Skip Navigation

Jen Catron (American, born 1984) and Paul Outlaw (American, born 1980). B.S.O. (Bright Shiny Object), 2018. Papier-mâché, acrylic paint, resin, imitation chocolate sauce, pump, motorized turntable. Courtesy of Postmasters Gallery and the artists, EL186.01. (Photo: Jonathan Dorado)


                           
                           Jen Catron (American, born 1984) and Paul Outlaw (American, born 1980). B.S.O. (Bright Shiny Object), 2018. Papier-mâché, acrylic paint, resin, imitation chocolate sauce, pump, motorized turntable. Courtesy of Postmasters Gallery and the artists, EL186.01. (Photo: Jonathan Dorado)

Jen Catron (American, born 1984) and Paul Outlaw (American, born 1980). B.S.O. (Bright Shiny Object), 2018. Papier-mâché, acrylic paint, resin, imitation chocolate sauce, pump, motorized turntable. Courtesy of Postmasters Gallery and the artists, EL186.01. (Photo: Jonathan Dorado)

<p>Jen Catron (American, born 1984) and Paul Outlaw (American, born 1980). <em>Sin(k)</em>, 2018. Papier-mâché, resin, fiberglass, water pump, dyed water. Courtesy of Postmasters Gallery and the artists, EL186.02. (Photo: Jonathan Dorado)</p>

Jen Catron (American, born 1984) and Paul Outlaw (American, born 1980). Sin(k), 2018. Papier-mâché, resin, fiberglass, water pump, dyed water. Courtesy of Postmasters Gallery and the artists, EL186.02. (Photo: Jonathan Dorado)

Jen Catron and Paul Outlaw: “Sin(k)” and “B.S.O. (Bright Shiny Object)”

July 24–September 29, 2019

Martha A. and Robert S. Rubin Pavilion, 1st Floor

Artists Jen Catron and Paul Outlaw have transformed ordinary things, a bathroom sink and an ice cream sundae, into spectacularly oversized sculptures. Each structure is a self-circulating fountain: water streams from the faucet of a sink, and chocolate sauce drips onto scoops of ice cream piled high in a shiny metallic bowl. The monumental scale of these works suggests a celebration of a way of life that consumer culture has come to expect, one that includes access to abundant running water and the possibility of indulging in sweet treats. At the same time, the sculptures possess a subtly subversive edge, with hints of a more dystopic version of the American Dream lying beneath the veneer of appearances.

Jen Catron and Paul Outlaw are a Brooklyn-based collaborative team. They are primarily makers of objects, which are sometimes incorporated into performances that are playful and entertaining while making pointed cultural and political commentary.

This installation is organized by Eugenie Tsai, John and Barbara Vogelstein Senior Curator, Contemporary Art, Brooklyn Museum.