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Louisiana Heritage: Photographs by James Ricau

DATES May 25, 1950 through June 26, 1950
COLLECTIONS Photography
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  • May 24, 1950: The Brooklyn Museum opened to the public today (May 24) an exhibition of 40 photographs entitled “Louisiana Heritage” by James Henri Ricau. It will remain on view through June 26.

    Mr. Ricau was born in New Orleans, Louisiana in 1916. Having spent his childhood and early youth in New Orleans, he comes naturally by his love for the graceful architecture of the plantation houses which are the subjects for his photographs. In photographing them he has captured some of the magnificence and the romance that is an integral part of this heritage. His careful planning and research in making a photographic record has covered approximately a 15 to 20 year period.

    Some of Mr. Ricau’s photographs have been published in Plantation Parade by Harnett Kane, American Buildings by James Fitch, Southern Calendar by Hastings House, Madame Magazine, etc. His first exhibit was at the Crosley Galleries in Washington, D.C. He was photographer for J. J. Augustin, publishers and in 1946 was appointed director of World Fine Arts Foundation. In 1948, he became editor-in-chief of “Mast”, the official U.S. Maritime magazine.

    Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1947 - 1952. 04-06/1950, 055. View Original
  • Date unknown, approximately 1950: The Brooklyn Museum wishes to announce that the exhibition “Louisiana Heritage”, which features documentary photographs of plantation houses of Louisiana by James Ricau, will be extended through July 12.

    The exhibition which portrays the romantic heritage of the South is displayed in the Photographic Gallery on the 2nd floor. After its showing at the Brooklyn Museum the exhibition will travel through the country.

    Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1947 - 1952. 04-06/1950, 062. View Original