure in burials and funerary texts against evil forces. Horus is also shows as a falcon with wings outstretched. You'll see those two motifs repeat all throughout ancient Egyptian art
How did the artist get the paint to "come out" like that? Did the artist just dab large amounts of paint?
The effect you're noticing is called "impasto" coming from the Italian word for "mixture." It is a technique where paint is laid on an area of the surface very thickly, usually thickly enough that the brush or painting-knife strokes are visible. Artists at the time were drawn to this technique because it recorded the "action" of painting itself.
Richard Pousette-Dart actually created these large canvases that were densely packed with details from various cultures. He was inspired by Native American, African, and Oceanic art and wanted to convey transcendent spiritual truths.
Interesting...
I personally like getting really close, and then slowly taking small steps backwards to see new details emerge.
What and who is this?
That would be a sarcophagus lid carved of limestone. It was intended as a lid for a wealthy scribe and priest named Pa-di-Inpu. The very wealthy could afford stone sarcophagi, which have survived through the ages, whereas the less wealthy used wood or terra cotta for items in their tombs.
Why in Arabic?
Aha! Great question!
Mona Hatoum is the artist, and she likes to point at the idea of the youth in Arab countries, who are caught between action and inaction because of the political climates in their countries. "Waiting Is Forbidden" can be taken to mean no loitering.
Is she the photographer? Where are her pieces located?
She is a Canadian-based sculptor an most of her pieces are exhibited in Canada. Interestingly the artist hired a traditional sign-maker to create the work in the same format as a traditional Cairo street sign, which often has the name of the street written in two languages.
It's part of her series called "Cairo," where she also speaks about the immigrant journey, particularly for children and teenagers who stand between two different cultures.
Can you tell me some more about the painting titled The Root? Who are these people?
The figures are entirely fictional -- Lynette Yiadom-Boakye doesn't work with models. Instead she assembles images from scrapbooks, drawings, and her imagination.
Here's a quote from the artist that we find interesting: "The thing is that if you use a model, the painting becomes about capturing that particular person, and it’s disappointing if you can’t. I once tried to paint a friend, an incredible character, and it just wasn’t him. So moving away from that was to do with freedom.”
She paints quickly, completing the bulk of each canvas in a single day!
The label for this says Brooklyn waterfront is across. do you know where? Or is any of the businesses depicted here are still standing or in operation?
This painting depicts the OLD East River Park, which is now called "Carl Schurz Park." 
Oh. Where's that?
It's located on Manhattan's Upper East Side. If you looked out over the East River from this point today, you'd see Astoria, Queens. I used to live right in that area! You'd see brick apartment buildings and some warehouses from this vantage point.
Carl Schurz Park is located along FDR Drive in Manhattan, adjacent to the tip of Roosevelt Island.
Oh, I think I know it.
Most, if not all, of the buildings you see in this painting are long gone. There isn't much industry in the Astoria area any more as it has become quite residential.
Fun Fact: Carl Schurz Park is located near Gracie Mansion, where the mayor lives.
"A clever approach to representing depth, before the invention of perspective." When was perspective invented? And by whom?
In 1434/35, Leon Battista Alberti published the first major Renaissance treatise on perspective by Alberti based on ideas already known since antiquity.  At the same time, the great Florentine architect Brunelleschi (as in the dome of the cathedral) was experimenting in one point perspective. Prior to this, there were certainly attempts to create perspective but there was no scientific basis. It really was just artist trying to recreate nature. After Alberti it becomes scientific perspective as opposed to the earlier illusion of perspective.
Gothic art drew a lot of inspiration from Byzantine tile work, where figures can't appear to be behind each other, so they are stacked. Here the artist is stacking the figures to depict how a crowd of people might look.
Is the map suggesting that these areas share a common cultural or spiritual thread?
Did the Inca and Aztec share a common pantheon of gods?
The map is there to contextualize different tribes and peoples with current geo-political boundaries.
As for your second question, no, the Inca and Aztec didn't share much in terms of spiritual beliefs. The Aztec, reside in current day Mexico and northern Central America, whereas the Inca were based in South America. The Inca controlled almost the entire western region of South America extending from southern Colombia to central Chile.
There are similarities in their appreciation and execution of large building projects, but outside of that their gods and origin beliefs are very different. Would you care to know more?
Yes, please.
Okay! There is a fair amount of information, so let me start with the creation myths for both peoples.
The Aztecs believed that in the beginning was the void. It was at some ancient time in the Aztec creation story that the dual god, Ometecuhtli/Omecihuatl, created itself. This god was good and bad, chaos and order, male and female. Being male and female, it was able to have children. It had four, which came to represent the four directions of north, south, east and west.
The Inca believed that in the beginning, all was darkness and nothing existed (popular belief). Viracocha the Creator came forth from the waters of Lake Titicaca and created the land and the sky before returning to the lake. He also created a race of people - in some versions of the story they were giants. These people and their leaders displeased Viracocha, so he came out of the lake again and flooded the world to destroy them. He also turned some of the men into stones. Then Viracocha created the Sun, Moon and stars.
Sounds like Genesis.
It does, doesn't it? Floods, Giants, the beginning being entirely darkness. There are parallels to Christianity found in many other belief systems.
Does the museum have later Matisse paintings in the collection?
We have paintings from 1906 and 1916-17, not on view right now, as well as many prints, but they are highly light-sensitive, so they are rarely displayed.
This painting was the first Matisse painting ever exhibited in New York, incidentally!
No kidding. That is really cool. Where was it first exhibited?
In a gallery at 291 5th Avenue, owned by the photographer Alfred Stieglitz. It's a physically small work, but it has a lot of presence, Matisse's color is so vibrant, and it has that interesting history! It was also included in the infamous "Armory Show" here in New York in 1913, the exhibition that introduced the NYC public to international modern art. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me about Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl?
Sure! The artist Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl was originally from Germany and had a prolific career painting in the United States. He often painted watercolors and sketches of animals as well as works with allegorical themes.
That eye. I've seen it in so many places. Or eyes similar to that one... Any insight?
You are looking at the Wedjat eye! The Wedjat is a symbol of the Ancient Egyptian god Horus, who the king was thought to be the human embodiment of. The symbol is used as a protective measure in burials and funerary texts against evil forces. Horus is also shows as a falcon with wings outstretched. You'll see those two motifs repeat all throughout ancient Egyptian art
How did the artist get the paint to "come out" like that? Did the artist just dab large amounts of paint?
The effect you're noticing is called "impasto" coming from the Italian word for "mixture." It is a technique where paint is laid on an area of the surface very thickly, usually thickly enough that the brush or painting-knife strokes are visible. Artists at the time were drawn to this technique because it recorded the "action" of painting itself.
Richard Pousette-Dart actually created these large canvases that were densely packed with details from various cultures. He was inspired by Native American, African, and Oceanic art and wanted to convey transcendent spiritual truths.
Interesting...
I personally like getting really close, and then slowly taking small steps backwards to see new details emerge.
What and who is this?
That would be a sarcophagus lid carved of limestone. It was intended as a lid for a wealthy scribe and priest named Pa-di-Inpu. The very wealthy could afford stone sarcophagi, which have survived through the ages, whereas the less wealthy used wood or terra cotta for items in their tombs.
Why in Arabic?
Aha! Great question!
Mona Hatoum is the artist, and she likes to point at the idea of the youth in Arab countries, who are caught between action and inaction because of the political climates in their countries. "Waiting Is Forbidden" can be taken to mean no loitering.
Is she the photographer? Where are her pieces located?
She is a Canadian-based sculptor an most of her pieces are exhibited in Canada. Interestingly the artist hired a traditional sign-maker to create the work in the same format as a traditional Cairo street sign, which often has the name of the street written in two languages.
It's part of her series called "Cairo," where she also speaks about the immigrant journey, particularly for children and teenagers who stand between two different cultures.
Can you tell me some more about the painting titled The Root? Who are these people?
The figures are entirely fictional -- Lynette Yiadom-Boakye doesn't work with models. Instead she assembles images from scrapbooks, drawings, and her imagination.
Here's a quote from the artist that we find interesting: "The thing is that if you use a model, the painting becomes about capturing that particular person, and it’s disappointing if you can’t. I once tried to paint a friend, an incredible character, and it just wasn’t him. So moving away from that was to do with freedom.”
She paints quickly, completing the bulk of each canvas in a single day!
The label for this says Brooklyn waterfront is across. do you know where? Or is any of the businesses depicted here are still standing or in operation?
This painting depicts the OLD East River Park, which is now called "Carl Schurz Park." 
Oh. Where's that?
It's located on Manhattan's Upper East Side. If you looked out over the East River from this point today, you'd see Astoria, Queens. I used to live right in that area! You'd see brick apartment buildings and some warehouses from this vantage point.
Carl Schurz Park is located along FDR Drive in Manhattan, adjacent to the tip of Roosevelt Island.
Oh, I think I know it.
Most, if not all, of the buildings you see in this painting are long gone. There isn't much industry in the Astoria area any more as it has become quite residential.
Fun Fact: Carl Schurz Park is located near Gracie Mansion, where the mayor lives.
"A clever approach to representing depth, before the invention of perspective." When was perspective invented? And by whom?
In 1434/35, Leon Battista Alberti published the first major Renaissance treatise on perspective by Alberti based on ideas already known since antiquity.  At the same time, the great Florentine architect Brunelleschi (as in the dome of the cathedral) was experimenting in one point perspective. Prior to this, there were certainly attempts to create perspective but there was no scientific basis. It really was just artist trying to recreate nature. After Alberti it becomes scientific perspective as opposed to the earlier illusion of perspective.
Gothic art drew a lot of inspiration from Byzantine tile work, where figures can't appear to be behind each other, so they are stacked. Here the artist is stacking the figures to depict how a crowd of people might look.
Is the map suggesting that these areas share a common cultural or spiritual thread?
Did the Inca and Aztec share a common pantheon of gods?
The map is there to contextualize different tribes and peoples with current geo-political boundaries.
As for your second question, no, the Inca and Aztec didn't share much in terms of spiritual beliefs. The Aztec, reside in current day Mexico and northern Central America, whereas the Inca were based in South America. The Inca controlled almost the entire western region of South America extending from southern Colombia to central Chile.
There are similarities in their appreciation and execution of large building projects, but outside of that their gods and origin beliefs are very different. Would you care to know more?
Yes, please.
Okay! There is a fair amount of information, so let me start with the creation myths for both peoples.
The Aztecs believed that in the beginning was the void. It was at some ancient time in the Aztec creation story that the dual god, Ometecuhtli/Omecihuatl, created itself. This god was good and bad, chaos and order, male and female. Being male and female, it was able to have children. It had four, which came to represent the four directions of north, south, east and west.
The Inca believed that in the beginning, all was darkness and nothing existed (popular belief). Viracocha the Creator came forth from the waters of Lake Titicaca and created the land and the sky before returning to the lake. He also created a race of people - in some versions of the story they were giants. These people and their leaders displeased Viracocha, so he came out of the lake again and flooded the world to destroy them. He also turned some of the men into stones. Then Viracocha created the Sun, Moon and stars.
Sounds like Genesis.
It does, doesn't it? Floods, Giants, the beginning being entirely darkness. There are parallels to Christianity found in many other belief systems.
Does the museum have later Matisse paintings in the collection?
We have paintings from 1906 and 1916-17, not on view right now, as well as many prints, but they are highly light-sensitive, so they are rarely displayed.
This painting was the first Matisse painting ever exhibited in New York, incidentally!
