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Elizabeth A.Sackler Center for Feminist Art

Aglaonice

Flourished by 3rd century B.C.E., Thessaly, ancient Greece

Aglaonice (Aganice) is considered the first female astronomer in ancient Greece, known for her knowledge of the moon and its cycles. Her ability to predict lunar eclipses gained her a reputation as a sorceress who could make the moon disappear from the sky. She is mentioned by Apollonius of Rhodes (third century B.C.E.) and Plutarch (C.E. 46–after 119), both of whom say that she was the daughter of one Hegemon or Hegetor of Thessaly.

Judy Chicago (American, b. 1939). <em>The Dinner Party</em> (Heritage Floor; detail), 1974–79. Porcelain with rainbow and gold luster, 48 x 48 x 48 ft. (14.6 x 14.6 x 14.6 m). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of the Elizabeth A. Sackler Foundation, 2002.10. © Judy Chicago. Photograph by Jook Leung Photography
Judy Chicago (American, b. 1939). The Dinner Party (Heritage Floor; detail), 1974–79. Porcelain with rainbow and gold luster, 48 x 48 x 48 ft. (14.6 x 14.6 x 14.6 m). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of the Elizabeth A. Sackler Foundation, 2002.10. © Judy Chicago. Photograph by Jook Leung Photography

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