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Rajasthani Painting

DATES March 1990 through July 1990
COLLECTIONS Asian Art
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  • January 1990: Rajasthani Painting, the first of two Rajasthani installations featuring works from The Brooklyn Museum’s permanent collection of Indian paintings, will open February 16 and will remain on view in the Indian Painting Gallery, located on the second floor, through April 30, 1990. This first installment of the exhibition will feature paintings from Rajasthani centers in northwest India, such as Amber-Jaipur, Bikaner, Bundi-Kota[,] and Kishangarh, where painting developed and flourished under the patronage of the Rajput rulers between the 17th and 19th centuries. The second part, scheduled to be on view May through July, 1990, will include examples from Jodhpur, Marwar, Mewar[,] and other hinterland areas of Rajasthan.

    Distinct styles are discernible in the evolution of the Rajput schools. Originating in a village tradition characterized by two-dimensional composition, stylized figures, and the use of bold colors, Rajasthani painting was also influenced by artistic trends prevailing in western India, the Muslim sultanates[,] and the Mughal court. The resulting style combines sensitive naturalism, shading and perspective, grace, and the symbolic use of color in the rendering of Indian courtly life.

    Rajasthani Painting was selected and organized by Amy G. Poster, Curator of Asian Art, with the assistance of Usha Ramamrutham, Research Associate for Asian Art. It is the third in a series of exhibitions that will eventually reveal the Museum’s complete collection of Indian paintings. The series will culminate in the publication of a catalogue raisonné written by Ms. Poster.

    Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1989 - 1994. 01-03/1990, 016-17. View Original 1 . View Original 2
  • April 1990: Rajasthani Painting II, the second of two Rajasthani installations featuring works from The Brooklyn Museum’s permanent collection of Indian paintings, will open May 5 and will remain on view in the Indian Painting Gallery, located on the second floor, through July 16, 1990. This second installment of the exhibition will feature paintings from Rajasthani centers such as Jodhpur, Marwar, Mewar, and other hinterland areas of Rajasthan, where painting developed and flourished under the patronage of the Rajput rulers between the 17th and 19th centuries.

    Distinct styles are discernible in the evolution of the Rajput schools. While traditional Rajput painting was influenced by artistic trends prevailing in western India and in the Mughal courts, areas such as Marwar and Mewar display distinct elements of the indigenous village tradition, characterized by two-dimensional composition, stylized figures, and the use of bold colors. Strong use of earth colors--glowing reds, browns, greens, and oranges--contribute to the strength of the compositions.

    Rajasthani Painting II was selected and organized by Amy G. Poster, Curator of Asian Art, with the assistance of Usha Ramamrutham, Research Associate for Asian Art. It is the fourth in a series of exhibitions that will eventually reveal the Museum’s complete collection of Indian paintings. The series will culminate in the publication of a catalogue raisonné written by Ms. Poster.

    Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1989 - 1994. 04-06/1990, 078-79. View Original 1 . View Original 2