No kidding. That is really cool. Where was it first exhibited?
In a gallery at 291 5th Avenue, owned by the photographer Alfred Stieglitz. It's a physically small work, but it has a lot of presence, Matisse's color is so vibrant, and it has that interesting history! It was also included in the infamous "Armory Show" here in New York in 1913, the exhibition that introduced the NYC public to international modern art. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me about Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl?
Sure! The artist Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl was originally from Germany and had a prolific career painting in the United States. He often painted watercolors and sketches of animals as well as works with allegorical themes.
That eye. I've seen it in so many places. Or eyes similar to that one... Any insight?
You are looking at the Wedjat eye! The Wedjat is a symbol of the Ancient Egyptian god Horus, who the king was thought to be the human embodiment of. The symbol is used as a protective measure in burials and funerary texts against evil forces. Horus is also shows as a falcon with wings outstretched. You'll see those two motifs repeat all throughout ancient Egyptian art
How did the artist get the paint to "come out" like that? Did the artist just dab large amounts of paint?
The effect you're noticing is called "impasto" coming from the Italian word for "mixture." It is a technique where paint is laid on an area of the surface very thickly, usually thickly enough that the brush or painting-knife strokes are visible. Artists at the time were drawn to this technique because it recorded the "action" of painting itself.
Richard Pousette-Dart actually created these large canvases that were densely packed with details from various cultures. He was inspired by Native American, African, and Oceanic art and wanted to convey transcendent spiritual truths.
Interesting...
I personally like getting really close, and then slowly taking small steps backwards to see new details emerge.
What and who is this?
That would be a sarcophagus lid carved of limestone. It was intended as a lid for a wealthy scribe and priest named Pa-di-Inpu. The very wealthy could afford stone sarcophagi, which have survived through the ages, whereas the less wealthy used wood or terra cotta for items in their tombs.
Why in Arabic?
Aha! Great question!
Mona Hatoum is the artist, and she likes to point at the idea of the youth in Arab countries, who are caught between action and inaction because of the political climates in their countries. "Waiting Is Forbidden" can be taken to mean no loitering.
Is she the photographer? Where are her pieces located?
She is a Canadian-based sculptor an most of her pieces are exhibited in Canada. Interestingly the artist hired a traditional sign-maker to create the work in the same format as a traditional Cairo street sign, which often has the name of the street written in two languages.
It's part of her series called "Cairo," where she also speaks about the immigrant journey, particularly for children and teenagers who stand between two different cultures.
Can you tell me some more about the painting titled The Root? Who are these people?
The figures are entirely fictional -- Lynette Yiadom-Boakye doesn't work with models. Instead she assembles images from scrapbooks, drawings, and her imagination.
Here's a quote from the artist that we find interesting: "The thing is that if you use a model, the painting becomes about capturing that particular person, and it’s disappointing if you can’t. I once tried to paint a friend, an incredible character, and it just wasn’t him. So moving away from that was to do with freedom.”
She paints quickly, completing the bulk of each canvas in a single day!
The label for this says Brooklyn waterfront is across. do you know where? Or is any of the businesses depicted here are still standing or in operation?
This painting depicts the OLD East River Park, which is now called "Carl Schurz Park." 
Oh. Where's that?
It's located on Manhattan's Upper East Side. If you looked out over the East River from this point today, you'd see Astoria, Queens. I used to live right in that area! You'd see brick apartment buildings and some warehouses from this vantage point.
Carl Schurz Park is located along FDR Drive in Manhattan, adjacent to the tip of Roosevelt Island.
Oh, I think I know it.
Most, if not all, of the buildings you see in this painting are long gone. There isn't much industry in the Astoria area any more as it has become quite residential.
Fun Fact: Carl Schurz Park is located near Gracie Mansion, where the mayor lives.
"A clever approach to representing depth, before the invention of perspective." When was perspective invented? And by whom?
In 1434/35, Leon Battista Alberti published the first major Renaissance treatise on perspective by Alberti based on ideas already known since antiquity.  At the same time, the great Florentine architect Brunelleschi (as in the dome of the cathedral) was experimenting in one point perspective. Prior to this, there were certainly attempts to create perspective but there was no scientific basis. It really was just artist trying to recreate nature. After Alberti it becomes scientific perspective as opposed to the earlier illusion of perspective.
Gothic art drew a lot of inspiration from Byzantine tile work, where figures can't appear to be behind each other, so they are stacked. Here the artist is stacking the figures to depict how a crowd of people might look.
Is the map suggesting that these areas share a common cultural or spiritual thread?
Did the Inca and Aztec share a common pantheon of gods?
The map is there to contextualize different tribes and peoples with current geo-political boundaries.
As for your second question, no, the Inca and Aztec didn't share much in terms of spiritual beliefs. The Aztec, reside in current day Mexico and northern Central America, whereas the Inca were based in South America. The Inca controlled almost the entire western region of South America extending from southern Colombia to central Chile.
There are similarities in their appreciation and execution of large building projects, but outside of that their gods and origin beliefs are very different. Would you care to know more?
Yes, please.
Okay! There is a fair amount of information, so let me start with the creation myths for both peoples.
The Aztecs believed that in the beginning was the void. It was at some ancient time in the Aztec creation story that the dual god, Ometecuhtli/Omecihuatl, created itself. This god was good and bad, chaos and order, male and female. Being male and female, it was able to have children. It had four, which came to represent the four directions of north, south, east and west.
The Inca believed that in the beginning, all was darkness and nothing existed (popular belief). Viracocha the Creator came forth from the waters of Lake Titicaca and created the land and the sky before returning to the lake. He also created a race of people - in some versions of the story they were giants. These people and their leaders displeased Viracocha, so he came out of the lake again and flooded the world to destroy them. He also turned some of the men into stones. Then Viracocha created the Sun, Moon and stars.
Sounds like Genesis.
It does, doesn't it? Floods, Giants, the beginning being entirely darkness. There are parallels to Christianity found in many other belief systems.
Does the museum have later Matisse paintings in the collection?
We have paintings from 1906 and 1916-17, not on view right now, as well as many prints, but they are highly light-sensitive, so they are rarely displayed.
This painting was the first Matisse painting ever exhibited in New York, incidentally!
No kidding. That is really cool. Where was it first exhibited?
In a gallery at 291 5th Avenue, owned by the photographer Alfred Stieglitz. It's a physically small work, but it has a lot of presence, Matisse's color is so vibrant, and it has that interesting history! It was also included in the infamous "Armory Show" here in New York in 1913, the exhibition that introduced the NYC public to international modern art. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me about Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl?
Sure! The artist Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl was originally from Germany and had a prolific career painting in the United States. He often painted watercolors and sketches of animals as well as works with allegorical themes.
That eye. I've seen it in so many places. Or eyes similar to that one... Any insight?
You are looking at the Wedjat eye! The Wedjat is a symbol of the Ancient Egyptian god Horus, who the king was thought to be the human embodiment of. The symbol is used as a protective measure in burials and funerary texts against evil forces. Horus is also shows as a falcon with wings outstretched. You'll see those two motifs repeat all throughout ancient Egyptian art
How did the artist get the paint to "come out" like that? Did the artist just dab large amounts of paint?
The effect you're noticing is called "impasto" coming from the Italian word for "mixture." It is a technique where paint is laid on an area of the surface very thickly, usually thickly enough that the brush or painting-knife strokes are visible. Artists at the time were drawn to this technique because it recorded the "action" of painting itself.
Richard Pousette-Dart actually created these large canvases that were densely packed with details from various cultures. He was inspired by Native American, African, and Oceanic art and wanted to convey transcendent spiritual truths.
Interesting...
I personally like getting really close, and then slowly taking small steps backwards to see new details emerge.
What and who is this?
That would be a sarcophagus lid carved of limestone. It was intended as a lid for a wealthy scribe and priest named Pa-di-Inpu. The very wealthy could afford stone sarcophagi, which have survived through the ages, whereas the less wealthy used wood or terra cotta for items in their tombs.
Why in Arabic?
Aha! Great question!
Mona Hatoum is the artist, and she likes to point at the idea of the youth in Arab countries, who are caught between action and inaction because of the political climates in their countries. "Waiting Is Forbidden" can be taken to mean no loitering.
Is she the photographer? Where are her pieces located?
She is a Canadian-based sculptor an most of her pieces are exhibited in Canada. Interestingly the artist hired a traditional sign-maker to create the work in the same format as a traditional Cairo street sign, which often has the name of the street written in two languages.
It's part of her series called "Cairo," where she also speaks about the immigrant journey, particularly for children and teenagers who stand between two different cultures.
Can you tell me some more about the painting titled The Root? Who are these people?
The figures are entirely fictional -- Lynette Yiadom-Boakye doesn't work with models. Instead she assembles images from scrapbooks, drawings, and her imagination.
Here's a quote from the artist that we find interesting: "The thing is that if you use a model, the painting becomes about capturing that particular person, and it’s disappointing if you can’t. I once tried to paint a friend, an incredible character, and it just wasn’t him. So moving away from that was to do with freedom.”
She paints quickly, completing the bulk of each canvas in a single day!
The label for this says Brooklyn waterfront is across. do you know where? Or is any of the businesses depicted here are still standing or in operation?
This painting depicts the OLD East River Park, which is now called "Carl Schurz Park." 
Oh. Where's that?
It's located on Manhattan's Upper East Side. If you looked out over the East River from this point today, you'd see Astoria, Queens. I used to live right in that area! You'd see brick apartment buildings and some warehouses from this vantage point.
Carl Schurz Park is located along FDR Drive in Manhattan, adjacent to the tip of Roosevelt Island.
Oh, I think I know it.
Most, if not all, of the buildings you see in this painting are long gone. There isn't much industry in the Astoria area any more as it has become quite residential.
Fun Fact: Carl Schurz Park is located near Gracie Mansion, where the mayor lives.
"A clever approach to representing depth, before the invention of perspective." When was perspective invented? And by whom?
In 1434/35, Leon Battista Alberti published the first major Renaissance treatise on perspective by Alberti based on ideas already known since antiquity.  At the same time, the great Florentine architect Brunelleschi (as in the dome of the cathedral) was experimenting in one point perspective. Prior to this, there were certainly attempts to create perspective but there was no scientific basis. It really was just artist trying to recreate nature. After Alberti it becomes scientific perspective as opposed to the earlier illusion of perspective.
Gothic art drew a lot of inspiration from Byzantine tile work, where figures can't appear to be behind each other, so they are stacked. Here the artist is stacking the figures to depict how a crowd of people might look.
Is the map suggesting that these areas share a common cultural or spiritual thread?
Did the Inca and Aztec share a common pantheon of gods?
The map is there to contextualize different tribes and peoples with current geo-political boundaries.
As for your second question, no, the Inca and Aztec didn't share much in terms of spiritual beliefs. The Aztec, reside in current day Mexico and northern Central America, whereas the Inca were based in South America. The Inca controlled almost the entire western region of South America extending from southern Colombia to central Chile.
There are similarities in their appreciation and execution of large building projects, but outside of that their gods and origin beliefs are very different. Would you care to know more?
Yes, please.
Okay! There is a fair amount of information, so let me start with the creation myths for both peoples.
The Aztecs believed that in the beginning was the void. It was at some ancient time in the Aztec creation story that the dual god, Ometecuhtli/Omecihuatl, created itself. This god was good and bad, chaos and order, male and female. Being male and female, it was able to have children. It had four, which came to represent the four directions of north, south, east and west.
