Exhibitions: Islamic Art (installation).

  • 1st Floor
    Arts of Africa, Steinberg Family Sculpture Garden
  • 2nd Floor
    Arts of Asia and the Islamic World
  • 3rd Floor
    Egyptian Art, European Paintings
  • 4th Floor
    Contemporary Art, Decorative Arts, Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art
  • 5th Floor
    Luce Center for American Art

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    Islamic Art (installation).

    Press Releases ?
    • May 1991: The reinstalled and refurbished Islamic Gallery at The Brooklyn Museum has just gone on view. It includes a number of new items from the permanent collection, among them several that have never before been on public view, including an exemplary fifteenth-century enameled and gilded glass Syrian mosque lamp and a sixteenth-century Persian leather tooled doublure of a book binding.

      The reinstallation has been organized by Layla Diba, Associate Curator of Islamic Art at The Brooklyn Museum, with a view toward exhibiting as wide a range as possible of Islamic art, which spans 1,300 years and ranges geographically from Spain to Southeast Asia. Mrs. Diba has selected examples that represent the many phases in the long development of Islamic art that demonstrate the evolution of the Islamic aesthetic up to the recent past. Both fine and applied arts are included, among them calligraphies, rugs, woven textiles, and ceramics. In the new wall texts, Mrs. Diba details the historical, social, and religious contexts of each object.

      All the objects on view illuminate aspects of daily life and religious ritual. Among the additions to the Islamic Gallery are recently acquired gifts and objects in the permanent collection that have not been on view for more than 20 years. They include an octagonal ceramic tile from mid-sixteenth-century Damascus, a ceramic bowl with flaring sides from ninth[-] or tenth[-]century Nishapur, an eighteenth-century Persian prayerbook of ink and gold on paper with a lacquered pasteboard binding and a leather spine, a brass jug inlaid with silver and inscribed in nashk script from fourteenth-century Persia, and an Isfahan wool pile rug from [seventeenth-]century Persia.

      Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1989 - 1994. 01-06/1991, 083-84. View Original 1 . View Original 2

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      The Brooklyn Museum Archives maintains a collection of historical press releases. Many of these have been scanned and made available on our Web site. The releases range from brief announcements to extensive articles; images of the original releases have been included for your reference. Please note that all the original typographical elements, including occasional errors, have been retained. Releases may also contain errors as a result of the scanning process. We welcome your feedback about corrections.
      For select exhibitions, we have made available some or all of the informative text panels written by the curator or organizer. Called "didactics," these panels are presented to the public during the exhibition's run, and we reproduce them here for your reference and archival interest. Please note that any illustrations on the original didactics have not been retained, and that the text may contain errors as a result of the scanning process. We welcome your feedback about corrections.
      For select exhibitions, we have made available some or all of the objects from the Brooklyn Museum collection that were in the installation. These objects are listed here for your reference and archival interest, but the list may be incomplete and does not contain objects owned by other institutions or lenders.
      This section utilizes the New York Times API in order to display related materials in New York Times publications.