<em>Cat Coffin</em>, 664–332 B.C.E. Wood, glass, gesso, pigment, animal remains  (Felis sylvestris, Felis libyca, or Felis chaus), plant materials, 24 1/4 × 7 1/2 × 16 in. (61.6 × 19.1 × 40.6 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Charles Edwin Wilbour Fund, 37.1946Ea-b. Creative Commons-BY (Photo: Brooklyn Museum, 37.1946E_PS2.jpg)

Cat Coffin

Medium: Wood, glass, gesso, pigment, animal remains (Felis sylvestris, Felis libyca, or Felis chaus), plant materials

Geograhical Locations:

Dates:664–332 B.C.E.

Dimensions: 24 1/4 × 7 1/2 × 16 in. (61.6 × 19.1 × 40.6 cm)

Collections:

Exhibitions:

Accession Number: 37.1946Ea-b

Image: 37.1946E_PS2.jpg,

Catalogue Description:
The object is a wooden coffin for a cat shaped as a cat. It is made from several pieces of wood, joined with wooden dowels. The main joins appear to run lengthwise in the center of the coffin, splitting the coffin into two halves. A cat mummy was inserted inside, the coffin assembled and then the gesso and layer of dark material (paint?) was applied, affectively sealing the wood assembly seams. The coffin (a) was constructed to be inserted into a wooden base (b). The base is made from a single piece of wood and has hollow areas carved out to accept the mortise like joins at the undersides of the feet at both the front and rear of the cat. The tail of the cat is carved from three pieces of wood that have been doweled into the top of the base. In looking at the x-radiographs taken, the mummy inside appears to have the cat positioned so that the front legs are up and bent as opposed to long and crossed over the body as is seen on other cat mummies.On the coffin, there is a roughened depression at the top of this cat's head.

Brooklyn Museum