All posts in Technology

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The data we gather at each step informs the next one. Simple, right? [

Going Responsive with Agile Planning

“Three Simple Truths” from The Agile Samurai by Jonathan Rasmussen: 1. It is impossible to gather all the requirements at the beginning of a project….

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Google Analytics (along with zip code metrics) showed the majority of participation in Click! and Split Second was coming from local sources.

Local Matters

If you’ve been reading the blog lately you know we’ve been taking stock of our digital efforts and making considerable changes. I’ve been discussing what’s not…

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In order to test quickly, we used off the self hardware in the form of iPod Touches, iPads, and iMessage.

Leveraging Technology for Connection

As Sara mentioned in her previous posts, we’ve been careful in this project to let visitor need pave the way toward an idea. It was…

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Staff were stationed throughout the permanent collection to determine what type of guidance visitors were seeking.

Piloting a Future Visitor Experience

A series of internal meetings got us set on the path for this project, but we wanted to test it with our visitors. To do…

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Meetings with staff from across departments helped gather ideas that would later be tested with visitors.

Taking Assumptions with a Grain of Salt

As Shelley introduced in her last post, we have the very ambitious goal of overhauling our visitor experience through an initiative funded by Bloomberg Philanthropies…

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Everyone streaming through our doors has unique needs. How can we serve them better?

Visitor Powered Technology to Create a Responsive Museum

We are incredibly excited that Bloomberg Philanthropies has funded a three-year initiative as part of Bloomberg Connects and it gives us the opportunity to significantly improve…

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Teaching next-gen art making for the next generation of artists

Since we first made use of our 3D printer, we’ve grown the number of things we’ve used it for, ranging from creating a participatory experience…

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Hiroko Okada (Japanese, born 1970). Future Plan #2, 2003. Chromogenic photograph, 54 13/16 x 35 1/8 in. (139.2 x 89.2 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of the artist and Robert A. Levinson Fund, 2008.25. © Hiroko Okada

Clear Choices in Tagging

Remember my post on Social Change? We’ve been evaluating our digital projects with a careful eye toward what’s working and what isn’t.  At this juncture,…

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The nicest error page we hope you never see.

Cloud Watching

A few years ago we moved away from hosting our website infrastructure from its dusty basement to the Cloud. This brought a certain peace of…

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Material at The Commons on Flickr has been moved to Wikimedia and seeded into appropriate articles, such as the Paris Exposition of 1900.

Social Change

There comes a moment in every trajectory where one has to change course.  As part of a social media strategic plan, we are changing gears…

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Robert Nardi photographing Senwosret III

How about a nice game of 3D printed chess?

Earlier this year, we started exploring how 3D printing could enhance the visitor experience and began by introducing it on that month’s sensory tour. In…

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The Dinner Party (Heritage Floor; detail)

Writing Women Back Into History

As I embarked on The Dinner Party Wikipedia project, my first step was to conduct a thorough assessment of the presence of these 1,038 women…

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The Dinner Party

Ending the ongoing cycle of omission

The conversation about sexism on Wikipedia is longstanding. In 2011, The New York Times Room for Debate took up the question of why there are…

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Figure of a Hornblower

“Africanizing” Wikipedia

As I’ve been leading the current Wikipedia initiative at the Brooklyn Museum, I have recently started working with our curator of African Art, Kevin Dumouchelle,…

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WikiAfrica logo

Collaborating with WikiAfrica

In September 2012, a representative from WikiAfrica approached us about working with them to provide Africa-related content to the Wikimedia Foundation’s websites. As the WikiAfrica profile…

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Wikipedia logo

Adding Our Voice to the Wikipedia Chorus

Our online collections have a relatively small number of visitors compared to the whopping 470 million unique visitors to Wikipedia each month. Every day, hundreds…

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In Conversation iPad Kiosk

Moving Toward a Conversation

If you’ve ever heard me speak at conferences you know that one of our most successful technology projects is also one of our simplest—the comment…

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Social Singles Scavenger Hunt

Looking for love?

I’ve been at the Brooklyn Museum for about a year-and-a-half now, which is also as long as I’ve been a resident of our fair borough….