The Inca believed that in the beginning, all was darkness and nothing existed (popular belief). Viracocha the Creator came forth from the waters of Lake Titicaca and created the land and the sky before returning to the lake. He also created a race of people - in some versions of the story they were giants. These people and their leaders displeased Viracocha, so he came out of the lake again and flooded the world to destroy them. He also turned some of the men into stones. Then Viracocha created the Sun, Moon and stars.
Sounds like Genesis.
It does, doesn't it? Floods, Giants, the beginning being entirely darkness. There are parallels to Christianity found in many other belief systems.
Does the museum have later Matisse paintings in the collection?
We have paintings from 1906 and 1916-17, not on view right now, as well as many prints, but they are highly light-sensitive, so they are rarely displayed.
This painting was the first Matisse painting ever exhibited in New York, incidentally!
No kidding. That is really cool. Where was it first exhibited?
In a gallery at 291 5th Avenue, owned by the photographer Alfred Stieglitz. It's a physically small work, but it has a lot of presence, Matisse's color is so vibrant, and it has that interesting history! It was also included in the infamous "Armory Show" here in New York in 1913, the exhibition that introduced the NYC public to international modern art. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me about Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl?
Sure! The artist Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl was originally from Germany and had a prolific career painting in the United States. He often painted watercolors and sketches of animals as well as works with allegorical themes.
That eye. I've seen it in so many places. Or eyes similar to that one... Any insight?
You are looking at the Wedjat eye! The Wedjat is a symbol of the Ancient Egyptian god Horus, who the king was thought to be the human embodiment of. The symbol is used as a protective measure in burials and funerary texts against evil forces. Horus is also shows as a falcon with wings outstretched. You'll see those two motifs repeat all throughout ancient Egyptian art
How did the artist get the paint to "come out" like that? Did the artist just dab large amounts of paint?
The effect you're noticing is called "impasto" coming from the Italian word for "mixture." It is a technique where paint is laid on an area of the surface very thickly, usually thickly enough that the brush or painting-knife strokes are visible. Artists at the time were drawn to this technique because it recorded the "action" of painting itself.
Richard Pousette-Dart actually created these large canvases that were densely packed with details from various cultures. He was inspired by Native American, African, and Oceanic art and wanted to convey transcendent spiritual truths.
Interesting...
I personally like getting really close, and then slowly taking small steps backwards to see new details emerge.
What and who is this?
That would be a sarcophagus lid carved of limestone. It was intended as a lid for a wealthy scribe and priest named Pa-di-Inpu. The very wealthy could afford stone sarcophagi, which have survived through the ages, whereas the less wealthy used wood or terra cotta for items in their tombs.
Why in Arabic?
Aha! Great question!
Mona Hatoum is the artist, and she likes to point at the idea of the youth in Arab countries, who are caught between action and inaction because of the political climates in their countries. "Waiting Is Forbidden" can be taken to mean no loitering.
Is she the photographer? Where are her pieces located?
She is a Canadian-based sculptor an most of her pieces are exhibited in Canada. Interestingly the artist hired a traditional sign-maker to create the work in the same format as a traditional Cairo street sign, which often has the name of the street written in two languages.
It's part of her series called "Cairo," where she also speaks about the immigrant journey, particularly for children and teenagers who stand between two different cultures.
Can you tell me some more about the painting titled The Root? Who are these people?
The figures are entirely fictional -- Lynette Yiadom-Boakye doesn't work with models. Instead she assembles images from scrapbooks, drawings, and her imagination.
Here's a quote from the artist that we find interesting: "The thing is that if you use a model, the painting becomes about capturing that particular person, and it’s disappointing if you can’t. I once tried to paint a friend, an incredible character, and it just wasn’t him. So moving away from that was to do with freedom.”
She paints quickly, completing the bulk of each canvas in a single day!
The label for this says Brooklyn waterfront is across. do you know where? Or is any of the businesses depicted here are still standing or in operation?
This painting depicts the OLD East River Park, which is now called "Carl Schurz Park." 
Oh. Where's that?
It's located on Manhattan's Upper East Side. If you looked out over the East River from this point today, you'd see Astoria, Queens. I used to live right in that area! You'd see brick apartment buildings and some warehouses from this vantage point.
Carl Schurz Park is located along FDR Drive in Manhattan, adjacent to the tip of Roosevelt Island.
Oh, I think I know it.
Most, if not all, of the buildings you see in this painting are long gone. There isn't much industry in the Astoria area any more as it has become quite residential.
Fun Fact: Carl Schurz Park is located near Gracie Mansion, where the mayor lives.
"A clever approach to representing depth, before the invention of perspective." When was perspective invented? And by whom?
In 1434/35, Leon Battista Alberti published the first major Renaissance treatise on perspective by Alberti based on ideas already known since antiquity.  At the same time, the great Florentine architect Brunelleschi (as in the dome of the cathedral) was experimenting in one point perspective. Prior to this, there were certainly attempts to create perspective but there was no scientific basis. It really was just artist trying to recreate nature. After Alberti it becomes scientific perspective as opposed to the earlier illusion of perspective.
Gothic art drew a lot of inspiration from Byzantine tile work, where figures can't appear to be behind each other, so they are stacked. Here the artist is stacking the figures to depict how a crowd of people might look.
Is the map suggesting that these areas share a common cultural or spiritual thread?
Did the Inca and Aztec share a common pantheon of gods?
The map is there to contextualize different tribes and peoples with current geo-political boundaries.
As for your second question, no, the Inca and Aztec didn't share much in terms of spiritual beliefs. The Aztec, reside in current day Mexico and northern Central America, whereas the Inca were based in South America. The Inca controlled almost the entire western region of South America extending from southern Colombia to central Chile.
There are similarities in their appreciation and execution of large building projects, but outside of that their gods and origin beliefs are very different. Would you care to know more?
Yes, please.
Okay! There is a fair amount of information, so let me start with the creation myths for both peoples.
The Aztecs believed that in the beginning was the void. It was at some ancient time in the Aztec creation story that the dual god, Ometecuhtli/Omecihuatl, created itself. This god was good and bad, chaos and order, male and female. Being male and female, it was able to have children. It had four, which came to represent the four directions of north, south, east and west.
The Inca believed that in the beginning, all was darkness and nothing existed (popular belief). Viracocha the Creator came forth from the waters of Lake Titicaca and created the land and the sky before returning to the lake. He also created a race of people - in some versions of the story they were giants. These people and their leaders displeased Viracocha, so he came out of the lake again and flooded the world to destroy them. He also turned some of the men into stones. Then Viracocha created the Sun, Moon and stars.
Sounds like Genesis.
It does, doesn't it? Floods, Giants, the beginning being entirely darkness. There are parallels to Christianity found in many other belief systems.
Does the museum have later Matisse paintings in the collection?
We have paintings from 1906 and 1916-17, not on view right now, as well as many prints, but they are highly light-sensitive, so they are rarely displayed.
This painting was the first Matisse painting ever exhibited in New York, incidentally!
No kidding. That is really cool. Where was it first exhibited?
In a gallery at 291 5th Avenue, owned by the photographer Alfred Stieglitz. It's a physically small work, but it has a lot of presence, Matisse's color is so vibrant, and it has that interesting history! It was also included in the infamous "Armory Show" here in New York in 1913, the exhibition that introduced the NYC public to international modern art. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Have small plates, dinner, or drinks at The Norm restaurant and bar, led by Michelin-starred Chef Saul Bolton. Or stop by the BKM Café or Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group.

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me about Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl?
Sure! The artist Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl was originally from Germany and had a prolific career painting in the United States. He often painted watercolors and sketches of animals as well as works with allegorical themes.
That eye. I've seen it in so many places. Or eyes similar to that one... Any insight?
You are looking at the Wedjat eye! The Wedjat is a symbol of the Ancient Egyptian god Horus, who the king was thought to be the human embodiment of. The symbol is used as a protective measure in burials and funerary texts against evil forces. Horus is also shows as a falcon with wings outstretched. You'll see those two motifs repeat all throughout ancient Egyptian art
How did the artist get the paint to "come out" like that? Did the artist just dab large amounts of paint?
The effect you're noticing is called "impasto" coming from the Italian word for "mixture." It is a technique where paint is laid on an area of the surface very thickly, usually thickly enough that the brush or painting-knife strokes are visible. Artists at the time were drawn to this technique because it recorded the "action" of painting itself.
Richard Pousette-Dart actually created these large canvases that were densely packed with details from various cultures. He was inspired by Native American, African, and Oceanic art and wanted to convey transcendent spiritual truths.
Interesting...
I personally like getting really close, and then slowly taking small steps backwards to see new details emerge.
What and who is this?
That would be a sarcophagus lid carved of limestone. It was intended as a lid for a wealthy scribe and priest named Pa-di-Inpu. The very wealthy could afford stone sarcophagi, which have survived through the ages, whereas the less wealthy used wood or terra cotta for items in their tombs.
Why in Arabic?
Aha! Great question!
Mona Hatoum is the artist, and she likes to point at the idea of the youth in Arab countries, who are caught between action and inaction because of the political climates in their countries. "Waiting Is Forbidden" can be taken to mean no loitering.
Is she the photographer? Where are her pieces located?
She is a Canadian-based sculptor an most of her pieces are exhibited in Canada. Interestingly the artist hired a traditional sign-maker to create the work in the same format as a traditional Cairo street sign, which often has the name of the street written in two languages.
It's part of her series called "Cairo," where she also speaks about the immigrant journey, particularly for children and teenagers who stand between two different cultures.
Can you tell me some more about the painting titled The Root? Who are these people?
The figures are entirely fictional -- Lynette Yiadom-Boakye doesn't work with models. Instead she assembles images from scrapbooks, drawings, and her imagination.
Here's a quote from the artist that we find interesting: "The thing is that if you use a model, the painting becomes about capturing that particular person, and it’s disappointing if you can’t. I once tried to paint a friend, an incredible character, and it just wasn’t him. So moving away from that was to do with freedom.”
She paints quickly, completing the bulk of each canvas in a single day!
The label for this says Brooklyn waterfront is across. do you know where? Or is any of the businesses depicted here are still standing or in operation?
This painting depicts the OLD East River Park, which is now called "Carl Schurz Park." 
Oh. Where's that?
It's located on Manhattan's Upper East Side. If you looked out over the East River from this point today, you'd see Astoria, Queens. I used to live right in that area! You'd see brick apartment buildings and some warehouses from this vantage point.
Carl Schurz Park is located along FDR Drive in Manhattan, adjacent to the tip of Roosevelt Island.
Oh, I think I know it.
Most, if not all, of the buildings you see in this painting are long gone. There isn't much industry in the Astoria area any more as it has become quite residential.
Fun Fact: Carl Schurz Park is located near Gracie Mansion, where the mayor lives.
"A clever approach to representing depth, before the invention of perspective." When was perspective invented? And by whom?
In 1434/35, Leon Battista Alberti published the first major Renaissance treatise on perspective by Alberti based on ideas already known since antiquity.  At the same time, the great Florentine architect Brunelleschi (as in the dome of the cathedral) was experimenting in one point perspective. Prior to this, there were certainly attempts to create perspective but there was no scientific basis. It really was just artist trying to recreate nature. After Alberti it becomes scientific perspective as opposed to the earlier illusion of perspective.
Gothic art drew a lot of inspiration from Byzantine tile work, where figures can't appear to be behind each other, so they are stacked. Here the artist is stacking the figures to depict how a crowd of people might look.
Is the map suggesting that these areas share a common cultural or spiritual thread?
Did the Inca and Aztec share a common pantheon of gods?
The map is there to contextualize different tribes and peoples with current geo-political boundaries.
As for your second question, no, the Inca and Aztec didn't share much in terms of spiritual beliefs. The Aztec, reside in current day Mexico and northern Central America, whereas the Inca were based in South America. The Inca controlled almost the entire western region of South America extending from southern Colombia to central Chile.
There are similarities in their appreciation and execution of large building projects, but outside of that their gods and origin beliefs are very different. Would you care to know more?
Yes, please.
Okay! There is a fair amount of information, so let me start with the creation myths for both peoples.
The Aztecs believed that in the beginning was the void. It was at some ancient time in the Aztec creation story that the dual god, Ometecuhtli/Omecihuatl, created itself. This god was good and bad, chaos and order, male and female. Being male and female, it was able to have children. It had four, which came to represent the four directions of north, south, east and west.
The Inca believed that in the beginning, all was darkness and nothing existed (popular belief). Viracocha the Creator came forth from the waters of Lake Titicaca and created the land and the sky before returning to the lake. He also created a race of people - in some versions of the story they were giants. These people and their leaders displeased Viracocha, so he came out of the lake again and flooded the world to destroy them. He also turned some of the men into stones. Then Viracocha created the Sun, Moon and stars.
Sounds like Genesis.
It does, doesn't it? Floods, Giants, the beginning being entirely darkness. There are parallels to Christianity found in many other belief systems.
Does the museum have later Matisse paintings in the collection?
We have paintings from 1906 and 1916-17, not on view right now, as well as many prints, but they are highly light-sensitive, so they are rarely displayed.
This painting was the first Matisse painting ever exhibited in New York, incidentally!
No kidding. That is really cool. Where was it first exhibited?
In a gallery at 291 5th Avenue, owned by the photographer Alfred Stieglitz. It's a physically small work, but it has a lot of presence, Matisse's color is so vibrant, and it has that interesting history! It was also included in the infamous "Armory Show" here in New York in 1913, the exhibition that introduced the NYC public to international modern art. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me about Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl?
Sure! The artist Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl was originally from Germany and had a prolific career painting in the United States. He often painted watercolors and sketches of animals as well as works with allegorical themes.
That eye. I've seen it in so many places. Or eyes similar to that one... Any insight?
You are looking at the Wedjat eye! The Wedjat is a symbol of the Ancient Egyptian god Horus, who the king was thought to be the human embodiment of. The symbol is used as a protective measure in burials and funerary texts against evil forces. Horus is also shows as a falcon with wings outstretched. You'll see those two motifs repeat all throughout ancient Egyptian art
How did the artist get the paint to "come out" like that? Did the artist just dab large amounts of paint?
The effect you're noticing is called "impasto" coming from the Italian word for "mixture." It is a technique where paint is laid on an area of the surface very thickly, usually thickly enough that the brush or painting-knife strokes are visible. Artists at the time were drawn to this technique because it recorded the "action" of painting itself.
Richard Pousette-Dart actually created these large canvases that were densely packed with details from various cultures. He was inspired by Native American, African, and Oceanic art and wanted to convey transcendent spiritual truths.
Interesting...
I personally like getting really close, and then slowly taking small steps backwards to see new details emerge.
What and who is this?
That would be a sarcophagus lid carved of limestone. It was intended as a lid for a wealthy scribe and priest named Pa-di-Inpu. The very wealthy could afford stone sarcophagi, which have survived through the ages, whereas the less wealthy used wood or terra cotta for items in their tombs.
Why in Arabic?
Aha! Great question!
Mona Hatoum is the artist, and she likes to point at the idea of the youth in Arab countries, who are caught between action and inaction because of the political climates in their countries. "Waiting Is Forbidden" can be taken to mean no loitering.
Is she the photographer? Where are her pieces located?
She is a Canadian-based sculptor an most of her pieces are exhibited in Canada. Interestingly the artist hired a traditional sign-maker to create the work in the same format as a traditional Cairo street sign, which often has the name of the street written in two languages.
It's part of her series called "Cairo," where she also speaks about the immigrant journey, particularly for children and teenagers who stand between two different cultures.
Can you tell me some more about the painting titled The Root? Who are these people?
The figures are entirely fictional -- Lynette Yiadom-Boakye doesn't work with models. Instead she assembles images from scrapbooks, drawings, and her imagination.
Here's a quote from the artist that we find interesting: "The thing is that if you use a model, the painting becomes about capturing that particular person, and it’s disappointing if you can’t. I once tried to paint a friend, an incredible character, and it just wasn’t him. So moving away from that was to do with freedom.”
She paints quickly, completing the bulk of each canvas in a single day!
The label for this says Brooklyn waterfront is across. do you know where? Or is any of the businesses depicted here are still standing or in operation?
This painting depicts the OLD East River Park, which is now called "Carl Schurz Park." 
Oh. Where's that?
It's located on Manhattan's Upper East Side. If you looked out over the East River from this point today, you'd see Astoria, Queens. I used to live right in that area! You'd see brick apartment buildings and some warehouses from this vantage point.
Carl Schurz Park is located along FDR Drive in Manhattan, adjacent to the tip of Roosevelt Island.
Oh, I think I know it.
Most, if not all, of the buildings you see in this painting are long gone. There isn't much industry in the Astoria area any more as it has become quite residential.
Fun Fact: Carl Schurz Park is located near Gracie Mansion, where the mayor lives.
"A clever approach to representing depth, before the invention of perspective." When was perspective invented? And by whom?
In 1434/35, Leon Battista Alberti published the first major Renaissance treatise on perspective by Alberti based on ideas already known since antiquity.  At the same time, the great Florentine architect Brunelleschi (as in the dome of the cathedral) was experimenting in one point perspective. Prior to this, there were certainly attempts to create perspective but there was no scientific basis. It really was just artist trying to recreate nature. After Alberti it becomes scientific perspective as opposed to the earlier illusion of perspective.
Gothic art drew a lot of inspiration from Byzantine tile work, where figures can't appear to be behind each other, so they are stacked. Here the artist is stacking the figures to depict how a crowd of people might look.
Is the map suggesting that these areas share a common cultural or spiritual thread?
Did the Inca and Aztec share a common pantheon of gods?
The map is there to contextualize different tribes and peoples with current geo-political boundaries.
As for your second question, no, the Inca and Aztec didn't share much in terms of spiritual beliefs. The Aztec, reside in current day Mexico and northern Central America, whereas the Inca were based in South America. The Inca controlled almost the entire western region of South America extending from southern Colombia to central Chile.
There are similarities in their appreciation and execution of large building projects, but outside of that their gods and origin beliefs are very different. Would you care to know more?
Yes, please.
Okay! There is a fair amount of information, so let me start with the creation myths for both peoples.
The Aztecs believed that in the beginning was the void. It was at some ancient time in the Aztec creation story that the dual god, Ometecuhtli/Omecihuatl, created itself. This god was good and bad, chaos and order, male and female. Being male and female, it was able to have children. It had four, which came to represent the four directions of north, south, east and west.
The Inca believed that in the beginning, all was darkness and nothing existed (popular belief). Viracocha the Creator came forth from the waters of Lake Titicaca and created the land and the sky before returning to the lake. He also created a race of people - in some versions of the story they were giants. These people and their leaders displeased Viracocha, so he came out of the lake again and flooded the world to destroy them. He also turned some of the men into stones. Then Viracocha created the Sun, Moon and stars.
Sounds like Genesis.
It does, doesn't it? Floods, Giants, the beginning being entirely darkness. There are parallels to Christianity found in many other belief systems.
Does the museum have later Matisse paintings in the collection?
We have paintings from 1906 and 1916-17, not on view right now, as well as many prints, but they are highly light-sensitive, so they are rarely displayed.
This painting was the first Matisse painting ever exhibited in New York, incidentally!
No kidding. That is really cool. Where was it first exhibited?
In a gallery at 291 5th Avenue, owned by the photographer Alfred Stieglitz. It's a physically small work, but it has a lot of presence, Matisse's color is so vibrant, and it has that interesting history! It was also included in the infamous "Armory Show" here in New York in 1913, the exhibition that introduced the NYC public to international modern art. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me about Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl?
Sure! The artist Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl was originally from Germany and had a prolific career painting in the United States. He often painted watercolors and sketches of animals as well as works with allegorical themes.
That eye. I've seen it in so many places. Or eyes similar to that one... Any insight?
You are looking at the Wedjat eye! The Wedjat is a symbol of the Ancient Egyptian god Horus, who the king was thought to be the human embodiment of. The symbol is used as a protective measure in burials and funerary texts against evil forces. Horus is also shows as a falcon with wings outstretched. You'll see those two motifs repeat all throughout ancient Egyptian art
How did the artist get the paint to "come out" like that? Did the artist just dab large amounts of paint?
The effect you're noticing is called "impasto" coming from the Italian word for "mixture." It is a technique where paint is laid on an area of the surface very thickly, usually thickly enough that the brush or painting-knife strokes are visible. Artists at the time were drawn to this technique because it recorded the "action" of painting itself.
Richard Pousette-Dart actually created these large canvases that were densely packed with details from various cultures. He was inspired by Native American, African, and Oceanic art and wanted to convey transcendent spiritual truths.
Interesting...
I personally like getting really close, and then slowly taking small steps backwards to see new details emerge.
What and who is this?
That would be a sarcophagus lid carved of limestone. It was intended as a lid for a wealthy scribe and priest named Pa-di-Inpu. The very wealthy could afford stone sarcophagi, which have survived through the ages, whereas the less wealthy used wood or terra cotta for items in their tombs.
Why in Arabic?
Aha! Great question!
Mona Hatoum is the artist, and she likes to point at the idea of the youth in Arab countries, who are caught between action and inaction because of the political climates in their countries. "Waiting Is Forbidden" can be taken to mean no loitering.
Is she the photographer? Where are her pieces located?
She is a Canadian-based sculptor an most of her pieces are exhibited in Canada. Interestingly the artist hired a traditional sign-maker to create the work in the same format as a traditional Cairo street sign, which often has the name of the street written in two languages.
It's part of her series called "Cairo," where she also speaks about the immigrant journey, particularly for children and teenagers who stand between two different cultures.
Can you tell me some more about the painting titled The Root? Who are these people?
The figures are entirely fictional -- Lynette Yiadom-Boakye doesn't work with models. Instead she assembles images from scrapbooks, drawings, and her imagination.
Here's a quote from the artist that we find interesting: "The thing is that if you use a model, the painting becomes about capturing that particular person, and it’s disappointing if you can’t. I once tried to paint a friend, an incredible character, and it just wasn’t him. So moving away from that was to do with freedom.”
She paints quickly, completing the bulk of each canvas in a single day!
The label for this says Brooklyn waterfront is across. do you know where? Or is any of the businesses depicted here are still standing or in operation?
This painting depicts the OLD East River Park, which is now called "Carl Schurz Park." 
Oh. Where's that?
It's located on Manhattan's Upper East Side. If you looked out over the East River from this point today, you'd see Astoria, Queens. I used to live right in that area! You'd see brick apartment buildings and some warehouses from this vantage point.
Carl Schurz Park is located along FDR Drive in Manhattan, adjacent to the tip of Roosevelt Island.
Oh, I think I know it.
Most, if not all, of the buildings you see in this painting are long gone. There isn't much industry in the Astoria area any more as it has become quite residential.
