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Elizabeth A.Sackler Center for Feminist Art

Morrigan

Mythic, worshipped in Celtic Ireland, beginning circa 600 B.C.E.

The Celtic goddess of war and death, Morrigan is similar to Alecto of the Furies. Literally “great queen,” she is a tripartite goddess with multiple identities. Sometimes she is paired with two other Celtic goddesses, Macha and Badb, to form the triple goddess; alternatively, Macha, Badb, and Nemain are seen as a triple goddess, collectively called Morrigan. Citing her association with death, particularly on the battlefield, she is sometimes depicted as a carrion crow, but also has associations with cattle, suggesting a connection with the land and fertility.

Judy Chicago (American, b. 1939). <em>The Dinner Party</em> (Heritage Floor; detail), 1974–79. Porcelain with rainbow and gold luster, 48 x 48 x 48 ft. (14.6 x 14.6 x 14.6 m). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of the Elizabeth A. Sackler Foundation, 2002.10. © Judy Chicago. Photograph by Jook Leung Photography
Judy Chicago (American, b. 1939). The Dinner Party (Heritage Floor; detail), 1974–79. Porcelain with rainbow and gold luster, 48 x 48 x 48 ft. (14.6 x 14.6 x 14.6 m). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of the Elizabeth A. Sackler Foundation, 2002.10. © Judy Chicago. Photograph by Jook Leung Photography

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