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Fine Lines Sensory Tour

Teaching with a 3D Simulacrum

When Shelley and David brought up the idea of 3D printing, my not-so-inner tech geek and my really-blatantly-outer education geek got pretty excited.  As Shelley…

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Join us at #table17

The Brooklyn Artists Ball is coming up next week and it’s an event that we are super excited about; this year’s ball celebrates Brooklyn and…

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123dcatch_windows_600px

Replicating a 19th Century Statue with 21st Century Tech

My first exposure to the world of 3D printing took place in 2009 approximately 500 feet under the Earth’s surface in a former missile silo…

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Double Pegasus

3D Printing for Accessibility

In the last year, we’ve seen a lot happening in the museum space with 3D printing.  The Smithsonian is working on what looks like a enormous project,…

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Yeon Ji Yoo

Join us in Celebrating GO

It’s hard to believe we are here after dozens of artist and voter meetups throughout the summer; an exhilarating open studio weekend that resulted in…

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Curators taking a look at the work of Naomi Safran-Hon during the installation of GO in the Brooklyn Museum mezzanine gallery.

Making Choices to Create an Exhibition

Once we had our group of the ten most nominated artists, Eugenie and I set out on our part of the collaboration. We visited the…

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GO installation

Creating a Framework to Collaborate with the Public

You have been following us from the 1708 studios to 9,457 nominations to 10 nominees to the 5 featured artists. Let’s take a look at…

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featured artists

Our GO Featured Artists

Since our announcement of our top ten nominated artists in late September, Eugenie Tsai (John and Barbara Vogelstein Curator of Contemporary Art) and I have visited their…

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GO Nominated Artists

Your Ten Nominated Artists

After approximately 147,000 studio visits to 1,708 artists, and then 9,457 nominations, we have our top ten nominated artists. In alphabetical order: Aleksander Betko, Cobble…

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Heat Map

Moving Toward an Exhibition with 9,457 Nominations

As you saw in Shelley’s previous post, we were thrilled about the level of participation over the open studio weekend. At the same time, we…

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Open Studio Weekend Visitation Statistics

As the nomination phase of GO continues this week, now is a good time to review the weekend and share some statistics about weekend visitation…

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Brooklyn Museum staff will be out seeing as many studios as possible during the open studio weekend.

GO See Art in Brooklyn This Weekend!

Our borough-wide open studio weekend is finally just days away! On September 8th and 9th, more than 1800 artists across 46 neighborhoods in Brooklyn will…

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Getting Beyond the Like Button

The open studio weekend is just 16 days away and as we get closer, it’s worth taking a look at some of the participatory design choices we’ve…

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Red Hook Houses and GO Open Studios

Partnering with NYCHA for GO

GO is a project that’s rooted in community, but “community” is one of those words that can have a lot of different meanings. As Sharon…

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Participants discuss work at a recent open studio event in Brooklyn.

The Open Studio Model

As we’ve noted in our posts, the inspiration for GO came from two primary sources: ArtPrize and the long and burgeoning tradition of open studio…

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ArtPrize in 2010

Learning from ArtPrize

As we continue to move forward throughout the summer, it seems fitting to talk about the inspiration behind GO.  I’ve already mentioned that the Brooklyn…

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Map showing the 1861 registered artists registered to open their doors for GO.

1861 Artists Will Open Their Studio Doors Sept 8-9

When Sharon and I first started discussing the project that would become GO, one of our sources of inspiration was a map that the Brooklyn…

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Why Artist Registration for GO Continues to Surprise Me

As Sharon mentioned in her post yesterday, we continue to get a lot of questions and wanted to answer a few of them prior to…

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Why I Hope Artists Will Participate in GO

I have received a wide range of questions about GO from artists. Some of the more skeptical ones have included “So, it’s a contest?” and…

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Team GO

Going Local with a Distributed Network

You’ve probably heard that if Brooklyn were its own city, we’d be the fourth largest in the United States. With a land mass of 73…

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GO: a community-curated open studio project

Let’s GO

Over the years many people have asked me if we’d do Click! again and my general response has been to say that we wouldn’t do a…

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Sunset from the Brooklyn Museum roof.

A Sunset for 1stfans

It’s been roughly three and half years since Will Cary and I started the 1stfans Membership program at the Museum; come July, the program will…

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Senwosret III

Vetting Wikipedia for WikiLink

In Shelley’s previous post, she announced the installation of QR codes installed in exhibitions that lead visitors to Wikipedia articles for further information. These QR…

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WikiLink

WikiLink (QR Redux)

You may remember my blog post a while back, QR in the New Year?  In it, I talked about our QR code testing and reported…

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Brooklyn Museum in Google Art Project

Google Art Project Deux

Starting today, you can find the Brooklyn Museum in Google Art Project. I’m here in Paris at the launch for the second phase where more…

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QR Signage

QR in the New Year?

A while back, I reported that we were in the process of a trial period with QR codes.  We’ve just taken a look at the…

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Kiosks in Split Second

In the Gallery vs. Online: How a Split Second Can Differ

One of the questions people always ask me is how web differs from what happens in the building and that’s a difficult thing to get…

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Nayika Awaits Her Lover

Split Second: A Curator’s Reaction to the Results

I’ve had a lot of time to mull over the results of the Split Second, so here are a few of my thoughts—roughly one week…

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Led by Songhur Balkhi and Lulu the Spy, the Ayyars Slit the Throats of Prison Guards and Free Sa'id Farrukh-Nizhad

Split Second: Why Indian Paintings?

I am listed as a contributor to the Split Second project, but I really wasn’t the brains behind it; I’m just the person who okayed…

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Indian. Utka Nayika, late 18th century. Opaque watercolor on paper, sheet: 9 13/16 x 7 9/16 in. (24.9 x 19.2 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Dr. Ananda K. Coomaraswamy, 36.241

Split Second Stats #7: Contentiousness

A big part of experiencing art is talking about it. Sometimes (or, uh, frequently) artworks are successful because they provoke disagreement, and along with that…

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Youth and Beauty iPad Kiosks

Proving a Point with Google Images

When most of us think about the roaring twenties, we envision scenes of flappers cutting loose on the dance floor, bustling cities filling with new…

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Indian. Krishna and Balarama on Their way to Mathura, Folio from a Dispersed Bhagavata Purana Series, ca. 1725. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper, sheet: 9 1/2 x 12 in. (24.1 x 30.5 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Paul E. Manheim, 69.125.4

Split Second Stats #6: Subconscious Effects

In the previous post I closed by noting that depending on what participants were asked to do, visual complexity could affect their ratings. Indeed, we…

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Indian. Nanda Requests a Horoscope for Krishna, Page from a Bhagavata Purana series, ca. 1725. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper, sheet: 9 1/8 x 10 1/2 in. (23.2 x 26.7 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Poster, 78.260.5

Split Second Stats #5: Complexity

Complexity is an important factor in the evaluation of art. In all of the previous Split Second blog posts I’ve talked about how the complexity…

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Lee Mingwei

Give a Flower, Share Your Experience

As Eugenie noted in her post, The Moving Garden is installed in our Rubin Pavilion and the artist invites the visitor to take a flower…

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QR Codes on TSA Signs

QR Code Conundrum

I’ve long been a critic of QR Codes.  When I look around, I see low adoption rates, technical hurdles for end users and some really…

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iPad Kiosk Use

The Avatar and the iPad: Lessons Learned

As Jenny mentioned in her previous post, we had an interactive running on a series of iPads in Vishnu: Hinduism’s Blue Skinned Savior and now that…

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Indian. Episode Surrounding the Birth of Krishna, Page from a Dispersed Bhagavata Purana Series, late 17th-early 18th century. Opaque watercolor on paper, sheet: 10 1/8 x 15 15/16 in. (25.7 x 40.5 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Emily Manheim Goldman, 1991.180.10

Split Second Stats #4: Engagement

In previous Split Second blog posts, we looked at the effects of thin-slicing, textual information, and gender. Put another way, we were studying the effects…

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Latino List in the App Store

How has your culture shaped your life and accomplishments?

All eyes will be on you this fall when you enter the Great Hall and encounter the twenty-five massive photographic portraits by Timothy Greenfield-Sanders that…

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Should I Stay or Should I Go?