Fun Fact: Carl Schurz Park is located near Gracie Mansion, where the mayor lives.
"A clever approach to representing depth, before the invention of perspective." When was perspective invented? And by whom?
In 1434/35, Leon Battista Alberti published the first major Renaissance treatise on perspective by Alberti based on ideas already known since antiquity.  At the same time, the great Florentine architect Brunelleschi (as in the dome of the cathedral) was experimenting in one point perspective. Prior to this, there were certainly attempts to create perspective but there was no scientific basis. It really was just artist trying to recreate nature. After Alberti it becomes scientific perspective as opposed to the earlier illusion of perspective.
Gothic art drew a lot of inspiration from Byzantine tile work, where figures can't appear to be behind each other, so they are stacked. Here the artist is stacking the figures to depict how a crowd of people might look.
Is the map suggesting that these areas share a common cultural or spiritual thread?
Did the Inca and Aztec share a common pantheon of gods?
The map is there to contextualize different tribes and peoples with current geo-political boundaries.
As for your second question, no, the Inca and Aztec didn't share much in terms of spiritual beliefs. The Aztec, reside in current day Mexico and northern Central America, whereas the Inca were based in South America. The Inca controlled almost the entire western region of South America extending from southern Colombia to central Chile.
There are similarities in their appreciation and execution of large building projects, but outside of that their gods and origin beliefs are very different. Would you care to know more?
Yes, please.
Okay! There is a fair amount of information, so let me start with the creation myths for both peoples.
The Aztecs believed that in the beginning was the void. It was at some ancient time in the Aztec creation story that the dual god, Ometecuhtli/Omecihuatl, created itself. This god was good and bad, chaos and order, male and female. Being male and female, it was able to have children. It had four, which came to represent the four directions of north, south, east and west.
The Inca believed that in the beginning, all was darkness and nothing existed (popular belief). Viracocha the Creator came forth from the waters of Lake Titicaca and created the land and the sky before returning to the lake. He also created a race of people - in some versions of the story they were giants. These people and their leaders displeased Viracocha, so he came out of the lake again and flooded the world to destroy them. He also turned some of the men into stones. Then Viracocha created the Sun, Moon and stars.
Sounds like Genesis.
It does, doesn't it? Floods, Giants, the beginning being entirely darkness. There are parallels to Christianity found in many other belief systems.
Does the museum have later Matisse paintings in the collection?
We have paintings from 1906 and 1916-17, not on view right now, as well as many prints, but they are highly light-sensitive, so they are rarely displayed.
This painting was the first Matisse painting ever exhibited in New York, incidentally!
No kidding. That is really cool. Where was it first exhibited?
In a gallery at 291 5th Avenue, owned by the photographer Alfred Stieglitz. It's a physically small work, but it has a lot of presence, Matisse's color is so vibrant, and it has that interesting history! It was also included in the infamous "Armory Show" here in New York in 1913, the exhibition that introduced the NYC public to international modern art. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (The Norm restaurant and bar; BKM Café and Bowl)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me about Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl?
Sure! The artist Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl was originally from Germany and had a prolific career painting in the United States. He often painted watercolors and sketches of animals as well as works with allegorical themes.
That eye. I've seen it in so many places. Or eyes similar to that one... Any insight?
You are looking at the Wedjat eye! The Wedjat is a symbol of the Ancient Egyptian god Horus, who the king was thought to be the human embodiment of. The symbol is used as a protective measure in burials and funerary texts against evil forces. Horus is also shows as a falcon with wings outstretched. You'll see those two motifs repeat all throughout ancient Egyptian art
How did the artist get the paint to "come out" like that? Did the artist just dab large amounts of paint?
The effect you're noticing is called "impasto" coming from the Italian word for "mixture." It is a technique where paint is laid on an area of the surface very thickly, usually thickly enough that the brush or painting-knife strokes are visible. Artists at the time were drawn to this technique because it recorded the "action" of painting itself.
Richard Pousette-Dart actually created these large canvases that were densely packed with details from various cultures. He was inspired by Native American, African, and Oceanic art and wanted to convey transcendent spiritual truths.
Interesting...
I personally like getting really close, and then slowly taking small steps backwards to see new details emerge.
What and who is this?
That would be a sarcophagus lid carved of limestone. It was intended as a lid for a wealthy scribe and priest named Pa-di-Inpu. The very wealthy could afford stone sarcophagi, which have survived through the ages, whereas the less wealthy used wood or terra cotta for items in their tombs.
Why in Arabic?
Aha! Great question!
Mona Hatoum is the artist, and she likes to point at the idea of the youth in Arab countries, who are caught between action and inaction because of the political climates in their countries. "Waiting Is Forbidden" can be taken to mean no loitering.
Is she the photographer? Where are her pieces located?
She is a Canadian-based sculptor an most of her pieces are exhibited in Canada. Interestingly the artist hired a traditional sign-maker to create the work in the same format as a traditional Cairo street sign, which often has the name of the street written in two languages.
It's part of her series called "Cairo," where she also speaks about the immigrant journey, particularly for children and teenagers who stand between two different cultures.
Can you tell me some more about the painting titled The Root? Who are these people?
The figures are entirely fictional -- Lynette Yiadom-Boakye doesn't work with models. Instead she assembles images from scrapbooks, drawings, and her imagination.
Here's a quote from the artist that we find interesting: "The thing is that if you use a model, the painting becomes about capturing that particular person, and it’s disappointing if you can’t. I once tried to paint a friend, an incredible character, and it just wasn’t him. So moving away from that was to do with freedom.”
She paints quickly, completing the bulk of each canvas in a single day!
The label for this says Brooklyn waterfront is across. do you know where? Or is any of the businesses depicted here are still standing or in operation?
This painting depicts the OLD East River Park, which is now called "Carl Schurz Park." 
Oh. Where's that?
It's located on Manhattan's Upper East Side. If you looked out over the East River from this point today, you'd see Astoria, Queens. I used to live right in that area! You'd see brick apartment buildings and some warehouses from this vantage point.
Carl Schurz Park is located along FDR Drive in Manhattan, adjacent to the tip of Roosevelt Island.
Oh, I think I know it.
Most, if not all, of the buildings you see in this painting are long gone. There isn't much industry in the Astoria area any more as it has become quite residential.
Fun Fact: Carl Schurz Park is located near Gracie Mansion, where the mayor lives.
"A clever approach to representing depth, before the invention of perspective." When was perspective invented? And by whom?
In 1434/35, Leon Battista Alberti published the first major Renaissance treatise on perspective by Alberti based on ideas already known since antiquity.  At the same time, the great Florentine architect Brunelleschi (as in the dome of the cathedral) was experimenting in one point perspective. Prior to this, there were certainly attempts to create perspective but there was no scientific basis. It really was just artist trying to recreate nature. After Alberti it becomes scientific perspective as opposed to the earlier illusion of perspective.
Gothic art drew a lot of inspiration from Byzantine tile work, where figures can't appear to be behind each other, so they are stacked. Here the artist is stacking the figures to depict how a crowd of people might look.
Is the map suggesting that these areas share a common cultural or spiritual thread?
Did the Inca and Aztec share a common pantheon of gods?
The map is there to contextualize different tribes and peoples with current geo-political boundaries.
As for your second question, no, the Inca and Aztec didn't share much in terms of spiritual beliefs. The Aztec, reside in current day Mexico and northern Central America, whereas the Inca were based in South America. The Inca controlled almost the entire western region of South America extending from southern Colombia to central Chile.
There are similarities in their appreciation and execution of large building projects, but outside of that their gods and origin beliefs are very different. Would you care to know more?
Yes, please.
Okay! There is a fair amount of information, so let me start with the creation myths for both peoples.
The Aztecs believed that in the beginning was the void. It was at some ancient time in the Aztec creation story that the dual god, Ometecuhtli/Omecihuatl, created itself. This god was good and bad, chaos and order, male and female. Being male and female, it was able to have children. It had four, which came to represent the four directions of north, south, east and west.
The Inca believed that in the beginning, all was darkness and nothing existed (popular belief). Viracocha the Creator came forth from the waters of Lake Titicaca and created the land and the sky before returning to the lake. He also created a race of people - in some versions of the story they were giants. These people and their leaders displeased Viracocha, so he came out of the lake again and flooded the world to destroy them. He also turned some of the men into stones. Then Viracocha created the Sun, Moon and stars.
Sounds like Genesis.
It does, doesn't it? Floods, Giants, the beginning being entirely darkness. There are parallels to Christianity found in many other belief systems.
Does the museum have later Matisse paintings in the collection?
We have paintings from 1906 and 1916-17, not on view right now, as well as many prints, but they are highly light-sensitive, so they are rarely displayed.
This painting was the first Matisse painting ever exhibited in New York, incidentally!
No kidding. That is really cool. Where was it first exhibited?
In a gallery at 291 5th Avenue, owned by the photographer Alfred Stieglitz. It's a physically small work, but it has a lot of presence, Matisse's color is so vibrant, and it has that interesting history! It was also included in the infamous "Armory Show" here in New York in 1913, the exhibition that introduced the NYC public to international modern art. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me about Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl?
Sure! The artist Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl was originally from Germany and had a prolific career painting in the United States. He often painted watercolors and sketches of animals as well as works with allegorical themes.
That eye. I've seen it in so many places. Or eyes similar to that one... Any insight?
You are looking at the Wedjat eye! The Wedjat is a symbol of the Ancient Egyptian god Horus, who the king was thought to be the human embodiment of. The symbol is used as a protective measure in burials and funerary texts against evil forces. Horus is also shows as a falcon with wings outstretched. You'll see those two motifs repeat all throughout ancient Egyptian art
How did the artist get the paint to "come out" like that? Did the artist just dab large amounts of paint?
The effect you're noticing is called "impasto" coming from the Italian word for "mixture." It is a technique where paint is laid on an area of the surface very thickly, usually thickly enough that the brush or painting-knife strokes are visible. Artists at the time were drawn to this technique because it recorded the "action" of painting itself.
Richard Pousette-Dart actually created these large canvases that were densely packed with details from various cultures. He was inspired by Native American, African, and Oceanic art and wanted to convey transcendent spiritual truths.
Interesting...
I personally like getting really close, and then slowly taking small steps backwards to see new details emerge.
What and who is this?
That would be a sarcophagus lid carved of limestone. It was intended as a lid for a wealthy scribe and priest named Pa-di-Inpu. The very wealthy could afford stone sarcophagi, which have survived through the ages, whereas the less wealthy used wood or terra cotta for items in their tombs.
Why in Arabic?
Aha! Great question!
Mona Hatoum is the artist, and she likes to point at the idea of the youth in Arab countries, who are caught between action and inaction because of the political climates in their countries. "Waiting Is Forbidden" can be taken to mean no loitering.
Is she the photographer? Where are her pieces located?
She is a Canadian-based sculptor an most of her pieces are exhibited in Canada. Interestingly the artist hired a traditional sign-maker to create the work in the same format as a traditional Cairo street sign, which often has the name of the street written in two languages.
It's part of her series called "Cairo," where she also speaks about the immigrant journey, particularly for children and teenagers who stand between two different cultures.
Can you tell me some more about the painting titled The Root? Who are these people?
The figures are entirely fictional -- Lynette Yiadom-Boakye doesn't work with models. Instead she assembles images from scrapbooks, drawings, and her imagination.
