Exhibitions: Designs of Byzantine Mosaics by M. Eustache de Lorey

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    Designs of Byzantine Mosaics by M. Eustache de Lorey

    Press Releases ?
    • Date unknown, approximately 1932: A unique exhibition of reproductions of Byzantine mosaic decoration will be shown at the Museum in the Sculpture Court beginning January 22. The originals of these mosaics were discovered in a mosque in Damascus by Eustache de Lorey, who for many years has been Director of the French Institute at Damascus, and who is an archeologist of considerable fame. It was under his direction that the restoration and the identification of the panels were accomplished. These are particularly valuable in the history of art as representing a period in the history of Byzantine Art heretofore lacking in authentic examples. They show a remarkable adherence to the Hellenistic tradition that had obtained in the arts of Mediterranean countries though many centuries. The realism with which the naturalistic subjects are handled distinguishes them from the more abstract treatment characteristic of the school. These copies were executed by native artisans under the direction of M. de Lorey and reproduce not only the color and spirit of the originals but are an exact arrangement of the bits of glass that formed the original mosaics. This exhibition will be of particular interest to students of architecture, archeology and design.

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      Primarily for notice, rather than for review.

      Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1931 - 1936. 01-06_1932, 007.

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