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Shirah Dedman, Phoebe Dedman, and Luz Myles visiting Shreveport, Louisiana, where in 1912 their relative Thomas Miles, Sr., was lynched. 2017. (Photo: Rog Walker and Bee Walker for the Equal Justice Initiative)

Brooklyn Talks: Bryan Stevenson with Sanford Biggers and Glenn Ligon

Tuesday, July 25, 2017

6–10 pm

Martha A. and Robert S. Rubin Lobby, 1st Floor

Auditorium seating is SOLD OUT.

This Brooklyn Talks conversation is sold out, but due to high demand we’re making available tickets to a simulcast of the conversation in our Lobby, as well as the special preview of the new exhibition, The Legacy of Lynching: Confronting Racial Terror in America. The conversation is between Bryan Stevenson, founder of the Equal Justice Initiative, and artists Sanford Biggers and Glenn Ligon, and is moderated by poet, essayist, and playwright Elizabeth Alexander.

The Legacy of Lynching: Confronting Racial Terror in America, organized by the Brooklyn Museum in collaboration with the Equal Justice Initiative (EJI) and Google, is opening July 26. Based on historical research conducted by EJI, it presents the family histories of victims of racial terror lynchings that took place between 1877 and 1950, and their descendants. To their testimony, the exhibition joins works by artists in the Museum’s collection—Sanford Biggers, Mark Bradford, Elizabeth Catlett, Melvin Edwards, Theaster Gates, Rashid Johnson, Titus Kaphar, Jacob Lawrence, Glenn Ligon, Dread Scott, Clarissa T. Sligh, Kara Walker, and Jack Whitten—that address this history. The exhibition confronts the difficult topic of racial violence, while exploring the radical potential of art to promote healing.

Schedule:

  • 6–10 pm Exhibition preview
  • 7 pm Panel discussion

Tickets are $10 and include admission to the exhibition and Lobby seating to view the simulcast.

The Legacy of Lynching: Confronting Racial Terror in America is organized by the Brooklyn Museum and the Equal Justice Initiative with support from Google.