Here's a quote from the artist that we find interesting: "The thing is that if you use a model, the painting becomes about capturing that particular person, and it’s disappointing if you can’t. I once tried to paint a friend, an incredible character, and it just wasn’t him. So moving away from that was to do with freedom.”
She paints quickly, completing the bulk of each canvas in a single day!
The label for this says Brooklyn waterfront is across. do you know where? Or is any of the businesses depicted here are still standing or in operation?
This painting depicts the OLD East River Park, which is now called "Carl Schurz Park." 
Oh. Where's that?
It's located on Manhattan's Upper East Side. If you looked out over the East River from this point today, you'd see Astoria, Queens. I used to live right in that area! You'd see brick apartment buildings and some warehouses from this vantage point.
Carl Schurz Park is located along FDR Drive in Manhattan, adjacent to the tip of Roosevelt Island.
Oh, I think I know it.
Most, if not all, of the buildings you see in this painting are long gone. There isn't much industry in the Astoria area any more as it has become quite residential.
Fun Fact: Carl Schurz Park is located near Gracie Mansion, where the mayor lives.
"A clever approach to representing depth, before the invention of perspective." When was perspective invented? And by whom?
In 1434/35, Leon Battista Alberti published the first major Renaissance treatise on perspective by Alberti based on ideas already known since antiquity.  At the same time, the great Florentine architect Brunelleschi (as in the dome of the cathedral) was experimenting in one point perspective. Prior to this, there were certainly attempts to create perspective but there was no scientific basis. It really was just artist trying to recreate nature. After Alberti it becomes scientific perspective as opposed to the earlier illusion of perspective.
Gothic art drew a lot of inspiration from Byzantine tile work, where figures can't appear to be behind each other, so they are stacked. Here the artist is stacking the figures to depict how a crowd of people might look.
Is the map suggesting that these areas share a common cultural or spiritual thread?
Did the Inca and Aztec share a common pantheon of gods?
The map is there to contextualize different tribes and peoples with current geo-political boundaries.
As for your second question, no, the Inca and Aztec didn't share much in terms of spiritual beliefs. The Aztec, reside in current day Mexico and northern Central America, whereas the Inca were based in South America. The Inca controlled almost the entire western region of South America extending from southern Colombia to central Chile.
There are similarities in their appreciation and execution of large building projects, but outside of that their gods and origin beliefs are very different. Would you care to know more?
Yes, please.
Okay! There is a fair amount of information, so let me start with the creation myths for both peoples.
The Aztecs believed that in the beginning was the void. It was at some ancient time in the Aztec creation story that the dual god, Ometecuhtli/Omecihuatl, created itself. This god was good and bad, chaos and order, male and female. Being male and female, it was able to have children. It had four, which came to represent the four directions of north, south, east and west.
The Inca believed that in the beginning, all was darkness and nothing existed (popular belief). Viracocha the Creator came forth from the waters of Lake Titicaca and created the land and the sky before returning to the lake. He also created a race of people - in some versions of the story they were giants. These people and their leaders displeased Viracocha, so he came out of the lake again and flooded the world to destroy them. He also turned some of the men into stones. Then Viracocha created the Sun, Moon and stars.
Sounds like Genesis.
It does, doesn't it? Floods, Giants, the beginning being entirely darkness. There are parallels to Christianity found in many other belief systems.
Does the museum have later Matisse paintings in the collection?
We have paintings from 1906 and 1916-17, not on view right now, as well as many prints, but they are highly light-sensitive, so they are rarely displayed.
This painting was the first Matisse painting ever exhibited in New York, incidentally!
No kidding. That is really cool. Where was it first exhibited?
In a gallery at 291 5th Avenue, owned by the photographer Alfred Stieglitz. It's a physically small work, but it has a lot of presence, Matisse's color is so vibrant, and it has that interesting history! It was also included in the infamous "Armory Show" here in New York in 1913, the exhibition that introduced the NYC public to international modern art. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me about Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl?
Sure! The artist Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl was originally from Germany and had a prolific career painting in the United States. He often painted watercolors and sketches of animals as well as works with allegorical themes.
That eye. I've seen it in so many places. Or eyes similar to that one... Any insight?
You are looking at the Wedjat eye! The Wedjat is a symbol of the Ancient Egyptian god Horus, who the king was thought to be the human embodiment of. The symbol is used as a protective measure in burials and funerary texts against evil forces. Horus is also shows as a falcon with wings outstretched. You'll see those two motifs repeat all throughout ancient Egyptian art
How did the artist get the paint to "come out" like that? Did the artist just dab large amounts of paint?
The effect you're noticing is called "impasto" coming from the Italian word for "mixture." It is a technique where paint is laid on an area of the surface very thickly, usually thickly enough that the brush or painting-knife strokes are visible. Artists at the time were drawn to this technique because it recorded the "action" of painting itself.
Richard Pousette-Dart actually created these large canvases that were densely packed with details from various cultures. He was inspired by Native American, African, and Oceanic art and wanted to convey transcendent spiritual truths.
Interesting...
I personally like getting really close, and then slowly taking small steps backwards to see new details emerge.
What and who is this?
That would be a sarcophagus lid carved of limestone. It was intended as a lid for a wealthy scribe and priest named Pa-di-Inpu. The very wealthy could afford stone sarcophagi, which have survived through the ages, whereas the less wealthy used wood or terra cotta for items in their tombs.
Why in Arabic?
Aha! Great question!
Mona Hatoum is the artist, and she likes to point at the idea of the youth in Arab countries, who are caught between action and inaction because of the political climates in their countries. "Waiting Is Forbidden" can be taken to mean no loitering.
Is she the photographer? Where are her pieces located?
She is a Canadian-based sculptor an most of her pieces are exhibited in Canada. Interestingly the artist hired a traditional sign-maker to create the work in the same format as a traditional Cairo street sign, which often has the name of the street written in two languages.
It's part of her series called "Cairo," where she also speaks about the immigrant journey, particularly for children and teenagers who stand between two different cultures.
Can you tell me some more about the painting titled The Root? Who are these people?
The figures are entirely fictional -- Lynette Yiadom-Boakye doesn't work with models. Instead she assembles images from scrapbooks, drawings, and her imagination.
Here's a quote from the artist that we find interesting: "The thing is that if you use a model, the painting becomes about capturing that particular person, and it’s disappointing if you can’t. I once tried to paint a friend, an incredible character, and it just wasn’t him. So moving away from that was to do with freedom.”
She paints quickly, completing the bulk of each canvas in a single day!
The label for this says Brooklyn waterfront is across. do you know where? Or is any of the businesses depicted here are still standing or in operation?
This painting depicts the OLD East River Park, which is now called "Carl Schurz Park." 
Oh. Where's that?
It's located on Manhattan's Upper East Side. If you looked out over the East River from this point today, you'd see Astoria, Queens. I used to live right in that area! You'd see brick apartment buildings and some warehouses from this vantage point.
Carl Schurz Park is located along FDR Drive in Manhattan, adjacent to the tip of Roosevelt Island.
Oh, I think I know it.
Most, if not all, of the buildings you see in this painting are long gone. There isn't much industry in the Astoria area any more as it has become quite residential.
Fun Fact: Carl Schurz Park is located near Gracie Mansion, where the mayor lives.
"A clever approach to representing depth, before the invention of perspective." When was perspective invented? And by whom?
In 1434/35, Leon Battista Alberti published the first major Renaissance treatise on perspective by Alberti based on ideas already known since antiquity.  At the same time, the great Florentine architect Brunelleschi (as in the dome of the cathedral) was experimenting in one point perspective. Prior to this, there were certainly attempts to create perspective but there was no scientific basis. It really was just artist trying to recreate nature. After Alberti it becomes scientific perspective as opposed to the earlier illusion of perspective.
Gothic art drew a lot of inspiration from Byzantine tile work, where figures can't appear to be behind each other, so they are stacked. Here the artist is stacking the figures to depict how a crowd of people might look.
Is the map suggesting that these areas share a common cultural or spiritual thread?
Did the Inca and Aztec share a common pantheon of gods?
The map is there to contextualize different tribes and peoples with current geo-political boundaries.
As for your second question, no, the Inca and Aztec didn't share much in terms of spiritual beliefs. The Aztec, reside in current day Mexico and northern Central America, whereas the Inca were based in South America. The Inca controlled almost the entire western region of South America extending from southern Colombia to central Chile.
There are similarities in their appreciation and execution of large building projects, but outside of that their gods and origin beliefs are very different. Would you care to know more?
Yes, please.
Okay! There is a fair amount of information, so let me start with the creation myths for both peoples.
The Aztecs believed that in the beginning was the void. It was at some ancient time in the Aztec creation story that the dual god, Ometecuhtli/Omecihuatl, created itself. This god was good and bad, chaos and order, male and female. Being male and female, it was able to have children. It had four, which came to represent the four directions of north, south, east and west.
The Inca believed that in the beginning, all was darkness and nothing existed (popular belief). Viracocha the Creator came forth from the waters of Lake Titicaca and created the land and the sky before returning to the lake. He also created a race of people - in some versions of the story they were giants. These people and their leaders displeased Viracocha, so he came out of the lake again and flooded the world to destroy them. He also turned some of the men into stones. Then Viracocha created the Sun, Moon and stars.
Sounds like Genesis.
It does, doesn't it? Floods, Giants, the beginning being entirely darkness. There are parallels to Christianity found in many other belief systems.
Does the museum have later Matisse paintings in the collection?
We have paintings from 1906 and 1916-17, not on view right now, as well as many prints, but they are highly light-sensitive, so they are rarely displayed.
This painting was the first Matisse painting ever exhibited in New York, incidentally!
No kidding. That is really cool. Where was it first exhibited?
In a gallery at 291 5th Avenue, owned by the photographer Alfred Stieglitz. It's a physically small work, but it has a lot of presence, Matisse's color is so vibrant, and it has that interesting history! It was also included in the infamous "Armory Show" here in New York in 1913, the exhibition that introduced the NYC public to international modern art. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me about Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl?
Sure! The artist Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl was originally from Germany and had a prolific career painting in the United States. He often painted watercolors and sketches of animals as well as works with allegorical themes.
That eye. I've seen it in so many places. Or eyes similar to that one... Any insight?
You are looking at the Wedjat eye! The Wedjat is a symbol of the Ancient Egyptian god Horus, who the king was thought to be the human embodiment of. The symbol is used as a protective measure in burials and funerary texts against evil forces. Horus is also shows as a falcon with wings outstretched. You'll see those two motifs repeat all throughout ancient Egyptian art
How did the artist get the paint to "come out" like that? Did the artist just dab large amounts of paint?
The effect you're noticing is called "impasto" coming from the Italian word for "mixture." It is a technique where paint is laid on an area of the surface very thickly, usually thickly enough that the brush or painting-knife strokes are visible. Artists at the time were drawn to this technique because it recorded the "action" of painting itself.
Richard Pousette-Dart actually created these large canvases that were densely packed with details from various cultures. He was inspired by Native American, African, and Oceanic art and wanted to convey transcendent spiritual truths.
Interesting...
I personally like getting really close, and then slowly taking small steps backwards to see new details emerge.
What and who is this?
That would be a sarcophagus lid carved of limestone. It was intended as a lid for a wealthy scribe and priest named Pa-di-Inpu. The very wealthy could afford stone sarcophagi, which have survived through the ages, whereas the less wealthy used wood or terra cotta for items in their tombs.
Why in Arabic?
Aha! Great question!
Mona Hatoum is the artist, and she likes to point at the idea of the youth in Arab countries, who are caught between action and inaction because of the political climates in their countries. "Waiting Is Forbidden" can be taken to mean no loitering.
