Skip Navigation

Prints of Our Allies

DATES November 12, 1943 through December 5, 1943
COLLECTIONS Asian Art , European Art
Sorry, we don't have any images of this exhibition.
  • Date unknown, approximately 1943: An exhibition entitled “Prints of our Allies” opens in the Print Gallery of the Brooklyn Museum, November 12 and is current through December 5. The greater part of the exhibition is composed of prints from the Museum’s own collection which includes Belgian, Czechoslovakian, Danish, Dutch, English, Mexican and Norwegian examples.

    Representing an art of “multiple originals,” prints have the quality of being useful as well as susceptible to artistic direction, thus they are particularly appropriate in a period when many different peoples are working together for a common cause.

    The present exhibition is assembled to show some of the ideas, subject matter and expressive qualities that have interested the modern artists of our allies. In modern times, prints can play a great part in reaching out to a wider public, not only in esthetic enjoyment, but in the field of better understanding and knowledge among peoples.

    Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1942 - 1946. 10-12/1943, 131. View Original
  • November 12, 1943: A new exhibition entitled “Prints of our Allies,” opens today in the Print Gallery of the Brooklyn Museum and is current through December 5. The work of nineteenth century and contemporary artists is shown. Included in the exhibition are:

    Great Britain - Harry Morley, Paul Nash, John Piper, Julien Trevelyan, Eric Gill, Kenneth Steel and John Banting;
    Holland - J. ten Klooster, Jongkind and Zilcken;
    Belgium - Ensor, Muenier, Rops and Masereel;
    Poland - Skoczylas, Steller and Kulisiewica;
    Norway -Hagemann;
    Denmark - Schultz;
    Czechoslovakia - Sokol;
    Mexico - Mendez, Orozco
    Greece - Galanis
    Yugoslavia - Mestrovic
    Russia - Groyaev
    China - Teng Kwei

    The work is done in lithography, etching, woodcut and wood engraving. The Mexican, Polish, Russian and Czechoslovakian artists are sternly aware of the changing ideas, turmoil and uncertainties of the immediate present while others maintain a more detached viewpoint. The present exhibition is assembled to show the conflicting ideas and problems confronting the artists of our Allies and how individually they are influenced by them.

    Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1942 - 1946. 10-12/1943, 133. View Original