An interesting post popped up at ReadWriteWeb yesterday that evaluates our social media efforts across platforms—the author questions if we are spread too thin and…

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Mughal (style of). Lady with a Yo-yo, ca. 1770. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper, sheet: 9 1/4 x 6 3/16 in. (23.5 x 15.7 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Alan Kirschbaum, 80.268.1

Split Second Stats #3: Gender and Information

In the last blog post about Split Second, I talked about how adding extra information about a work changed what people thought about it. In…

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mapBK_collection

Geotag Brooklyn

Trying to track the history of the images of Brooklyn that we’re geotagging for #mapBK on Flickr and Twitter and then porting to Historypin reminds me of the…

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Portrait of an Old Man is a simple painting whose score improved dramatically (20 points) when participants read its full curatorial label.

Split Second Stats #2: Adding Information

Last week I talked about our Split Second: Indian Paintings exhibition and Malcolm Gladwell’s book Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking. In the previous…

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Indian. King Solomon and His Court, 1875-1900. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper, sheet: 19 11/16 x 11 7/8 in. (50.0 x 30.2 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of James S. Hays, 59.205.16

Split Second Stats #1: Thin-slicing vs. unlimited time

A big inspiration for Split Second: Indian Paintings was the book Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking by Malcolm Gladwell. Blink introduced the general…

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Google Analytics - Split Second - New York Participants

Come visit your data in Split Second

Watching Split Second: Indian Paintings get installed into the gallery this week has been a real thrill for me. I believe it is vital that…

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Historypin

Help us pin Brooklyn to the map!

If you know and love Brooklyn we need your help to get 300+ images from our collection pinned to Historypin’s map before their launch on…

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Instagr.am

35 Animal Mummies meet Twitter and Instagr.am

If you read Lisa’s post on the animal mummy field trip to the Animal Medical Center and got as excited as we did, follow us…

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TechCrunch Disrupt

Come hack with us at TechCrunch Disrupt!

It’s been two years since we released our collections database API and since that time we’ve seen a variety of use from iPhone and iPad…

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Split Second Thank You

The online evaluation phase of Split Second: Indian Paintings came to a close yesterday evening and now it’s time to say thanks to everyone who gave us…

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Moonrise Poem

Poetry Comes to our Collection Online

Did you know that April is National Poetry Month?  To celebrate, the Department of Cultural Affairs and the Mayor’s office is hosting Poem In Your…

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U.S.S.R Technical Books installation

History Continues with the Cold War, Vietnam, and Early Apple Computer Kiosks

This is the final post in a tour through the Museum’s historical exhibition press releases, taking us up to the 1980s. If you’ve enjoyed this…

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PHO_E1949i007

Press Releases from World War II and beyond

The previous post on the Museum’s recently completed digitizing of historical exhibition press releases highlighted some excerpts from the 1920s, 30s, and early 40s. There…

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Inventions for Victory

The 20th Century through the Museum’s Press Releases

We’ve just completed digitizing and making available on our website the hundreds of exhibition press releases the Museum has issued since the 1920s.  Though it’s…

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Next up, what you see is what you get.

This post continues the discussion about the tool we developed for Split Second.  Once you get past stressing and (possibly) scrolling in the timed trial, the…

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Indian. Page from an Astrological Treatise, ca. 1750. Opaque watercolor on paper, sheet: 7 3/4 x 4 1/2 in. (19.7 x 11.4 cm). Brooklyn Museum, 71.120

Brooklyn Museum books online!

About a year ago, inspired by LACMA’s Reading Room, we started thinking about digitizing some Brooklyn Museum publications. We were excited to learn that many…

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Stressing and Scrolling in a Blink

One of the things we wanted to do with Split Second is talk about the tool that we developed for the online activity.  Much like…

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What do you see in a split-second?

Today, we are launching Split Second: Indian Paintings and it’s something I’ve been excited about for quite a while. Split Second is an opportunity to…

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Subversion Ma

Wikipop iPads and Visitor Metrics

Now that Seductive Subversion has closed, it’s time to look at the Wikipop project and report on what we’ve seen in the galleries over the…

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