Is she the photographer? Where are her pieces located?
She is a Canadian-based sculptor an most of her pieces are exhibited in Canada. Interestingly the artist hired a traditional sign-maker to create the work in the same format as a traditional Cairo street sign, which often has the name of the street written in two languages.
It's part of her series called "Cairo," where she also speaks about the immigrant journey, particularly for children and teenagers who stand between two different cultures.
Can you tell me some more about the painting titled The Root? Who are these people?
The figures are entirely fictional -- Lynette Yiadom-Boakye doesn't work with models. Instead she assembles images from scrapbooks, drawings, and her imagination.
Here's a quote from the artist that we find interesting: "The thing is that if you use a model, the painting becomes about capturing that particular person, and it’s disappointing if you can’t. I once tried to paint a friend, an incredible character, and it just wasn’t him. So moving away from that was to do with freedom.”
She paints quickly, completing the bulk of each canvas in a single day!
The label for this says Brooklyn waterfront is across. do you know where? Or is any of the businesses depicted here are still standing or in operation?
This painting depicts the OLD East River Park, which is now called "Carl Schurz Park." 
Oh. Where's that?
It's located on Manhattan's Upper East Side. If you looked out over the East River from this point today, you'd see Astoria, Queens. I used to live right in that area! You'd see brick apartment buildings and some warehouses from this vantage point.
Carl Schurz Park is located along FDR Drive in Manhattan, adjacent to the tip of Roosevelt Island.
Oh, I think I know it.
Most, if not all, of the buildings you see in this painting are long gone. There isn't much industry in the Astoria area any more as it has become quite residential.
Fun Fact: Carl Schurz Park is located near Gracie Mansion, where the mayor lives.
"A clever approach to representing depth, before the invention of perspective." When was perspective invented? And by whom?
In 1434/35, Leon Battista Alberti published the first major Renaissance treatise on perspective by Alberti based on ideas already known since antiquity.  At the same time, the great Florentine architect Brunelleschi (as in the dome of the cathedral) was experimenting in one point perspective. Prior to this, there were certainly attempts to create perspective but there was no scientific basis. It really was just artist trying to recreate nature. After Alberti it becomes scientific perspective as opposed to the earlier illusion of perspective.
Gothic art drew a lot of inspiration from Byzantine tile work, where figures can't appear to be behind each other, so they are stacked. Here the artist is stacking the figures to depict how a crowd of people might look.
Is the map suggesting that these areas share a common cultural or spiritual thread?
Did the Inca and Aztec share a common pantheon of gods?
The map is there to contextualize different tribes and peoples with current geo-political boundaries.
As for your second question, no, the Inca and Aztec didn't share much in terms of spiritual beliefs. The Aztec, reside in current day Mexico and northern Central America, whereas the Inca were based in South America. The Inca controlled almost the entire western region of South America extending from southern Colombia to central Chile.
There are similarities in their appreciation and execution of large building projects, but outside of that their gods and origin beliefs are very different. Would you care to know more?
Yes, please.
Okay! There is a fair amount of information, so let me start with the creation myths for both peoples.
The Aztecs believed that in the beginning was the void. It was at some ancient time in the Aztec creation story that the dual god, Ometecuhtli/Omecihuatl, created itself. This god was good and bad, chaos and order, male and female. Being male and female, it was able to have children. It had four, which came to represent the four directions of north, south, east and west.
The Inca believed that in the beginning, all was darkness and nothing existed (popular belief). Viracocha the Creator came forth from the waters of Lake Titicaca and created the land and the sky before returning to the lake. He also created a race of people - in some versions of the story they were giants. These people and their leaders displeased Viracocha, so he came out of the lake again and flooded the world to destroy them. He also turned some of the men into stones. Then Viracocha created the Sun, Moon and stars.
Sounds like Genesis.
It does, doesn't it? Floods, Giants, the beginning being entirely darkness. There are parallels to Christianity found in many other belief systems.
Does the museum have later Matisse paintings in the collection?
We have paintings from 1906 and 1916-17, not on view right now, as well as many prints, but they are highly light-sensitive, so they are rarely displayed.
This painting was the first Matisse painting ever exhibited in New York, incidentally!
No kidding. That is really cool. Where was it first exhibited?
In a gallery at 291 5th Avenue, owned by the photographer Alfred Stieglitz. It's a physically small work, but it has a lot of presence, Matisse's color is so vibrant, and it has that interesting history! It was also included in the infamous "Armory Show" here in New York in 1913, the exhibition that introduced the NYC public to international modern art. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me about Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl?
Sure! The artist Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl was originally from Germany and had a prolific career painting in the United States. He often painted watercolors and sketches of animals as well as works with allegorical themes.
That eye. I've seen it in so many places. Or eyes similar to that one... Any insight?
You are looking at the Wedjat eye! The Wedjat is a symbol of the Ancient Egyptian god Horus, who the king was thought to be the human embodiment of. The symbol is used as a protective measure in burials and funerary texts against evil forces. Horus is also shows as a falcon with wings outstretched. You'll see those two motifs repeat all throughout ancient Egyptian art
How did the artist get the paint to "come out" like that? Did the artist just dab large amounts of paint?
The effect you're noticing is called "impasto" coming from the Italian word for "mixture." It is a technique where paint is laid on an area of the surface very thickly, usually thickly enough that the brush or painting-knife strokes are visible. Artists at the time were drawn to this technique because it recorded the "action" of painting itself.
Richard Pousette-Dart actually created these large canvases that were densely packed with details from various cultures. He was inspired by Native American, African, and Oceanic art and wanted to convey transcendent spiritual truths.
Interesting...
I personally like getting really close, and then slowly taking small steps backwards to see new details emerge.
What and who is this?
That would be a sarcophagus lid carved of limestone. It was intended as a lid for a wealthy scribe and priest named Pa-di-Inpu. The very wealthy could afford stone sarcophagi, which have survived through the ages, whereas the less wealthy used wood or terra cotta for items in their tombs.
Why in Arabic?
Aha! Great question!
Mona Hatoum is the artist, and she likes to point at the idea of the youth in Arab countries, who are caught between action and inaction because of the political climates in their countries. "Waiting Is Forbidden" can be taken to mean no loitering.
Is she the photographer? Where are her pieces located?
She is a Canadian-based sculptor an most of her pieces are exhibited in Canada. Interestingly the artist hired a traditional sign-maker to create the work in the same format as a traditional Cairo street sign, which often has the name of the street written in two languages.
It's part of her series called "Cairo," where she also speaks about the immigrant journey, particularly for children and teenagers who stand between two different cultures.
Can you tell me some more about the painting titled The Root? Who are these people?
The figures are entirely fictional -- Lynette Yiadom-Boakye doesn't work with models. Instead she assembles images from scrapbooks, drawings, and her imagination.
Here's a quote from the artist that we find interesting: "The thing is that if you use a model, the painting becomes about capturing that particular person, and it’s disappointing if you can’t. I once tried to paint a friend, an incredible character, and it just wasn’t him. So moving away from that was to do with freedom.”
She paints quickly, completing the bulk of each canvas in a single day!
The label for this says Brooklyn waterfront is across. do you know where? Or is any of the businesses depicted here are still standing or in operation?
This painting depicts the OLD East River Park, which is now called "Carl Schurz Park." 
Oh. Where's that?
It's located on Manhattan's Upper East Side. If you looked out over the East River from this point today, you'd see Astoria, Queens. I used to live right in that area! You'd see brick apartment buildings and some warehouses from this vantage point.
Carl Schurz Park is located along FDR Drive in Manhattan, adjacent to the tip of Roosevelt Island.
Oh, I think I know it.
Most, if not all, of the buildings you see in this painting are long gone. There isn't much industry in the Astoria area any more as it has become quite residential.
Fun Fact: Carl Schurz Park is located near Gracie Mansion, where the mayor lives.
"A clever approach to representing depth, before the invention of perspective." When was perspective invented? And by whom?
In 1434/35, Leon Battista Alberti published the first major Renaissance treatise on perspective by Alberti based on ideas already known since antiquity.  At the same time, the great Florentine architect Brunelleschi (as in the dome of the cathedral) was experimenting in one point perspective. Prior to this, there were certainly attempts to create perspective but there was no scientific basis. It really was just artist trying to recreate nature. After Alberti it becomes scientific perspective as opposed to the earlier illusion of perspective.
Gothic art drew a lot of inspiration from Byzantine tile work, where figures can't appear to be behind each other, so they are stacked. Here the artist is stacking the figures to depict how a crowd of people might look.
Is the map suggesting that these areas share a common cultural or spiritual thread?
Did the Inca and Aztec share a common pantheon of gods?
The map is there to contextualize different tribes and peoples with current geo-political boundaries.
As for your second question, no, the Inca and Aztec didn't share much in terms of spiritual beliefs. The Aztec, reside in current day Mexico and northern Central America, whereas the Inca were based in South America. The Inca controlled almost the entire western region of South America extending from southern Colombia to central Chile.
There are similarities in their appreciation and execution of large building projects, but outside of that their gods and origin beliefs are very different. Would you care to know more?
Yes, please.
Okay! There is a fair amount of information, so let me start with the creation myths for both peoples.
The Aztecs believed that in the beginning was the void. It was at some ancient time in the Aztec creation story that the dual god, Ometecuhtli/Omecihuatl, created itself. This god was good and bad, chaos and order, male and female. Being male and female, it was able to have children. It had four, which came to represent the four directions of north, south, east and west.
The Inca believed that in the beginning, all was darkness and nothing existed (popular belief). Viracocha the Creator came forth from the waters of Lake Titicaca and created the land and the sky before returning to the lake. He also created a race of people - in some versions of the story they were giants. These people and their leaders displeased Viracocha, so he came out of the lake again and flooded the world to destroy them. He also turned some of the men into stones. Then Viracocha created the Sun, Moon and stars.
Sounds like Genesis.
It does, doesn't it? Floods, Giants, the beginning being entirely darkness. There are parallels to Christianity found in many other belief systems.
Does the museum have later Matisse paintings in the collection?
We have paintings from 1906 and 1916-17, not on view right now, as well as many prints, but they are highly light-sensitive, so they are rarely displayed.
This painting was the first Matisse painting ever exhibited in New York, incidentally!
No kidding. That is really cool. Where was it first exhibited?
In a gallery at 291 5th Avenue, owned by the photographer Alfred Stieglitz. It's a physically small work, but it has a lot of presence, Matisse's color is so vibrant, and it has that interesting history! It was also included in the infamous "Armory Show" here in New York in 1913, the exhibition that introduced the NYC public to international modern art. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me about Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl?
Sure! The artist Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl was originally from Germany and had a prolific career painting in the United States. He often painted watercolors and sketches of animals as well as works with allegorical themes.
That eye. I've seen it in so many places. Or eyes similar to that one... Any insight?
You are looking at the Wedjat eye! The Wedjat is a symbol of the Ancient Egyptian god Horus, who the king was thought to be the human embodiment of. The symbol is used as a protective measure in burials and funerary texts against evil forces. Horus is also shows as a falcon with wings outstretched. You'll see those two motifs repeat all throughout ancient Egyptian art
How did the artist get the paint to "come out" like that? Did the artist just dab large amounts of paint?
The effect you're noticing is called "impasto" coming from the Italian word for "mixture." It is a technique where paint is laid on an area of the surface very thickly, usually thickly enough that the brush or painting-knife strokes are visible. Artists at the time were drawn to this technique because it recorded the "action" of painting itself.
