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Kachina Doll

Arts of the Americas

This kachina doll represents Chaveyo, one of the most fearsome beings for the Hopi. His identifying characteristics include nakedness, dots on the legs and/or feet, crosses on the cheeks, and a cape thrown over the shoulders. Chaveyo belongs to the group normally referred to as Ogre Kachinas, characterized by bulging eyes and a protruding snout exhibiting a fierce aspect. While dancing, Chaveyo uses his ferocity to scare children, women, and even men into behaving. He appears anytime during the spring, but especially during the Powamuya (Bean Dance) and the Palolo Kongi (Water Serpent Dance), when Chaveyo is badgered by clowns until he whacks them away.


Esta muñeca kachina representa a Chaveyo, uno de los seres más temidos por los Hopi. Sus características incluyen desnudez, puntos en las piernas y/o pies, cruces en las mejillas, y una capa sobre los hombros. Chaveyo pertenece al grupo comúnmente referido como los Kachinas Ogro, caracterizado por ojos protuberantes y un morro prominente de fiero aspecto. Mientras danza, Chaveyo utiliza su ferocidad para asustar a los niños, mujeres, e incluso hombres logrando así buena conducta. Puede aparecer en cualquier momento durante la primavera, pero especialmente durante el Powamuya (Danza del Frijol) y el Palolo Kongi (Danza de la Serpiente de Agua), cuando Chaveyo es acosado por payasos hasta que los hace huir a golpes.

MEDIUM Wood,pogment fur, cotton, horsehair, feather, shell, horn, stone
DATES late 19th century
DIMENSIONS 12 1/4 x 5 x 3 in. (31.1 x 12.7 x 7.6 cm)  (show scale)
COLLECTIONS Arts of the Americas
MUSEUM LOCATION This item is not on view
ACCESSION NUMBER 05.588.7193
CREDIT LINE Museum Expedition 1905, Museum Collection Fund
RIGHTS STATEMENT Creative Commons-BY
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CAPTION Hopi Pueblo (Native American). Kachina Doll, late 19th century. Wood,pogment fur, cotton, horsehair, feather, shell, horn, stone, 12 1/4 x 5 x 3 in. (31.1 x 12.7 x 7.6 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Museum Expedition 1905, Museum Collection Fund, 05.588.7193. Creative Commons-BY
IMAGE overall, 05.588.7193.jpg. Brooklyn Museum photograph
"CUR" at the beginning of an image file name means that the image was created by a curatorial staff member. These study images may be digital point-and-shoot photographs, when we don\'t yet have high-quality studio photography, or they may be scans of older negatives, slides, or photographic prints, providing historical documentation of the object.
CATALOGUE DESCRIPTION This Kachina represents Chaveyo and according to Barton Wright in "Classic Hopi and Zuni Kachina Figures" he is one of the most fearsome beings. If a youngster or an adult misbehaves badly this Kachina may come looking for him unless he mends his ways. The characteristic identifiers include nakedness, dots on legs and/or feet, crosses on his cheeks, and a cape thrown over the shoulders.This Kachina is in the grouping normally referred to as an ogre Kachina. It has bulging eyes and a protruding snout exhibiting a fierce aspect. In dances Chaveyo uses this ferocity to scare the children and even men into behaving. He appears during the Spring anytime but especially during the Powamuya (Bean Dance) and the Palolo Kongi (Water Serpent Dance) being badgered by clowns until he whacks them away.
RECORD COMPLETENESS Best (82%)
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