All posts by Beau Sievers

Beau Sievers

Beau Sievers is a composer and music cognition researcher. He has a blog. Growing up in the Bay Area, he's been bossing computers around (and vice versa) since the 3rd grade. He is currently working on his PhD at the University of Virginia.

Indian. Utka Nayika, late 18th century. Opaque watercolor on paper, sheet: 9 13/16 x 7 9/16 in. (24.9 x 19.2 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Dr. Ananda K. Coomaraswamy, 36.241

Split Second Stats #7: Contentiousness

A big part of experiencing art is talking about it. Sometimes (or, uh, frequently) artworks are successful because they provoke disagreement, and along with that…

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Indian. Krishna and Balarama on Their way to Mathura, Folio from a Dispersed Bhagavata Purana Series, ca. 1725. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper, sheet: 9 1/2 x 12 in. (24.1 x 30.5 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Paul E. Manheim, 69.125.4

Split Second Stats #6: Subconscious Effects

In the previous post I closed by noting that depending on what participants were asked to do, visual complexity could affect their ratings. Indeed, we…

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Indian. Nanda Requests a Horoscope for Krishna, Page from a Bhagavata Purana series, ca. 1725. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper, sheet: 9 1/8 x 10 1/2 in. (23.2 x 26.7 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Poster, 78.260.5

Split Second Stats #5: Complexity

Complexity is an important factor in the evaluation of art. In all of the previous Split Second blog posts I’ve talked about how the complexity…

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Indian. Episode Surrounding the Birth of Krishna, Page from a Dispersed Bhagavata Purana Series, late 17th-early 18th century. Opaque watercolor on paper, sheet: 10 1/8 x 15 15/16 in. (25.7 x 40.5 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Emily Manheim Goldman, 1991.180.10

Split Second Stats #4: Engagement

In previous Split Second blog posts, we looked at the effects of thin-slicing, textual information, and gender. Put another way, we were studying the effects…

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Mughal (style of). Lady with a Yo-yo, ca. 1770. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper, sheet: 9 1/4 x 6 3/16 in. (23.5 x 15.7 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Alan Kirschbaum, 80.268.1

Split Second Stats #3: Gender and Information

In the last blog post about Split Second, I talked about how adding extra information about a work changed what people thought about it. In…

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Portrait of an Old Man is a simple painting whose score improved dramatically (20 points) when participants read its full curatorial label.

Split Second Stats #2: Adding Information

Last week I talked about our Split Second: Indian Paintings exhibition and Malcolm Gladwell’s book Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking. In the previous…

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Indian. King Solomon and His Court, 1875-1900. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper, sheet: 19 11/16 x 11 7/8 in. (50.0 x 30.2 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of James S. Hays, 59.205.16

Split Second Stats #1: Thin-slicing vs. unlimited time

A big inspiration for Split Second: Indian Paintings was the book Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking by Malcolm Gladwell. Blink introduced the general…

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BklynFlow on GitHub

The essential experience of Wikipedia is, for me, one of deep focus without effort — of getting lost in thought without feeling like I’m really…

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