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N. E. Thing Co. Iain Baxter (Canadian, b. England, 1936) and Ingrid Baxter (American, b. 1938). 1. Time, detail from North American Time Zone Photo–V.S.I. Simultaneity, October 18, 1970, 1970. Offset lithograph, 1712 × 1712 in. (44.5 × 44.5 cm). Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Gift of Iain Baxter and Ingrid Baxter, 1995


                          
                          N. E. Thing Co. Iain Baxter (Canadian, b. England, 1936) and Ingrid Baxter (American, b. 1938). 1. Time, detail from North American Time Zone Photo–V.S.I. Simultaneity, October 18, 1970, 1970. Offset lithograph, 171⁄2 × 171⁄2 in. (44.5 × 44.5 cm). Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Gift of Iain Baxter and Ingrid Baxter, 1995

N. E. Thing Co. Iain Baxter (Canadian, b. England, 1936) and Ingrid Baxter (American, b. 1938). 1. Time, detail from North American Time Zone Photo–V.S.I. Simultaneity, October 18, 1970, 1970. Offset lithograph, 1712 × 1712 in. (44.5 × 44.5 cm). Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Gift of Iain Baxter and Ingrid Baxter, 1995

<p>Installation view of the exhibition <i>955,000</i> including construction made following instructions provided by Richard Serra; Vancouver Art Gallery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, January 13–February 8, 1970; organized by Lucy R. Lippard. Vancouver Art Gallery Archives. (Photo: Vancouver Art Gallery)</p>

Installation view of the exhibition 955,000 including construction made following instructions provided by Richard Serra; Vancouver Art Gallery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, January 13–February 8, 1970; organized by Lucy R. Lippard. Vancouver Art Gallery Archives. (Photo: Vancouver Art Gallery)

<p>Eleanor Antin (American, b. 1935). 100 Boots Facing the Sea, Del Mar, California. February 9, 1971, 2:00 p.m.(mailed: March 15, 1971, 1971–73. Photograph, 8 × 10 in (20.3 × 25.4 cm). © Eleanor Antin. (Photo: Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, New York/www.feldmangallery.com)</p>

Eleanor Antin (American, b. 1935). 100 Boots Facing the Sea, Del Mar, California. February 9, 1971, 2:00 p.m.(mailed: March 15, 1971, 1971–73. Photograph, 8 × 10 in (20.3 × 25.4 cm). © Eleanor Antin. (Photo: Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, New York/www.feldmangallery.com)

For her 100 Boots project, Eleanor Antin photographed rubber boots in a variety of scenarios set mostly around Southern California. The boots themselves performed as active characters; some configurations emphasized an “everyman” quality and personal experiences such as economic hardship, while others alluded to the war in Vietnam, and the excitement of the big city. Antin printed each photograph as postcards, which she mailed to hundreds of people, allowing the boots’ narrative to unfold over the course of twenty-eight months. Their journey ended at the Museum of Modern Art, where all fifty-one of the postcards were ultimately displayed.

<p>Vito Acconci (American, b. 1940). <i>Following Piece</i>, 1969. Activity, 23 days, varying times each day; typewritten statement, 11 × 8<sup>1</sup>⁄<sub>2</sub> in (27.9 × 21.6 cm). Photographic negatives: Acconci Studio; archival documents: Ilona Rich, Brooklyn. © Vito Acconci. (Photo: Betsy Jackson, courtesy Acconci Studio, New York)</p>

Vito Acconci (American, b. 1940). Following Piece, 1969. Activity, 23 days, varying times each day; typewritten statement, 11 × 812 in (27.9 × 21.6 cm). Photographic negatives: Acconci Studio; archival documents: Ilona Rich, Brooklyn. © Vito Acconci. (Photo: Betsy Jackson, courtesy Acconci Studio, New York)

<p>John Latham (British, b. Zambia, 1921-2006). Art and Culture, 1966–69. Leather case containing book, letters, photostats, and labeled vials filled with powders and liquids: case, 3 × 11 × 10 in. (7.9 × 28.2 × 25.3 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York; Blanchette Hooker Rockefeller Fund. © 2011 John Latham. (Digital image: © The Museum of Modern Art/Licensed by SCALA/Art Resource, NY)</p>

John Latham (British, b. Zambia, 1921-2006). Art and Culture, 1966–69. Leather case containing book, letters, photostats, and labeled vials filled with powders and liquids: case, 3 × 11 × 10 in. (7.9 × 28.2 × 25.3 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York; Blanchette Hooker Rockefeller Fund. © 2011 John Latham. (Digital image: © The Museum of Modern Art/Licensed by SCALA/Art Resource, NY)

<p>Rosario Group. <i>Tucumán Arde (Tucumán Is Burning)</i> Publicity Campaign (2nd Step), 1968. Graffiti. Archivo Graciela Carnevale, Rosario, Argentina. © Grupo de Artistas de Vanguardia (Avant Garde Artists Group). (Photo: Avant Garde Artists Group)</p>

Rosario Group. Tucumán Arde (Tucumán Is Burning) Publicity Campaign (2nd Step), 1968. Graffiti. Archivo Graciela Carnevale, Rosario, Argentina. © Grupo de Artistas de Vanguardia (Avant Garde Artists Group). (Photo: Avant Garde Artists Group)

<p>Lucy R. Lippard (American, b. 1937). <i>Six Years: The dematerialization of the art object from 1966 to 1972: a cross‑reference book of information on some esthetic boundaries: consisting of a bibliography into which are inserted a fragmented text, art works, documents, interviews, and symposia, arranged chronologically and focused on so‑called conceptual or information or idea art with mentions of such vaguely designated areas as minimal, anti‑form, systems, earth, or process art occurring now in the Americas, Europe, England, Australia, and Asia (with occasional political overtones)</i>, edited and annotated by Lucy R. Lippard, 1973. Printed book, first edition. New York: Praeger. Brooklyn Museum Library. Special Collections. From the Library of Thea Westreich/Ethan Wagner</p>

Lucy R. Lippard (American, b. 1937). Six Years: The dematerialization of the art object from 1966 to 1972: a cross‑reference book of information on some esthetic boundaries: consisting of a bibliography into which are inserted a fragmented text, art works, documents, interviews, and symposia, arranged chronologically and focused on so‑called conceptual or information or idea art with mentions of such vaguely designated areas as minimal, anti‑form, systems, earth, or process art occurring now in the Americas, Europe, England, Australia, and Asia (with occasional political overtones), edited and annotated by Lucy R. Lippard, 1973. Printed book, first edition. New York: Praeger. Brooklyn Museum Library. Special Collections. From the Library of Thea Westreich/Ethan Wagner

Elizabeth A Sackler
                    Center for Feminist Art

Materializing “Six Years”: Lucy R. Lippard and the Emergence of Conceptual Art

September 14, 2012–February 17, 2013

This exhibition is devoted to examining the defining impact Lucy R. Lippard’s groundbreaking book Six Years had on the emergent Conceptual art movement. Published in 1973, Six Years simultaneously catalogued and described the development of conceptual art practices in the late sixties and early seventies, and is now widely considered an essential reference work for the period. Using the book’s content to structure the exhibition, Materializing “Six Years” showcases the artists brought together and championed by Lippard, and demonstrates how her curatorial projects, critical writing, and political engagement helped to redefine exhibition-making, art criticism, and the viewing experience.

The exhibition will feature more than 170 objects by nearly ninety artists who were working internationally across a range of mediums. In addition to presenting important artworks, the exhibition will convey the political foment of an era that saw both the emergence of Conceptual art and the rise of the Women’s Rights, Civil Rights, and anti–Vietnam War movements, and will illustrate the period’s experimental impulses through catalogues, artist publications, periodicals, photographs, and ephemera from key exhibitions and events.

Materializing “Six Years” is organized by Catherine Morris, Curator of the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, Brooklyn Museum, and independent curator Vincent Bonin.

This exhibition is made possible by the Elizabeth A. Sackler Foundation. Additional generous support has been provided by the Helene Zucker Seeman Memorial Exhibition Fund.

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