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Daybed

Decorative Arts

MEDIUM Maple and cloth-covered metal strips, late 19th century English textile applied to head rest and used to make cushion on bed.
  • Place Manufactured: New York, New York, United States
  • DATES Patented April 28, 1876
    DIMENSIONS 31 x 25 x 66 in. (78.7 x 63.5 x 167.6 cm)  (show scale)
    MARKINGS On rear of back, proper right, near crest rail: "PAT. APRIL 18, 1876 / HUNZINGER"
    SIGNATURE no signature
    INSCRIPTIONS no inscriptions
    COLLECTIONS Decorative Arts
    MUSEUM LOCATION This item is not on view
    ACCESSION NUMBER 86.177
    CREDIT LINE Gift of Bruce Newman
    RIGHTS STATEMENT Creative Commons-BY
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    CAPTION George Jacob Hunzinger (American, born Germany, 1835-1898). Daybed, Patented April 28, 1876. Maple and cloth-covered metal strips, late 19th century English textile applied to head rest and used to make cushion on bed., 31 x 25 x 66 in. (78.7 x 63.5 x 167.6 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Bruce Newman, 86.177. Creative Commons-BY (Photo: Brooklyn Museum, 86.177_IMLS_SL2.jpg)
    IMAGE overall, 86.177_IMLS_SL2.jpg. Brooklyn Museum photograph
    "CUR" at the beginning of an image file name means that the image was created by a curatorial staff member. These study images may be digital point-and-shoot photographs, when we don\'t yet have high-quality studio photography, or they may be scans of older negatives, slides, or photographic prints, providing historical documentation of the object.
    CATALOGUE DESCRIPTION Daybed, maple and cloth-covered metal strips. Plain round seat rail with incised 3/8" indentations to accommodate metal strips which form woven seat and which were originally covered with red fabric. Each side seat rail forms U-shape near back and returns, parallel to seat, to form arms with cone-shaped turned terminals. Each arm supported by two turned spindles with incised lines. Incised lines here and throughout piece retain traces of original red paint. Seat sits on two rectangular stool-like elements, front and rear, each with four turned trumpet-and-ball legs; legs connected by stretchers and on sided and end of daybed, turned spindles connect seat rail and stretcher, with drop ball finial beneath each spindle. Back is rectangular frame of turned round members, woven metal strips between turned and circular bosses at upper junctures. Above is a padded headrest at crest, now in blue velvet. Back has moveable bar with E-shaped element attached which forms rear legs when daybed is fully reclined. Simple mechanism for adjusting back in U-shape of arms with separate plain bar (b) to hold up back. Now with a blue velvet cushion not to be accessioned. Late 19th century English textile applied to head rest and used to make cushion on bed in preparation for 1997 exhibtion. CONDITION: General wear. Only traces of original red paint to be seen in incised lines. Woven seat is broken in central section; most fabric worn away; woven seat and back has been painted dark green and some traces of green paint can be seen on wooden frame, especially on back. Knob at proper right juncture of back and sea rail broken. Chips from edge of channel of adjustment mechanism, both sides.
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    George Jacob Hunzinger (American, born Germany, 1835-1898). <em>Daybed</em>, Patented April 28, 1876. Maple and cloth-covered metal strips, late 19th century English textile applied to head rest and used to make cushion on bed., 31 x 25 x 66 in. (78.7 x 63.5 x 167.6 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Bruce Newman, 86.177. Creative Commons-BY (Photo: Brooklyn Museum, 86.177_IMLS_SL2.jpg)