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Kachina Doll

Arts of the Americas

Oötsawihazru Kachina is an Ogre’s Uncle, a so-called White Ogre. These Kachinas are a little more patient than the Black Ogres, such as Chaveyo (seen nearby). Ogres, collectively called Soo’so’yokto, appear near the end of the Powamuya (Bean Dance) ceremony held in February, in which the participating Kachina spirits are implored to carry out purification of all life. Their role as Ogres is to scare people into behaving properly and following the rules.


Kachina Oötsawihazru es el Tío de un Ogro, conocido como Ogro Blanco. Estos Kachinas son un poco más pacientes que los Ogros Negros, como Chaveyo (ver Kachina Chaveyo). Ogros, llamados colectivamente Soo’so’yokto, aparecen hacia el final del Powamuya (Danza del Frijol), ceremonia realizada en febrero en la cualse les implora a los espíritus Kachinas participantes la purificación de todo lo vivo. Su rol de Ogros es asustar a la gente para que así se comporten apropiadamente y sigan las reglas.

MEDIUM Cottonwood root, acrylic pigment, hide, feathers, fur, yarn, silver
DATES 1960-1970
DIMENSIONS 21 x 8 x 6 1/2 in. (53.3 x 20.3 x 16.5 cm)  (show scale)
SIGNATURE H. Shelton, drawn arrow underneath the name, located on the bottom
COLLECTIONS Arts of the Americas
MUSEUM LOCATION This item is not on view
ACCESSION NUMBER 2010.6.7
CREDIT LINE Gift of Edith and Hershel Samuels
RIGHTS STATEMENT Creative Commons-BY
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CAPTION Henry Shelton (born 1929). Kachina Doll, 1960-1970. Cottonwood root, acrylic pigment, hide, feathers, fur, yarn, silver, 21 x 8 x 6 1/2 in. (53.3 x 20.3 x 16.5 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Edith and Hershel Samuels, 2010.6.7. Creative Commons-BY (Photo: Brooklyn Museum, CUR.2010.6.7.jpg)
IMAGE overall, CUR.2010.6.7.jpg. Brooklyn Museum photograph, 2010
"CUR" at the beginning of an image file name means that the image was created by a curatorial staff member. These study images may be digital point-and-shoot photographs, when we don\'t yet have high-quality studio photography, or they may be scans of older negatives, slides, or photographic prints, providing historical documentation of the object.
CATALOGUE DESCRIPTION Ogre's Uncle (Oötsawihazru) Kachina Doll. This is a tall, slim Kachina with a large, snarling snout, red lips with open, teeth filled jaws. His mask has long, curved, green and black striped horns on either side of the head, and black goggle eyes. The back of his head has a feather bundle and he wears a fur ruff around his neck. He wears western style white pants, a concho belt with studs with turquoise circles painted in them and a purple, tailored shirt with painted white buttons. He wears painted tall, red boots with real yarn ties at the top. His PR hand is raised brandishing a bloody knife. His PL hand carries a bow (broken). He has a real hide cape tied in the front under his PR arm but he is totally carved with details underneath the cape. As an Ogre's Uncle he is a little more patient than the Black Ogres, not as active but still fearsome. Ogres (Soo'so'yoktu) appear during the ceremonies in the last stages of the Powamuya usually held in February depicting the final stages of the world's creation where Kachina spirits are implored to carry out the purification of life.
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Henry Shelton (born 1929). <em>Kachina Doll</em>, 1960-1970. Cottonwood root, acrylic pigment, hide, feathers, fur, yarn, silver, 21 x 8 x 6 1/2 in. (53.3 x 20.3 x 16.5 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Edith and Hershel Samuels, 2010.6.7. Creative Commons-BY (Photo: Brooklyn Museum, CUR.2010.6.7.jpg)

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