Richard Pousette-Dart actually created these large canvases that were densely packed with details from various cultures. He was inspired by Native American, African, and Oceanic art and wanted to convey transcendent spiritual truths.
Interesting...
I personally like getting really close, and then slowly taking small steps backwards to see new details emerge.
What and who is this?
That would be a sarcophagus lid carved of limestone. It was intended as a lid for a wealthy scribe and priest named Pa-di-Inpu. The very wealthy could afford stone sarcophagi, which have survived through the ages, whereas the less wealthy used wood or terra cotta for items in their tombs.
Why in Arabic?
Aha! Great question!
Mona Hatoum is the artist, and she likes to point at the idea of the youth in Arab countries, who are caught between action and inaction because of the political climates in their countries. "Waiting Is Forbidden" can be taken to mean no loitering.
Is she the photographer? Where are her pieces located?
She is a Canadian-based sculptor an most of her pieces are exhibited in Canada. Interestingly the artist hired a traditional sign-maker to create the work in the same format as a traditional Cairo street sign, which often has the name of the street written in two languages.
It's part of her series called "Cairo," where she also speaks about the immigrant journey, particularly for children and teenagers who stand between two different cultures.
Can you tell me some more about the painting titled The Root? Who are these people?
The figures are entirely fictional -- Lynette Yiadom-Boakye doesn't work with models. Instead she assembles images from scrapbooks, drawings, and her imagination.
Here's a quote from the artist that we find interesting: "The thing is that if you use a model, the painting becomes about capturing that particular person, and it’s disappointing if you can’t. I once tried to paint a friend, an incredible character, and it just wasn’t him. So moving away from that was to do with freedom.”
She paints quickly, completing the bulk of each canvas in a single day!
The label for this says Brooklyn waterfront is across. do you know where? Or is any of the businesses depicted here are still standing or in operation?
This painting depicts the OLD East River Park, which is now called "Carl Schurz Park." 
Oh. Where's that?
It's located on Manhattan's Upper East Side. If you looked out over the East River from this point today, you'd see Astoria, Queens. I used to live right in that area! You'd see brick apartment buildings and some warehouses from this vantage point.
Carl Schurz Park is located along FDR Drive in Manhattan, adjacent to the tip of Roosevelt Island.
Oh, I think I know it.
Most, if not all, of the buildings you see in this painting are long gone. There isn't much industry in the Astoria area any more as it has become quite residential.
Fun Fact: Carl Schurz Park is located near Gracie Mansion, where the mayor lives.
"A clever approach to representing depth, before the invention of perspective." When was perspective invented? And by whom?
In 1434/35, Leon Battista Alberti published the first major Renaissance treatise on perspective by Alberti based on ideas already known since antiquity.  At the same time, the great Florentine architect Brunelleschi (as in the dome of the cathedral) was experimenting in one point perspective. Prior to this, there were certainly attempts to create perspective but there was no scientific basis. It really was just artist trying to recreate nature. After Alberti it becomes scientific perspective as opposed to the earlier illusion of perspective.
Gothic art drew a lot of inspiration from Byzantine tile work, where figures can't appear to be behind each other, so they are stacked. Here the artist is stacking the figures to depict how a crowd of people might look.
Is the map suggesting that these areas share a common cultural or spiritual thread?
Did the Inca and Aztec share a common pantheon of gods?
The map is there to contextualize different tribes and peoples with current geo-political boundaries.
As for your second question, no, the Inca and Aztec didn't share much in terms of spiritual beliefs. The Aztec, reside in current day Mexico and northern Central America, whereas the Inca were based in South America. The Inca controlled almost the entire western region of South America extending from southern Colombia to central Chile.
There are similarities in their appreciation and execution of large building projects, but outside of that their gods and origin beliefs are very different. Would you care to know more?
Yes, please.
Okay! There is a fair amount of information, so let me start with the creation myths for both peoples.
The Aztecs believed that in the beginning was the void. It was at some ancient time in the Aztec creation story that the dual god, Ometecuhtli/Omecihuatl, created itself. This god was good and bad, chaos and order, male and female. Being male and female, it was able to have children. It had four, which came to represent the four directions of north, south, east and west.
The Inca believed that in the beginning, all was darkness and nothing existed (popular belief). Viracocha the Creator came forth from the waters of Lake Titicaca and created the land and the sky before returning to the lake. He also created a race of people - in some versions of the story they were giants. These people and their leaders displeased Viracocha, so he came out of the lake again and flooded the world to destroy them. He also turned some of the men into stones. Then Viracocha created the Sun, Moon and stars.
Sounds like Genesis.
It does, doesn't it? Floods, Giants, the beginning being entirely darkness. There are parallels to Christianity found in many other belief systems.
Does the museum have later Matisse paintings in the collection?
We have paintings from 1906 and 1916-17, not on view right now, as well as many prints, but they are highly light-sensitive, so they are rarely displayed.
This painting was the first Matisse painting ever exhibited in New York, incidentally!
No kidding. That is really cool. Where was it first exhibited?
In a gallery at 291 5th Avenue, owned by the photographer Alfred Stieglitz. It's a physically small work, but it has a lot of presence, Matisse's color is so vibrant, and it has that interesting history! It was also included in the infamous "Armory Show" here in New York in 1913, the exhibition that introduced the NYC public to international modern art. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me about Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl?
Sure! The artist Charles Christian Heinrich Nahl was originally from Germany and had a prolific career painting in the United States. He often painted watercolors and sketches of animals as well as works with allegorical themes.
That eye. I've seen it in so many places. Or eyes similar to that one... Any insight?
You are looking at the Wedjat eye! The Wedjat is a symbol of the Ancient Egyptian god Horus, who the king was thought to be the human embodiment of. The symbol is used as a protective measure in burials and funerary texts against evil forces. Horus is also shows as a falcon with wings outstretched. You'll see those two motifs repeat all throughout ancient Egyptian art
How did the artist get the paint to "come out" like that? Did the artist just dab large amounts of paint?
The effect you're noticing is called "impasto" coming from the Italian word for "mixture." It is a technique where paint is laid on an area of the surface very thickly, usually thickly enough that the brush or painting-knife strokes are visible. Artists at the time were drawn to this technique because it recorded the "action" of painting itself.
Richard Pousette-Dart actually created these large canvases that were densely packed with details from various cultures. He was inspired by Native American, African, and Oceanic art and wanted to convey transcendent spiritual truths.
Interesting...
I personally like getting really close, and then slowly taking small steps backwards to see new details emerge.
What and who is this?
That would be a sarcophagus lid carved of limestone. It was intended as a lid for a wealthy scribe and priest named Pa-di-Inpu. The very wealthy could afford stone sarcophagi, which have survived through the ages, whereas the less wealthy used wood or terra cotta for items in their tombs.
Why in Arabic?
Aha! Great question!
Mona Hatoum is the artist, and she likes to point at the idea of the youth in Arab countries, who are caught between action and inaction because of the political climates in their countries. "Waiting Is Forbidden" can be taken to mean no loitering.
Is she the photographer? Where are her pieces located?
She is a Canadian-based sculptor an most of her pieces are exhibited in Canada. Interestingly the artist hired a traditional sign-maker to create the work in the same format as a traditional Cairo street sign, which often has the name of the street written in two languages.
It's part of her series called "Cairo," where she also speaks about the immigrant journey, particularly for children and teenagers who stand between two different cultures.
Can you tell me some more about the painting titled The Root? Who are these people?
The figures are entirely fictional -- Lynette Yiadom-Boakye doesn't work with models. Instead she assembles images from scrapbooks, drawings, and her imagination.
Here's a quote from the artist that we find interesting: "The thing is that if you use a model, the painting becomes about capturing that particular person, and it’s disappointing if you can’t. I once tried to paint a friend, an incredible character, and it just wasn’t him. So moving away from that was to do with freedom.”
She paints quickly, completing the bulk of each canvas in a single day!
The label for this says Brooklyn waterfront is across. do you know where? Or is any of the businesses depicted here are still standing or in operation?
This painting depicts the OLD East River Park, which is now called "Carl Schurz Park." 
Oh. Where's that?
It's located on Manhattan's Upper East Side. If you looked out over the East River from this point today, you'd see Astoria, Queens. I used to live right in that area! You'd see brick apartment buildings and some warehouses from this vantage point.
Carl Schurz Park is located along FDR Drive in Manhattan, adjacent to the tip of Roosevelt Island.
Oh, I think I know it.
Most, if not all, of the buildings you see in this painting are long gone. There isn't much industry in the Astoria area any more as it has become quite residential.
Fun Fact: Carl Schurz Park is located near Gracie Mansion, where the mayor lives.
"A clever approach to representing depth, before the invention of perspective." When was perspective invented? And by whom?
In 1434/35, Leon Battista Alberti published the first major Renaissance treatise on perspective by Alberti based on ideas already known since antiquity.  At the same time, the great Florentine architect Brunelleschi (as in the dome of the cathedral) was experimenting in one point perspective. Prior to this, there were certainly attempts to create perspective but there was no scientific basis. It really was just artist trying to recreate nature. After Alberti it becomes scientific perspective as opposed to the earlier illusion of perspective.
Gothic art drew a lot of inspiration from Byzantine tile work, where figures can't appear to be behind each other, so they are stacked. Here the artist is stacking the figures to depict how a crowd of people might look.
Is the map suggesting that these areas share a common cultural or spiritual thread?
Did the Inca and Aztec share a common pantheon of gods?
The map is there to contextualize different tribes and peoples with current geo-political boundaries.
As for your second question, no, the Inca and Aztec didn't share much in terms of spiritual beliefs. The Aztec, reside in current day Mexico and northern Central America, whereas the Inca were based in South America. The Inca controlled almost the entire western region of South America extending from southern Colombia to central Chile.
There are similarities in their appreciation and execution of large building projects, but outside of that their gods and origin beliefs are very different. Would you care to know more?
Yes, please.
Okay! There is a fair amount of information, so let me start with the creation myths for both peoples.
The Aztecs believed that in the beginning was the void. It was at some ancient time in the Aztec creation story that the dual god, Ometecuhtli/Omecihuatl, created itself. This god was good and bad, chaos and order, male and female. Being male and female, it was able to have children. It had four, which came to represent the four directions of north, south, east and west.
The Inca believed that in the beginning, all was darkness and nothing existed (popular belief). Viracocha the Creator came forth from the waters of Lake Titicaca and created the land and the sky before returning to the lake. He also created a race of people - in some versions of the story they were giants. These people and their leaders displeased Viracocha, so he came out of the lake again and flooded the world to destroy them. He also turned some of the men into stones. Then Viracocha created the Sun, Moon and stars.
Sounds like Genesis.
It does, doesn't it? Floods, Giants, the beginning being entirely darkness. There are parallels to Christianity found in many other belief systems.
Does the museum have later Matisse paintings in the collection?
We have paintings from 1906 and 1916-17, not on view right now, as well as many prints, but they are highly light-sensitive, so they are rarely displayed.
This painting was the first Matisse painting ever exhibited in New York, incidentally!
No kidding. That is really cool. Where was it first exhibited?
In a gallery at 291 5th Avenue, owned by the photographer Alfred Stieglitz. It's a physically small work, but it has a lot of presence, Matisse's color is so vibrant, and it has that interesting history! It was also included in the infamous "Armory Show" here in New York in 1913, the exhibition that introduced the NYC public to international modern art. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.