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Elizabeth A.Sackler Center for Feminist Art

Grace Graupe-Pillard

NYC,
USA

WRITTEN BIO

Grace Graupe-Pillard has exhibited her artwork throughout the USA with one-person exhibitions in Hartford, Ct., Jackson, Miss., Chicago, Ill. and Newark, NJ, in addition to NYC at The Proposition, Donahue/Sosinski Art, Bernice Steinbaum Gallery, Hal Bromm Gallery, and Wooster Art Space. She has also had one-person exhibitions at The Frist Center for The Visual Arts in Nashville, Tenn., The New Jersey State Museum and The New Jersey Center for Visual Arts. In 2006, she had a one-person exhibit at Carl Hammer Gallery in Chicago, and in 2008 she had solo shows at Moravian College’s Payne Gallery and Rupert Ravens Contemporary. She has participated in group exhibitions at The Noyes Museum, P.S. 1 Contemporary Art Center, Bass Museum, The Indianapolis Museum of Art, The Maier Museum, The Aldrich Museum, The Drawing Center, The Hunterdon Museum and The National Academy Museum.

Graupe-Pillard has received grants from The New Jersey State Council on the Arts and The National Endowment for the Arts. She has received public art commissions from Shearson Lehman American Express, AT&T, Peat Marwickt, The Port Authority Bus Terminal in NYC and the City of Orange, NJ. Public art projects also include commissions from NJ Transit for their new Hudson Bergen Light Rail Transit System in Jersey City, and Hoboken’s 2nd Street Station, as well as an artwork for NJ Transit’s Aberdeen-Matawan Station.

Grace Graupe-Pillard’s work has been written about in The Village Voice, The NY Times, Art News, The Star Ledger, The New Art Examiner, Newsday, Flash Art, Art Forum, Art in America and Digital Review. From l993-l995, Ms. Graupe-Pillard was appointed a Visual Arts Panelist for The NY State Council on the Arts.

Graupe-Pillard has also been involved with many online projects and has showed her photos and videos at Scope Miami, Scope London and Art Chicago.

http://ggp.NeoImages.net

http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=graupepillard

Feminist Artist Statement

Since 1975, my work has dealt with feminist issues, beginning with large paintings depicting male and female frontal nudes of various ages who did not “fit into” the dictates of the “gaze” controlled by the male-dominated art history/museum network.

Today, in 2008, I am still interested in many of the same issues. Power and the abuse of power—such as the conflicts between men and women both on a personal and political level—are ever-present in my consciousness and my artwork. Violence and especially war, with its collateral damage that turns people into refugees – particularly women and children- have been at the center of my work since 2003.

My videos deal with topics ranging from the death of my mother to personal worries and idiosyncracies such as the invisibility of older women in the artworld.

<p>Woman on Flowered Sheet</p>

Woman on Flowered Sheet

Since 1975, my work has dealt with feminist issues, beginning with large paintings of male and female frontal nudes of various ages who did not “fit into” the dictates of the “gaze” controlled by the male-dominated art history/museum network.

Woman on Flowered Sheet

Since 1975, my work has dealt with feminist issues, beginning with large paintings of male and female frontal nudes of various ages who did not “fit into” the dictates of the “gaze” controlled by the male-dominated art history/museum network.

Lewis

I am interested in the individual quirks of the naked and vulnerable body. I find beauty in its architectonic nature, which is neither glamorous nor heroic, but which is instead very human in its simplicity and ordinariness.

Kay and Joe

Kay and Joe chose those two chairs and placed them side by side. The contrast between their body language, attitudes and skin tones was revelatory.

There was also a matter-of-fact-quality about their poses that felt very comfortable.

Lonnie

I am interested in the way folks portray themselves, their body language, their attitude. Lonnie chose to bring along the material which he flung across his shoulder.

Andrea

Andrea was in her late teens when she posed for me. She wore a leather strap on her ankle to indicate that she was a young virgin.

Women Running

For the past 6 years, I have been working on a series of paintings exploring the devastating effect of war on the civilian population—particularly on women and children—a persistent theme in my art. Entitled DISPLACEMENT, this series correlates the dislocation of civilians in war-torn countries with a visual disintegration of form, evident in both the creative process and in the final painted product. In each painting, the chaos of cultural disintegration is symbolized by the fragmentation of the picture plane through the reduction of forms into unpredictable, flatly colored eccentric shapes further emphasizing the collapse of form from its original photographic source. The process of translating these images into oil paintings involves a change in scale, color and texture, portraying a seductive beauty that reflects the political “sanitization” of the horrors of war.

Waiting for Food

This painting depicts women and children in a refugee camp in Sudan. In a world where terrorism, ethnic cleansing, and cultural upheaval have dominated the news headlines, I can admit to an obsession with global conflicts and explore them in my work. I deal with lives? that have been torn apart by war, as well as with detainees who are in confinement—often indefinitely—and who are subject to a disregard for their civil rights, as well as to dehumanizing treatment in the guise of necessary wartime information-gathering.

This series correlates the displacement of civilians in war-torn countries with a visual disintegration of form, evident in both the creative process and in the final painted product. In each painting, the chaos of cultural disintegration is symbolized by the fragmentation on the picture plane.

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24 Fifth Avenue
NYC, 10011
USA

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Text, images, audio, and/or video in the Feminist Art Base are copyrighted by the contributing artists unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved.