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German Expressionism in Prints: 1905-1925

DATES November 3, 1948 through January 16, 1949
COLLECTIONS European Art
  • November 3, 1948: A comprehensive exhibition, “German Expressionism in Prints, 1905-1925,” opened in the Print Galleries of the Brooklyn Museum on November 3. The exhibition will remain on view through January 16, 1949.

    One hundred and twenty-five woodcuts, lithographs, etchings and drypoints are shown featuring twenty-six examples by Ernst Kirchner, one of the most outstanding artists of the German Expressionist group. The exhibition includes the work of thirty artists among whom are Heckel, Nolde, Schmidt-Rottluff, Rohlfs, Pechstein, Beckmann, Barlach, Dix, Lehmbruck, Marcks, Campendonk, Hofer, Kollwitz, Grosz, Miller, Marc, Kokoschka, Kandinsky, Klee and Feininger.

    German Expressionism, which developed and flourished during the first quarter of the twentieth century, reflected the atmosphere of foreboding and apprehension which hung over European society. In Germany, it was not only keyed to the times, but was often a tragic statement of artistic premonition. The holocaust of the first World War was anticipated in harsh rhythms, disturbing tensions and in emotional excitement. Artists found the graphic arts well suited to the heightened restlessness and shifting social and political problems of the time. The woodcut, often favored by the German Expressionist artist, afforded a bold and sharp medium whose rugged black and white qualities could by exploited with the utmost dramatic force.

    Whether inspired by primitive art, as was often the case with Schmidt-Rottluff, Kirchner, Rohlfs and Heckel, or by the everyday life of the common folk as were Kollwitz and Barlach, the art of the German Expressionist artist was charged with emotional intensity, sociological implications and repressions.

    German Expressionism was at its height from 1910 through the early years of the ill-fated Weimar Republic and became a political crime during the Nazi regime. It still retains its dramatic potentialities and speaks for our own time as this comprehensive exhibition of original prints copiously demonstrates.

    Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1942 - 1946. 10-12/1946, 135. View Original
  • November 3, 1948: A comprehensive exhibition, “German Expressionism In Prints, 1905-1925,” opened in the Print Galleries of the Brooklyn Museum on November 3. The exhibition will remain on view through January 16, 1949.

    One hundred and twenty-five woodcuts, lithographs, etchings and drypoints are shown featuring twenty-six examples by Ernst Kirchner, one of the most outstanding artists of the German Expressionist group. The exhibition includes the work of thirty artists among whom are Heckel, Nolde, Schmidt-Rottluff, Rohlfs, Pechstein, Beckmann, Barlach, Dix, Lehmbruck, Marcks, Campendonk, Hofer, Kollwitz, Grosz, Miller, Marc, Kokoschka, Kandinsky, Klee and Feininger.

    German Expressionism, which developed and flourished during the first quarter of the twentieth century, reflected the atmosphere of foreboding and apprehension which hung over European society. In Germany, it was not only keyed to the times, but was often a tragic statement of artistic premonition. The holocaust of the first World War was anticipated in harsh rhythms, disturbing tensions and in emotional excitement. Artists found the graphic arts well suited to the heightened restlessness and shifting social and political problems of the time. The woodcut, often favored by the German Expressionist artist, afforded a bold and sharp medium whose rugged black and white qualities could by exploited with the utmost dramatic force.

    Whether inspired by primitive art, as was often the case with Schmidt-Rottluff, Kirchner, Rohlfs and Heckel, or by the everyday life of the common folk as were Kollwitz and Barlach, the art of the German Expressionist artist was charged with emotional intensity, sociological implications and repressions.

    German Expressionism was at its height from 1910 through the early years of the ill-fated Weimar Republic and became a political crime during the Nazi regime. It still retains its dramatic potentialities and speaks for our own time as this comprehensive exhibition of original prints copiously demonstrates.

    Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1947 - 1952. 10-12/1948, 093. View Original