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Arts of Africa

The Lele make masks that have much in common with those of their Bushoong, Shoowa, and Ngeende neighbors of the Kuba kingdom but are much more rare. Stylistically, they are usually much flatter than those of the Kuba and are generally decorated with red and white pigments. This Lele carver made imaginative and skillful use of pigment to underline volume contrasts such as the convex, almond-shaped eyes–with multiple eyebrows stacked on top of each other to accentuate the eyes–and the pronounced relief of the nose, ears, and cicatrization marks.

The masks appear principally at the funerals of chiefs and elders but are also used in annual performances that celebrate and teach the history of Lele origins and migrations. In those performances, they are associated with the founding clans of the communities, who have superior status to the members of clans that arrived later.
MEDIUM Wood, pigments, fiber
DATES late 19th or early 20th century
DIMENSIONS 13 x 9 1/2 x 8 1/2 in. (33 x 24.1 x 21.6 cm)  (show scale)
COLLECTIONS Arts of Africa
MUSEUM LOCATION This item is not on view
CREDIT LINE Mr. and Mrs. Milton F. Rosenthal, Carll H. de Silver Fund and A. Augustus Healy Fund
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CAPTION Kuba (Lele subgroup). Mask, late 19th or early 20th century. Wood, pigments, fiber, 13 x 9 1/2 x 8 1/2 in. (33 x 24.1 x 21.6 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Mr. and Mrs. Milton F. Rosenthal, Carll H. de Silver Fund and A. Augustus Healy Fund, 82.160. Creative Commons-BY
IMAGE overall, 82.160_transp2747.jpg. Brooklyn Museum photograph
"CUR" at the beginning of an image file name means that the image was created by a curatorial staff member. These study images may be digital point-and-shoot photographs, when we don\'t yet have high-quality studio photography, or they may be scans of older negatives, slides, or photographic prints, providing historical documentation of the object.
CATALOGUE DESCRIPTION Facial portion of mask carved on a relatively flat wooden plate,squared on top and curved at bottom. Eyes are almond-shaped with narrow open slits in the center. There are three deeply carved continuous heart-shaped linesover the eyes, and one underneath. The areas between contain white and ochre pigment; the areas under each eye ochre only. The nose is in high relief- long, tapered and flared slightly at the nostrils. The mouth is a small slit with white pigment. The forehead is slightly convex. There are three diamond shaped cicatrizations on the forehead and one on each cheek. A knob in very high relief appears on either side of the eye. A raffia trim attachment outlines the face, and there is an elaborate raffia cap-like headdress. Condition: Very good. There are raffia losses on top of the headdress , but it is stable and not shedding. Pigment around the eyes is beginning to flake slightly.
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