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Clock, Model 4082

Decorative Arts

On View: American Identities: A New Look, Modern Life, 5th Floor

Gilbert Rohde ran one of the most successful American design studios of the early twentieth century. In a series of clocks designed for Herman Miller Clock Company, he transformed the traditional timepiece into a contemporary idiom through stark geometry, sleek curves, and modern numerals. This clock was first exhibited at the 1933-34 Century of Progress Exposition in Chicago.

MEDIUM Elm burl, chrome-plated metal, other metals, glass
  • Place Manufactured: Zeeland, Michigan, United States
  • DATES ca. 1933
    DIMENSIONS 7 x 13 3/8 x 2 1/2 in. (17.8 x 34.0 x 6.4 cm)
    MARKINGS Printed in black on the clock face: below the number 12, "HERMAN [monogram of conjoined 'H M' within a circle] MILLER"; along the bottom edge, "HERMAN MILLER CLOCK CO. ZEELAND, MICH. U.S.A." Metal plate attached to lower edge of back with additional marks.
    COLLECTIONS Decorative Arts
    MUSEUM LOCATION This item is on view in American Identities: A New Look, Modern Life, 5th Floor
    ACCESSION NUMBER 1999.141.5
    CREDIT LINE Gift of Paul F. Walter
    CAPTION Gilbert Rohde (American, 1894-1944). Clock, Model 4082, ca. 1933. Elm burl, chrome-plated metal, other metals, glass, 7 x 13 3/8 x 2 1/2 in. (17.8 x 34.0 x 6.4 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Paul F. Walter, 1999.141.5. Creative Commons-BY
    CATALOGUE DESCRIPTION Clock model 4082. Upright rectangular body of wood with rounded front corner at proper left side. Square clock face set into front of body at proper right behind glass plate; clock face has white ground with stylized blocky numbers in black; black hour and minute hands and red second hand. Three parallel, raised chrome-plated metal bands run widthwise across the center of the body of the clock and wrap around the proper left side; the bands overlap the clock face slightly.
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